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BjornBee
Dec 16th 2009, 07:54 AM
What other hobbies do you have? I'm thinking outside the normal...."Take care of the chickens and work in the garden" type stuff?

Anyone primitive camp, anyone go on whitewater trips, or go caving? (I'll skip the fancy terms)

Any unusual hobby types out there?

Iddee
Dec 16th 2009, 08:39 AM
Snakes....................

cast iron cookware.................

Fishing with hands only. No tackle....................

sqkcrk
Dec 16th 2009, 09:25 AM
Church Activities
internet trouble making, otherwise known as discussion. :)
tv and movies

not a whole lot more than that. tending hives, harvesting honey, packing and distributing packed honey pretty much takes up my time. I watched a film, on the sundance channel last night, about a Buddist fellow who wrote the Tassajara Bread Book. It made me think that I'd enjoy a more Zen like beekeeping career than what I have. If I could sustain my life that way.

alleyyooper
Dec 16th 2009, 10:15 AM
I used to fish a lot. Not any longer though, the boat has been dry docked for 5 years now.

I like to cross country ski around home here. Most of the neighbours allow me to tresspass on there places.

I love snowmobileing, Minnesota is best in my books as the trail system is so huge and the NR trail sticker was only $16.00 per sled per year compaired to Michigans $25.00 per sled per year. We feel Minnesota is safer as they seem to patrol the trail and keep the drunks off better.

Then there is the hunting. We've a deer camp in the UPPER and I normall hunt the two week firearm season there. I'll then return home and do the 2 weeks of Muzzle loader season here. Then from Jan till about march I'll be hunting youtes alone or with friends.

:mrgreen: Al

Walt B
Dec 16th 2009, 11:35 AM
Bird watching, Monarch larva monitoring, woodworking.

Used to do a lot of nature walks and picnics, but we have more nature here than on the walks. :D

Walt

tecumseh
Dec 16th 2009, 03:08 PM
like al at one time I fished quite a lot. I hope to do a bit more of that in the near future with a buddy of mine that just acquired a 'new' boat. it and the crappie should be ready by early spring.

readin'... I do a lot of that in various subject.

BjornBee
Dec 16th 2009, 06:29 PM
iddee,
I saw a show on catching catfish by placing your hands into underwater holes. Seemed like a good ol' boy thing, that somehow would require at least a six pack on my part to participate..... :thumbsup:

Now bow fishing seem more like it.... :drinks:

Charles
Dec 16th 2009, 06:50 PM
My time is usually spent doing whatever it is my boy is into, right now that's building Thomas the train tracks, Dinosaurs, boxing, and football.

In my other spare time I have guns, coin collecting, and classic cars...

Then there is always the internet ;-)

Iddee
Dec 16th 2009, 07:19 PM
Catfish ain't so bad. It's the snapping turtles you have to be careful with. It takes a full 12 pack to go after them.

G3farms
Dec 16th 2009, 10:59 PM
Raising registered charolais cattle, a little artificial insimination work and flushing.

Garden work, playing with the bees, putting up hay, welding and fabrication work, gun collection, reloading, old coin collection. All of that on top of owning my own business and running it (small, but still more to do). Watching my four daughters grow up, sigh :cry:

I use to fish 6 to 7 days a week from dark til dark, almost got a divorce over that, no more fishing......well maybe 2 or 3 times a year for a couple of hours. No more time for hunting either, I love to squirrel and crow hunt, any varmit hunting is the best. Was into wood working for quite a while but switched over to metal working. Use to like mechanic work but grew tired of that, seems like a never ending job on the farm though.Did the caving, repelling, hiking, camping, rope skills and other outdoors stuff years ago. Was heavily involved in church couple of years ago until I got volunteered for everything that need repaired, built or moved, mostly by myself.

Dang........sounds like all I do is work, I need to have a little more fun I guess. Just not sure how to do it.

G3

Bitty Bee
Dec 16th 2009, 11:39 PM
Other than beekeeping and participating in church activities, I like sewing, cooking, hiking, gardening, raising assorted breeds of chickens and rabbits, shooting big guns, tire crafting, soap making, stacking fire wood, building fires, blowing stuff up, helping other people, and learning as much as I can.
My only problem is not having enough time in a day!!

tecumseh
Dec 17th 2009, 03:38 AM
G3 writes:
Dang........sounds like all I do is work

tecumseh:
it reminds me of a little paragraph in emerson's waldon pond... he made some comment about watching a farmer pass by with 40 acres on his shoulder.

humm.... don't I seem to remember you talkin' about fishin' from dawn to dark 6 or 7 days a week? yep that certainly sounds like work, work, work.

Hobie
Dec 17th 2009, 06:18 AM
Sailing beach catamarans, sewing marine canvas, photographing flowers, and sitting with cats on my lap.

That's me in the 2nd row, 3rd column...
http://users.stargate.net/~randya/flyinghulls.html

G3farms
Dec 17th 2009, 06:27 AM
humm.... don't I seem to remember you talkin' about fishin' from dawn to dark 6 or 7 days a week? yep that certainly sounds like work, work, work.


It was truly work, mostly hard core bass fishing practice. Fished in four different tournaments on seven different lakes. I gave it up cold turkey.

G3

BjornBee
Dec 17th 2009, 07:22 AM
iddee,
snappers!...nothing is worth me losing a finger.... :o

alleyyooper
Dec 17th 2009, 07:42 AM
I used to build flower beds for Kare. she has about 3800 sq. ft.of perennial beds now. She hasn't wanted any more since a mole{s} invaded one year and kept her busy replanting stuff it (they) pushed out of the ground. Nothing I tried seemed to work getting rid on them. the 12 ga did get most of the ones gotten as I could sit out and see the ground move and blast them. But I just didn't have all day to sit and watch for them.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/2004%20flower%20pictures/resizedfrontdoorgarden.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/2004%20flower%20pictures/06-30-05SouthGarden.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/2004%20flower%20pictures/6-21_delphinium_and_rock.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/ry4003.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/ry4001.jpg

:mrgreen: Al

sqkcrk
Dec 17th 2009, 08:31 AM
Very nice, Al. It looks like photography is on your list too, eh?

BjornBee
Dec 17th 2009, 09:31 AM
All them purdy flowers....and I don't see one bee.... :o

This is a bee forum you know..... :thumbsup:

:coolphotos:

sqkcrk
Dec 17th 2009, 09:42 AM
ya can't please everybody

BjornBee
Dec 17th 2009, 09:54 AM
That's true....so you better make sure who is worth the effort...... :Dancing:

I usually forget about those that have no humor first..... :lol:

sqkcrk
Dec 17th 2009, 09:56 AM
Ones self perhaps?

alleyyooper
Dec 17th 2009, 10:48 AM
Couldn't tell you if Kare took the pictures or if I did. If it is pictures of bees in or on a hive then Kare took them. deer back in the woods I took as well as any fungis pictures and the dogs.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-18Beeonswampmilkweed.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-17YellowButterflybushbee4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-17YellowButterflybushbee5.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-17YellowButterflybushbee3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-15Honeybee2.jpg

:mrgreen: Al

alleyyooper
Dec 17th 2009, 10:57 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-15beeOnLobelia.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-9Oestr.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-11woodsgardenPhlox.jpg

Building a bee garden.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-9newbeegarden8-9.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-9Beegarden8-9.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-9beegardenandarbor.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-9gardenarborbeegarden.jpg

:mrgreen: Al

alleyyooper
Dec 17th 2009, 11:05 AM
Yes I cut out and built the arbor as well.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/8-5hypercumSt.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/7c18833b.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/6d63bac6.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/DelphiniumbluewhthwhiteeyeASPG.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/Beeconeflower.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v295/oldgrumpy/759fc75a.jpg

:mrgreen: Al

BjornBee
Dec 17th 2009, 11:15 AM
Ones self perhaps?


Better believe it!

Like any good friend, I've chastised myself, argue with, and sometimes even screw myself.... :thumbsup:

But after seeing the neighborhood and others, I always come crawling back to me.

Of course it helps being a huge narcissist.... :drinks:

As they say, if you can't laugh at yourself....your usually not funny to others either...and if your laughing at yourself...who cares about the others! :Dancing:

Disclaimer....Not really sure who said that. So I may lay claim to it... :lol:

Mama Beek
Dec 17th 2009, 11:03 PM
Al, I just love your pictures! And those gardens are wonderful!

Hobie, that looks like a really good time.......knowing me though, I would drown!

Besides bees, I'm busy raising my young 'uns and all that goes with it. I love to garden, most everything does ok in spite of me....I would love to be able to get my puny gardens to look like the pics Al posts!

Since I encourage the kids to dive into learning about any and everything that interests them I usually find myself along for the ride and not minding it much. Learning to sew, I love to bake, I make some pretty decent soaps and salves, am learning more and more about medicinal herbs (trying to keep up with Baby Beek), we all stay busy with church activities and going to meetings all over the place, I like to fish but not competitively...I'm a sit on the bank and relax kind of gal. Homeschooling and shooting with the kids are my favorites lately.

alleyyooper
Dec 22nd 2009, 02:55 PM
Thank you all for the nice comments.

:roll: Mama beek, that is why they make PFD's so you don't drown.

:mrgreen: Al

srvfantexasflood
Dec 22nd 2009, 05:21 PM
Al- Those are wonderful pictures! I'm pea green with envy.
I have been gardening for a number of years. I start my own flowers from seed starting about Jan. 1, or when I can get to it. I have started gravitating towards prairie natives, since that is what was originally here. I have spent alot of time researching for a pollinator garden that I started last year.
At the same time I started beekeeping, I took up old time fiddle playing. I heard that challenging brain activities were good for people over 50. I take lessons and practice, practice, practice.

tecumseh
Dec 23rd 2009, 05:06 AM
thanks for the pictures al. I guess I can appreciate a good picture all the more since myself and a camera don't operate so well together.

sqkcrk
Dec 23rd 2009, 08:36 AM
Love the pictures alleyooper. But is your camera unplumb or is the arbor w/ the level in it unplumb? It caught my eye and I thought that it was sorta funny.

Hobie
Dec 23rd 2009, 08:52 AM
Great photos! Like a breath of summer in December.

My only "complaint" is that you are farther north than I, so I can't use that excuse as to why my garden isn't as lovely!

alleyyooper
Dec 23rd 2009, 01:56 PM
The arbor is plum and level that isw why the level was in the picture. It is one of those <_____> >_____< which line is longer thing.

I tell every one the key to Kares beautiful gardens is the red clay and horse manure.
Remember I said I built Kare gardens. Dig a hole 18 to 24 inches deep in the red clay. Fill it about 6 inches above the ground with horse manure then cover it with 8 inches of wood top soil. the top soil is nice but the tea made from the horse manure when ever it rained just makes they special.

Our bee garden is a result of MY writeing down the names of all the plants I seen honey bees on when ever we went to the garden center for a year. The next spring I started the garden starting with the earliest blooming.

I forgot to mention I like to write stories too.

:mrgreen: Al

XLB
Dec 25th 2009, 10:12 AM
>>>>>I forgot to mention I like to write stories too.<<<<<


oh yes? what kind? do tell. :beg: :D

alleyyooper
Dec 26th 2009, 10:00 AM
Mostly personal experince stuff of my own and friends. Oct 1969 is such a story of a friend.
I have had some published even.

:mrgreen: Al

Bren
Dec 27th 2009, 03:45 PM
Flower gardening, veggie gardening, mowing, computer stuff.

Omie
Dec 27th 2009, 03:52 PM
I play banjo, bowed psaltery, limberjack, mountain dulcimer, and sing Appalachian ballads. I run two very active online mountain dulcimer websites. My husband fiddles and we play lots of music.
We rides bicycles a lot- my longest ride was 70 miles in one day.
I vegetable garden.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3075/3215806301_88afb4af12.jpg

G3farms
Dec 27th 2009, 06:12 PM
A music maker, how wonderful. Do you have any of you music recorded or on the internet? I assume bluegrass and mountain music?

G3

Omie
Dec 27th 2009, 09:03 PM
A music maker, how wonderful. Do you have any of you music recorded or on the internet? I assume bluegrass and mountain music?
G3

Yes, older 'mountain music', not bluegrass. Most often called 'old-time' music.
Couple of examples, with my husband fiddling and me on mountain dulcimer:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeVB1iGFa6Q
http://harmonias.com/our-music/Lady_of_the_Lake.mp3
http://harmonias.com/our-music/Callahan.mp3

G3farms
Dec 27th 2009, 09:53 PM
I could not get the last two to load, but enjoyed the one on you tube. Sounds good to me, I like that kind of music.

Thanks for sharing that!

G3

Mama Beek
Dec 28th 2009, 04:21 AM
that's good music Omie.... my kids are learning to play fairly well too, although they usually have a lot more of a bluegrass sound than the older styles but I like them both.

Baby Beek is trying to learn to play the fiddle and does a fair job for no longer than she has been learning, she is also learning to play the piano. She sings all the time and has a great voice, especially when her nerves aren't rattled about people being able to hear her.

XLB plays bass guitar VERY well, a 6 string guitar pretty well, and is trying to learn the banjo. He taught himself to play piano by ear and doesn't do a bad job on the mandolin either. He loves to sing and does a good job for the most part. Little Man has been trying to learn the mandolin and is a wonderful singer. I think he would play the guitar well if he would ever pick one up and give it a try.

I love the sound of the dulcimer and wish more folks would play them. An old friend of mine played the hammer dulcimer and I really love the sound of those. Is it true that a dulcimer should be played with a turkey feather?? Someone told me that and it sounds too bizarre to be true.

Omie
Dec 28th 2009, 05:49 AM
I love the sound of the dulcimer and wish more folks would play them. An old friend of mine played the hammer dulcimer and I really love the sound of those. Is it true that a dulcimer should be played with a turkey feather?? Someone told me that and it sounds too bizarre to be true.

Hi, the hammered dulcimer and the mountain dulcimer are completely different instruments.
Here is Jean Ritchie playing a mountain dulcimer with a turkey quill:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8wR4GZGnZE

Bens-Bees
Jan 5th 2010, 02:18 AM
Besides bees I spend most of my time either working or ferrying my son between his three different therapists... and when I'm not doing that, I'm working on a college degree.

beekeeperhelper
Jan 5th 2010, 07:22 AM
Baking bread, especially "artisan" breads--have to use up all those herbs somehow! Birdwatching, and participating in Cornell's citizen science project feeder watch (documenting and reporting sightings of birds two days a week). My newest hobby is convincing my husband that we really need a milk cow, or two mules, or both. That hobby will occupy me for a long time, I feel.

Omie
Jan 5th 2010, 06:12 PM
Baking bread, especially "artisan" breads--have to use up all those herbs somehow!

I enjoy baking artisan bread too! Here are two white boule loaves I made today, a sesame and a poppy:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_9fPBEJTqGzw/S0PiMOEEfHI/AAAAAAAACps/-6TdmJz_ZV4/s1600/FirstBread2010_2.jpg

Oooh, and i just realized after posting this that you can see three jars of honey in the background! :mrgreen:

Bens-Bees
Jan 5th 2010, 07:40 PM
Wow. I am beginning to think that the best restaurant in all of New York is at Omie's house.

Mama Beek
Jan 5th 2010, 08:31 PM
Wow. I am beginning to think that the best restaurant in all of New York is at Omie's house.

I'm starting to think so too!

