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View Full Version : " AFRICANIZED BEES " found in Mandrin, Florida



barry42001
Oct 12th 2010, 10:34 AM
Mandrin is a southern subdivison of Jacksonville but AHB are not susposed to be this far north YET.
I have to dig the actual aritcle up and will post is, but a open air colony of " africanized " honeybees were found in large Oak tree about 30ft above the driveway. A beekeeper stated that he thought were the dreaded africanized bees visually. the reported accompanied his in a lift to beter report the incident. with only moderate smoking, he dismantled the colony, reporter alongside, with NO STINGS not even head butting I am more then betting fromt the behavior were european bees everything I have read indicates that africanized bees would have eaten the reporter and film crew alive, even european bees if provoked enough will from 24 inches away somebody took alot of risk for thinking they were africanized bees testing is being done results pending.
Mandrin, Fla. -- Hanging 30 feet in the air in Sara Hatt's backyard is a bee hive, bigger than a basketball.

"A residential neighborhood, a backyard is no place to have a wild bee colony," said Richard Martyniak. ""No reason to leave this here."

When the city refused to remove it, Hatt called On Your Side and was put in touch with All Florida Bee removal.com and Martyniak, an entomologist and stinging insect expert. Today, he arrived to remove the bees from Hatt's home.

A lab will have to confirm that this hive was built by aggressive African bees, but it had all of the characteristics, said Martyniak. :confused: :shock:

"African bees tend to build these external nests more frequently than European bees." he said.

To get a closer look, he positioned a lift near the hive, anchored its giant legs and put on a protective bee suit, including shoulder- length vinyl gloves and masks.

Up close, the hive was impressive - and intimidating. But the noisy bees appeared too busy to pay attention. "I would say there are about 30,000 bees," he said.

Armed with chemical spray and a saw, Martyniak sprayed the bees to keep them from flying, then removed the hive, piece by piece. His last step was to remove the entire limb.

Hatt and her neighbors watched, pleased with the outcome.

Even when the hive was in pieces, some of the bees were still buzzing but, he said, not for long. Now that the hive is gone, the residents of this Mandarin community say they can have peace of mind

tecumseh
Oct 13th 2010, 04:07 AM
it seems like some kind of testing prior to removal would be a bit better way to go.

I took out a africanized hive with european introgression (don't ask me what that really means but that is what the lab lady said) this past week. up close and personal the only reliable notion I get of africanization is cell size and the shape of the comb.

I also suspect that folks have said it enough (over and over and over) that the bias is now firmly established that by some god given rule the africanized bees have to be vicious. steve taber along with several other folks who are familar with the africanized bee suggest this is not exactly always true.

wfuavenger
Oct 14th 2010, 08:37 AM
I really donít understand why they were "Armed with chemical spray." If the bees were as gentle as reported, that would not be needed. I also don't understand the ďa protective bee suit, including shoulder- length vinyl gloves and masks." That is not a very protective/efficient bee suit if they are Africanized.

I would be willing to bet the chemical spray was sugar water or even the smoker. People ask me about what chemical I am fogging them with and why the spray bottle doesn't kill them right away. I get that a lot doing removals.

It sounds like, from this article, the person who wrote it is playing off peopleís fears and misconceptions of the AHB for readability. Who doesn't want to read about something terrifying possibly moving into their neighborhood? We, as humans, have a fascination with the grotesque. Thatís why people stop and stare at car wrecks. Everyone believes AHB are vicious and will almost kill you if given the chance. Everyone who gets the paper where this is published will probably read the article. If it was just about a removal of generic honey bees in a neighborhood, it wouldn't even get written up.

At the writing of that article it even says that the bees have to be sent off for testing to determine if it is EHB or AHB. The writer doesnít even know.

+1 to the media reinforcing unfounded fears and hype.

barry42001
Oct 15th 2010, 08:07 AM
same story bit more sensationalized---Fla. -- It's an intimidating sight, even from a distance - high in a tree 30 feet above the ground.

"It started out small. We thought it was a small bird's nest, didn't think anything of it, but now it is really big," said Sara Hatt.

The hive is in her backyard and she recently had a pest control expert look at the big bee hive in her tree and the results scared her.

"He said it was an African honey bee hive," said Hatt.

It is so menacing, it is restricting the use of her backyard. "We can't use one side ...we can't get the lawn crew to cut the yard. We can't let the dogs out to one side of the yard," she said.

Recently one of her dogs got stung and was rushed to an animal emergency room.

"By the time I got him there he was almost dying; they kept him for about six hours. It took him a week to come back from it," said Hatt.

The African bee's sting is no more venomous than the sting of a European bee, but it attacks in numbers.

She called the city of Jacksonville for help.

"The city said it can't remove it because it is on private property and the other places said they don't deal with African bees," said Hatt in frustration.

Then she tried a Louisiana expert for help. "I emailed Billy the exterminator," she said. So far no reply.

But Gainesville-based All Florida Bee Removal, a specialist in African bees, said it will remove the colony Monday. Until that happens, Hatt is warning her Mandarin neighbors.

"I've been telling the neighbors they need to stay inside, keep an eye on their animals. If we are able to get it removed, they're not able to go outside for four hours after it is gone," said Hatt. "Even my neighbors think I am playing until they actually see it."

And Hatt is likely not alone.

Expect to see more cases African Honey Bees, said Richard Martyniak of All Florida Bee Removal: They are migrating from Central to North Florida.

rast
Oct 21st 2010, 05:47 PM
I am so fortunate they have circled around me. No smiley for sarcasm. Remember if you don't already know, our esteemed (by some) bee leader in Gainsville, Fl. will tell you that all bees not in a white box are suspect, the queen to be immediately replaced, the preference is destroying all swarms. This is due to the media and his fear of outlawing (or severely restricting) keeping bees in Fl. due to sensationalism by the media. Also all hives to be requeened every 6 months.

G3farms
Oct 21st 2010, 07:15 PM
I am so fortunate they have circled around me. No smiley for sarcasm. Remember if you don't already know, our esteemed (by some) bee leader in Gainsville, Fl. will tell you that all bees not in a white box are suspect, the queen to be immediately replaced, the preference is destroying all swarms. This is due to the media and his fear of outlawing (or severely restricting) keeping bees in Fl. due to sensationalism by the media. Also all hives to be requeened every 6 months.


Sounds more like he owns stock in a queen breeding outfit.

tecumseh
Oct 22nd 2010, 05:14 AM
Mr Hayes (sp???) is making the very best of a bad situation. if it comes down to a decision to take say 1000 migratory beekeepers (who spend very little money... there use to be a joke in Florida concerning this kind of tight wad behavior) or 1 million well healed snow birds (snow birds being anyone who migrates to Florida for the winter)... how do you think that decision will turn out?

I am not privey to Mr. Hayes resume but what little I do know suggest he is a very good bee keeper. I quite often recommend an old article in the ABJ for consideration to all new beekeepers who were searching for an answer to some strategy to limit swarming which (unknown to me until recently) Mr. Hayes penned (long ago).