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View Full Version : What about giant hives?



LtlWilli
Nov 3rd 2009, 05:13 AM
I was day-dreaming yesterday (partly snoozing) out under the mimosa tree, and the thought of finding a truly monstrous hive....What to do, or how to handle it. I was thinking of our attic for instance..
Has anyone built a superhive to accomodate such numbers. ---Like a 15-20 frame Langstroth possibly several boxes high. I realize the weight factor, but that could be dealt with.....How about an extended-length top bar hive>

...Just early morning ramblings before Folgers forces reality upon me. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Iddee
Nov 3rd 2009, 06:23 AM
Since a worker lives approx. 6 weeks in the summer, how many eggs would the queen have to lay to keep this giant hive going? A standard double deep can have 60,000 plus workers in it in the late spring and summer. She would have to lay 10,000 eggs a week, or more, just to supply it.

specialkayme
Nov 3rd 2009, 06:58 AM
In my advanced beekeeping class in college I went through a hive that was probably about 6 or 7 deeps tall, with 4 or so mediums on top of that. I don't know if that is what you were thinking about.

LtlWilli
Nov 3rd 2009, 07:04 AM
What about two deeps side-side-side as one unit, and supers added as needed?...Trying to keep overall height would be a consideration......Thank God for Folgers.... :o :lol: :lol:

Iddee
Nov 3rd 2009, 07:52 AM
There's your problem. Switch to Maxwell House and "maybe" the nightmares will go away. :wave:

LtlWilli
Nov 3rd 2009, 10:31 AM
Good point, Iddee...I think that what you all are witnessing from me is only the musings of one who is still vitually new to this....A child gazing at the night sky can easily envision cities upon any star....He drops all of that as he matures, and so shall I. :oops:

Iddee
Nov 3rd 2009, 12:09 PM
I don't know about that, Rick, I'm 64 and still think daydreaming is a wonderful pastime. Growing old is mandatory, growing up is optional. :dontknow:

Bitty Bee
Nov 3rd 2009, 08:42 PM
What about those 2 queen hives? The ones with side by side deeps that a have a box on top that merges the deeps together, and queen excluders on either deep,of course.(sorry for the long explanation, I can't remember the name for them, too late for coffee). How many bees would one of those have if it was healthy and...say...during spring. Around 100 or 120 thousand right?
Obviously not an attic full, I was just curious.

tecumseh
Nov 15th 2009, 05:27 AM
there use to be a hive (size) that were called JUMBOs. they were essentially the approximate equivalent of a deep + one medium all in one box. they fully utilized 12" lumber and also held 12 frames (if my memory still serves???). real monsters for a little guy like me to move and yes the frames were 3" deeper than a deep. I have seen them used once in my life... perhaps 30 years ago.

Cape Fear Bees
Dec 19th 2009, 09:35 PM
Thought about making a Jumbo hive like that this year, albeit 10 frame, and entirely as a novelty. I have a mill wide enough to make jumbo foundation, usually I just cut it into a deep and shallow/medium. Depends if I want strips for starting baby comb, and or how straight I run the blank through.

Bitty Bee
Dec 20th 2009, 08:57 PM
It might be interesting to see one of those, but wouldn't it be expensive to keep one?

G3farms
Dec 21st 2009, 03:45 AM
I was day-dreaming yesterday (partly snoozing) out under the mimosa tree, and the thought of finding a truly monstrous hive....What to do, or how to handle it. I was thinking of our attic for instance..


That would bring on a whole new meaning to "going into a hive"

G3

BjornBee
Jan 6th 2010, 05:22 AM
It seems to me, that many variations of hives, comes down to some individual wanting to make something different, so they can be...... well.....different! :thumbsup:

I've seen one group of beekeepers who cling to the "natural" side of things go from foundationless, to long frames (deep and a half), to now promoting TBH, and I bet this year, they will be latching onto some Warre hive design. Of course this will be with their own "model" of course, so they can be.....well.....different! :Dancing:

barry42001
Jan 22nd 2010, 10:24 AM
Actually Rick, were you to have the energy, and patience to go with a 2 queen colony, your " Giant hive " maybe be a happening thing, but as a stand alone colony populated by one queen, would think portions of the hive would be abandonded by the bees, not the SHB or Wax Mothes but not with bees. Iddee and I sometimes use different numbers about max egg laying capasity of a really good queen, I was raised on the 200 eggs a day number during peak egg laying but this figure or Iddee's are not for the entire summer season, is for a relatively short time frame like 4 - 6 weeks after that queens generally slow down quite a bit to a more sustainable number. no queen could maintain the high numbers of eggs laid in the mid - late spring or the queen would be burned out by July or August.
Barry :thumbsup:

Iddee
Jan 22nd 2010, 10:36 AM
Barry, I hope you accidentally left a zero off the above amount of eggs laid. 2000 per day is the normally accepted max number, and yes, it is a short lived time frame.

barry42001
Jan 22nd 2010, 12:42 PM
LOL yes I would think a decent or for that matter a not so decent queen could manage 200 eggs a day, with 4 leggs tied behind her back yes I left a " 0 ' off of previous post. :roll:

tecumseh
Jan 23rd 2010, 05:13 AM
Barry writes:
Iddee and I sometimes use different numbers about max egg laying capasity of a really good queen, I was raised on the 200 (+ 0) eggs a day number during peak egg laying but this figure or Iddee's are not for the entire summer season

tecumseh:
interesting point and a lot of calculations are determined by the number you use here...

so my question is what figure do folks use...

I think a maximum of 1800 eggs per day at the peak of the season is about right (not to high and not too low but right in the middle).

Iddee
Jan 23rd 2010, 06:14 AM
I've never watched and counted, but most reading I have done says about 2000 max, with 1500 average, per day, at the height of brood rearing. There's 1440 minutes in 24 hours. Even 1 per minute constant day and night would be less than 1500 per day. Two per minute would give her a short break now and then to move from one frame to another.

barry42001
Jan 24th 2010, 06:48 AM
I actually did watch a queen on a observation hive laying eggs, and while she is deliberate, inspecting each cell prior to laying a egg, she moves on a rather rapid pace, 2 eggs a minute would be very possible 3 eggs a minute if pressed by impules--again the key factor is this rate is maintained for only but a few weeks, and actually she could lay as many as 2500 eggs a day and still have time to move around, and rest a bit if the figure of 2880 at one a minute were applied not likely but possible.

Iddee
Jan 24th 2010, 07:31 AM
2880 would be two a minute, not one.........

barry42001
Jan 24th 2010, 08:47 AM
once again allowed my fatigue to hold sway over me and mentally clog the thinking process but even that error still holds at 2 eggs a minute still very possible but only under circumstances described