I love to bake bread too, lots of different kinds and am always trying to learn more. I'm hoping to build myself a brick oven this summer and start baking outside again....there just isn't any other way to get that texture! I need more recipes!!!

Hobie
Jan 6th 2010, 06:39 AM
Have either of you bread bakers used terra cotta pans? My sister bakes bread, and I wanted to get her something special for her birthday. The stores say the terra cotta pans are great, but they want to sell pans, and they are a lot more expensive than the metal ones.

Mama Beek
Jan 6th 2010, 08:21 AM
I've used terra cotta pots (as in flower pots) for a special order for a ladies garden party. It's about as close as you can get to brick oven without a brick oven.....that said I don't know if I would spend the extra $$ or not. There are lots of different kinds of "stone" bakeware though.

Omie
Jan 6th 2010, 08:58 AM
I swear by using my big cast iron Dutch oven covered pots. 20 minutes at 500F with lid on, 20 minutes at 450F with lid off.
I always get a beautiful crisp crust and soft inside. I lift the risen loaves on their baking parchment paper and place it all right into the pot and bake, like this:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_9fPBEJTqGzw/S ... utch-1.jpg (http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_9fPBEJTqGzw/Sh2xujfCjaI/AAAAAAAACFY/6_PQZW6xMrM/s1600/sourdoughdutch-1.jpg)
corn meal sprinkled on the paper before placing loaf on it keep sthe paper from sticking to the bread.

beekeeperhelper
Jan 6th 2010, 12:14 PM
I have a stoneware bread cloche--a round 3" deep dish with a domed lid that makes fantastic bread! It has to be oiled lightly before use and never washed in hot soapy water--just a wipe out with a damp cloth. My husband got it for me years ago (he is so smart!). I've never tried terra cotta, although I have seen very expensive pans advertised. Most of my breads are free-hand, and don't use pans, just a baking stone or flat sheet.

BjornBee
Jan 8th 2010, 05:31 AM
Not sure about anyone else, but all of a sudden, I'm hungry! :thumbsup:

My wife is from Denmark, and I lived overseas for 8 years. We miss the great bread that you can get almost on any corner in Denmark. It's a treat when we go back every year.

There is a place here locally selling at market that makes great breads, but some of my favorites can run between 8 and 12 dollars per loaf.

I think I'll be looking for a baking stone or pan as being mentioned.

beekeeperhelper
Jan 8th 2010, 06:30 AM
Bjorn,
My "baking stone" is a tile from the local orange big-box DYI store. It's flat not textured, and the kind that is unglazed and you are supposed to seal after installing--Saltillo tile it is called here. Works great and cost about 69 cents. Walt will tell you I toss nickels around like manhole covers. I prefer to think that I'm frugal.
I slip the tile into the oven, preheat, and then put my bread directly on the tile with a little cornmeal sprinkled to keep the bread from sticking. I don't use it for all breads, but for some it's the only way to bake!

Hobie
Jan 8th 2010, 07:06 AM
Omie - Given your musical talents, I just looked up this band you may enjoy: the Tiger Maple String Band. The man who takes care of my slate roof is the banjo player. Here's a video. They also have a website.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6V2oHfLF ... re=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6V2oHfLFLtg&feature=related)

I've always admired musical people, having no talent myself!

Omie
Jan 8th 2010, 09:00 AM
Omie - Given your musical talents, I just looked up this band you may enjoy: the Tiger Maple String Band. The man who takes care of my slate roof is the banjo player. Here's a video.

So where's the banjo???
They should make that guy with the electric guitar stand way in back and bring the banjo player right up front with the fiddlers to keep the beat clean and crisp. :to_keep_order:

(....can you tell I'm a banjo player?) :mrgreen:

G3farms
Jan 8th 2010, 10:13 AM
YEE HAW!! now that was some good playing right there. Them two young ladies could sure saw a fiddle in half!

I am with Omie though where is the banjo???

If that don't get your toe to tapping and put a grin on your face something has to be wrong with ya.

G3

Brenda
Jan 8th 2010, 10:42 AM
Thanks for those pretty photos Al. That makes me think I need to get to work on my flower beds this spring. I have lots of horse manure in the barn, and we sure have clay, not red but tan colored. I don't know how much clay digging I could do though.

Bitty Bee
Jan 8th 2010, 01:20 PM
I swear by using my big cast iron Dutch oven covered pots. 20 minutes at 500F with lid on, 20 minutes at 450F with lid off.I always get a beautiful crisp crust and soft inside.

Omie I have a couple cast iron dutch ovens I'm trying to break in and was curios if you would post some of your recipes?! I love to bake bread but it usually doesn't turn out with the crisp outside and soft inside that I want it to. Although, that may be because I always use regular bread pans. :D

Omie
Jan 8th 2010, 07:50 PM
WBB,
I think the Dutch ovens need to be at least 6 qt for baking bread of good size. Do a test.

I am using the basic recipe from the Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day book. It takes way longer than 5 minutes by the way. ;)
Basically, for two large loaves:
In a large tupperware food storage box, mix together 6 cups white unbleached All Purpose flour, 1 1/2 Tabspoon yeast, 1 1/2 TB kosher coarse salt or sea salt, and 3 cups slightly warm water.
Mix well with a spoon or your hands. Cover (without sealing tightly) and let sit for 2 1/2 hours. It will double and then fall.

Sprinkle with flour and dust countertop. Pull off each half and quickly pull sides under all around to make a ball with a fairly tight pulled surface. Do NOT KNEAD- you want to keep all the gas bubbles in side intact!
Place each ball on a 15" or so square sheet of parchment baking paper that has been generously sprinkled with corn meal to prevent the dough sticking to it. Let the two boule loaves 'rest' for about 50 minutes. They will rise just slightly.

Meanwhile, put your cast iron pots and covers in the oven and preheat to 500F for at least 30 minutes.

Just before baking, you can either dust the loaves with flour shaken from a small strainer and then slash them, OR you can paint the loaves with a cornstarch wash and sprinkle with seeds and then slash them.
When ready to bake, quickly open the oven, and carefully lift the parchment, loaf and all (pick up by diagonal corners) and gently and quickly place loaf, paper and all, and put the lid on tight. BE CAREFUL, the pots are very hot!
With loaves in the covered pots, close oven quickly and bake at 500F for 20 minutes. Don't worry about the parchment corners sticking out of the pot- they'll brown and get brittle but will not be a problem or catch on fire or anything.
Open oven and quickly remove lids altogether and then bake uncovered for another 20 minutes (if baking two loaves at once) or only another 15 min if doing just one loaf. This yields two large round 'boules', or three smaller round loaves.
Needless to say, a kitchen timer is essential for all this. LOL It's all worth it for the wonderful results, though.
Here's a picture of a really nice batch i spent a couple hours on...two are plain white with black sesame and white sesame seeds, and the other two are calamata olive/sundriedtomato/onion/garlic loaves with a flour dusting. Notice how the slash patterns allow the loaves to expand nicely despite the tightly pulled gluten skin when forming the ball:
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_9fPBEJTqGzw/Sg26JpazQGI/AAAAAAAACDI/IyeV61CNRMs/s1600/4-loaves_1.jpg

tecumseh
Jan 9th 2010, 05:00 AM
omie the bread looks beautiful and make my mouth water. I wish I could reach thru the screen and grab a bite.

Hobie
Jan 9th 2010, 06:28 AM
Stripey bread like bees! Looks delicious.

For you banjo players, here's a tune where they still stick poor Barry in the back corner, but he gets the vocal lead.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_c7S1Eq4jnM

If I could do my life over, the one thing I would do is learn a muscal instrument.

Omie
Jan 9th 2010, 10:21 AM
If I could do my life over, the one thing I would do is learn a muscal instrument.

You can make every new day the start of your new life.

Get a mountain dulcimer and find a teacher or club or even just watch some youtube starter lessons- it's just about the easiest instrument in the world for a beginner with no musical background to pick up and start playing. If you actually want to do this, I can help you with lots of experienced advice- I'm very into helping mountain dulcimer beginner players and I have some websites for it.

XLB
Jan 9th 2010, 01:02 PM
I don't know Omie, when i first started playing music, I thought the auto-harp had to be the easiest. I've never played a dulcimer tho, I might have to try that some time.

I've been playing my bass for the church I go to for almost 4 years and I've found it pretty easy as long as you have or can develop a sense of rhythm.

who knows, maybe if I ever go to NY our family will have to get together and play a while! :) (and talk about bees and gardening too. :mrgreen: )

Bitty Bee
Jan 9th 2010, 03:33 PM
Thank you for the recipe Omie!!!! I can't wait to try to bake some!!!!! ( i have to season my pots first)
I just hope they turn out as pretty as yours! :thumbsup:

I don't know anything about anything musically except a little bit of piano and fiddle. I really like y'alls music though, you sound very good. Hobie's friend's band sounds good too. :D
Do either of the bands play any gospel music? (Because of our religious beliefs we only play/ listen to gospel.) My favorite is bluegrass gospel but it's hard to find very many groups that don't sound depressed when they sing, so we usually listen to southern gospel.
Here is one of my favorite groups playing one of my favorite songs.
( sorry the video didn't want to work right)

Omie
Jan 9th 2010, 09:12 PM
WBB- I should have mentioned in the recipe that when you first mix the dough- i first take the 3 cups slightly warm water and divide it in half- and put the yeast in one half and the salt in the other half. That lets the yeast come alive and start activating in water thats not full of salt. After ten minutes of the yeast in the warm water, I then put the flour in a plastic big box and add both the yeast water and salt water at once then mix all with a big spoon. No kneading. The dough will be rather wet and sticky, that's how it should be. Then you cover it and let it rise for the 2.5 hours... and continue recipe.

tecumseh
Jan 10th 2010, 04:20 AM
my brother in law (curiouslylocal.com) makes bread in a dutch oven much like you describe Omie. he says it is quite good with my honey although I think perhaps he is just hitting me up for some more sweet stuff. I think I recall him one time saying that how you treated the yeast was critical... I think??? he let the yeast set some while and adds some vitamin to the yeast to make it 'happy' (his term).

tecumseh
Jan 10th 2010, 04:20 AM
my brother in law (curiouslylocal.com) makes bread in a dutch oven much like you describe Omie. he says it is quite good with my honey although I think perhaps he is just hitting me up for some more sweet stuff. I think I recall him one time saying that how you treated the yeast was critical... I think??? he let the yeast set some time and adds some vitamin to the yeast to make it 'happy' (his term).

G3farms
Jan 10th 2010, 07:46 AM
The dough will be rather wet and sticky, that's how it should be.


I have found when it is wet and sticky it makes for a more lighter and fluffier bread.

G3

Bitty Bee
Jan 10th 2010, 01:04 PM
OK, thanks again omie! I haven't made any yet, but as soon as I do I'll see if mom will help me figure out how to pictures on here for y'all to see.
We usually add yeast to warm water. Would the salt effect the way it works at all?
I've never noticed if salt hinders our yeast or not. :confused:

Omie
Jan 10th 2010, 07:30 PM
OK, thanks again omie! I haven't made any yet, but as soon as I do I'll see if mom will help me figure out how to pictures on here for y'all to see.
We usually add yeast to warm water. Would the salt effect the way it works at all?
I've never noticed if salt hinders our yeast or not. :confused:

Just let the yeast 'ripen' for it's first 10 minutes or so in the warm water without the salt.
That's why I divide the water in 1/2 and let the salt dissolve in one while the yeast soaks in the other....then I put it all together with the flour and mix. That way the yeast is never exposed to a full salt dose in the water- the flour buffers everything when you mix all together and the salt can't hurt the yeast then.

Bitty Bee
Jan 10th 2010, 08:02 PM
Ok, that makes sense. Thanks again!