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Iddee
Aug 13th 2009, 07:38 PM
Fifty Years of Math 1959-2009 (in the USA )

Last week I purchased a burger at Burger King for $1.58. The counter girl took my $ 2 and I was digging for my change when I pulled 8 cents from my pocket and gave it to her. She stood there, holding the nickel and 3 pennies, while looking at the screen on her register. I sensed her discomfort and tried to tell her to just give me two quarters , but she hailed the manager for help. While he tried to explain the transaction to her, she stood there and cried. Why do I tell you this? Because of the evolution in teaching math since the 1950s:

1. Teaching Math In 1950s

A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price. What is his profit ?

2. Teaching Math In 1960s

A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is 4/5 of the price, or $80. What is his profit?

3. Teaching Math In 1970s

A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80. Did he make a profit?

4. Teaching Math In 1980s

A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is $80 and his profit is $20. Your assignment: Underline the number 20.

5. Teaching Math In 1990s

A logger cuts down a beautiful forest because he is selfish and inconsiderate and cares nothing for the habitat of animals or the preservation of our woodlands. He does this so he can make a profit of $20. What do you think of this way of making a living? Topic for class participation after answering the question: How did the birds and squirrels feel as the logger cut down their homes? (There are no wrong answers, and if you feel like crying, it's ok.)

6. Teaching Math In 2009

Un hachero vende una carretada de maderapara $100. El costo de la producciones es $80. Cuanto dinero ha hecho?

BjornBee
Aug 13th 2009, 08:20 PM
No sense in Math. The government will have all your money and there will be no need for numbers.....other than the one you get standing in line to buy food, see a doctor, vote for the self-imposed dictator.... :shock: I'm sorry. This is the year 2012.... :o

tecumseh
Aug 20th 2009, 04:50 AM
so what is EXACTLY the first and second deriatives of the function which describes the timber harvester's profit?

BjornBee
Aug 21st 2009, 06:39 PM
Hey Yo! This forum is called the "lighter side".... :?

Iddee
Aug 21st 2009, 07:58 PM
Yeah, BJ, I think he was somewhat lightheaded when he posted that one. He forgot who his audience was.

Bhodi
Aug 31st 2009, 10:22 PM
Last week I purchased a burger at Burger King for $1.58. The counter girl took my $ 2 and I was digging for my change when I pulled 8 cents from my pocket and gave it to her. She stood there, holding the nickel and 3 pennies, while looking at the screen on her register. I sensed her discomfort and tried to tell her to just give me two quarters , but she hailed the manager for help. While he tried to explain the transaction to her, she stood there and cried.


:lol: :lol:
I've done this many times before! So sad a cashier can't make change in their head when it's their job to handle and count money all day.
I've seen a lot of confused looks, but have yet to reduce someone to tears!

On a related note, after my wife got a widom tooth pulled, I went to the store to get her some food.
The cashier packed these two items in the same plastic bag: a half gallon of ice cream and a 32oz container of piping hot soup. ...just...wow...

BjornBee
Sep 1st 2009, 06:26 AM
Yeah, BJ, I think he was somewhat lightheaded when he posted that one. He forgot who his audience was.

I grew up in the 80's. And I was lucky if I underlined the right answer..... :lol:

BjornBee
Sep 1st 2009, 06:36 AM
Bhodi,
I was a "bagger" for awhile in my teens. So unlike today, where the cashier does it all, I grew up being paid to pack bags.

Pack them correctly, and the really happy customers knew they could ask for assistance in wanting the same bagger to help load the groceries in the car. Sometimes it was for actual help, but many times it was to say thank you, slip me a big tip, and give me a break. Christmas and some other holidays meant huge tips. Some customers would go to the line I bagged at, even though other lines were shorter. I learned many lessons from a simple "bagger" job.

Today, getting a clerk today to say "thank you" seems too much to ask. And that goes right to the responsibility of the owner or manager. So it's the schools that can't teach, and the owners or managers that can't train them. Once, a good clerk or bagger not just moved up in the store, but moved on to better jobs just by experience alone. Today we have lifelong clerk and cashiers, that are really mind-numb robots that have little desire or expectation of doing anything else with their lives. So sad.

Hobie
Sep 1st 2009, 06:41 AM
I agree, Bjorn. There was one grocery store where I always went to the same cashier, despite the line, because she laughed and joked and it seemed like this was the greatest job in the world to her. Makes a difference.

As a challenge... during the Christmas madness, see if you can make a harried clerk smile. It's worth it!

Back to math: I've had similar things happen when, for example, your bill is $16.10, and you hand the cashier a $20, so they type it in and the change is calculated by the machine... and THEN I say, "Oh! Here's a dime!" And they stare. :shock:

And, no, I do not do this intentionally...

BjornBee
Sep 1st 2009, 07:59 AM
Sure you don't..... ;)

:lol: