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rast
May 7th 2011, 08:56 PM
Do you think this wax paper covering one side of a frame of brood comb would work? I only want the queen to lay on one side. The problem I foresee is getting her on it on day 1.

http://i399.photobucket.com/albums/pp79/RAST01/HOPKINS1001.jpg

http://i399.photobucket.com/albums/pp79/RAST01/HOPKINS1002.jpg

Iddee
May 7th 2011, 09:46 PM
It should work. You will need to check it daily to see when day one is.

PerryBee
May 8th 2011, 05:57 AM
Good pics, interesting idea. :D

rast
May 8th 2011, 06:21 AM
Frame holder & spacer

http://i399.photobucket.com/albums/pp79/RAST01/HOPKINS2001.jpg


http://i399.photobucket.com/albums/pp79/RAST01/HOPKINS2002.jpg

PerryBee
May 8th 2011, 07:31 AM
Thanks rast:
They say a picture is worth a thousand words! :thumbsup:
Is that spacer for an 8 frame box? What is the depth of your spacer, mine are 1 1/2"?
Do you do anything to fill the area around the frame to discourage burr comb or is it not needed due to short time frame?

G3farms
May 8th 2011, 07:38 AM
I'm lost, what is the spacer thing for?

Does it sit on top of the hive box with the frame on its side for the queen to lay in?? :confused: :confused:

That pic may be worth a thousand words but can somebody type them in for me.

rast
May 8th 2011, 07:45 AM
Yes, 8 frame. I've never tried this before. Not to worried about burr comb. Frame has to be high enough so there is room for cells to hang down and not be against the tops of the frames below.

Yes G3, a frame with 4 day larva is supported on its side above a queenless hive.

PerryBee
May 8th 2011, 07:47 AM
Hey G3:

I believe the queen would have already laid eggs in the frame before it is put in the hive in this manner!

G3farms
May 8th 2011, 07:52 AM
awwww I see said the blind man. Is that why you only want to have the queen lay eggs on one side of the frame?

PerryBee
May 8th 2011, 07:55 AM
I would think the eggs on the "upside" would be lost (wasted).
This looks like it would be something even I might try at some point!

crackerbee
May 10th 2011, 08:39 PM
Yes, 8 frame. I've never tried this before. Not to worried about burr comb. Frame has to be high enough so there is room for cells to hang down and not be against the tops of the frames below.

Yes G3, a frame with 4 day larva is supported on its side above a queenless hive.



Does the comb side face down or up like in the pic,and if the comb does down,how much space is there between the comb and frames below?

tecumseh
May 11th 2011, 04:55 AM
a crackerbee snip...
Does the comb side face down or up like in the pic,and if the comb does down,how much space is there between the comb and frames below?

tecumseh:
the side of interest is the side facing downward. the slot and the nails on the rim are for spacing the frame just slightly above the cluster. the distance between the frame's face and the cluster below would be critical considerations I would think. too low and the cells could get attached to the top bars and then possible broken when the frame or rim is removed.

also if it was me I think I would attempt this only on pure wax foundation and preferable some comb that is almost new (ie not black). the first consideration is that you will need to cut (with a knife) out the queen cells all the way through the mid rib of the frame. plastic frame obviously would not work and old comb can be tough to cut accurately.

you could employ one of Jay Smith's (<one of tecumseh boy hood hero's) methods and score the underside of the frame with a flat device (like a flat screwdriver) and thereby allow some spacing between the finished cells. his technique was to leave one row (of eggs) and smash two rows (in both direction). Jay Smith method was to cut long strips of eggs from fairly new foundation and then attach these strips to bars for starting.

crackerbee
May 11th 2011, 07:27 AM
Thanks for the info Tec

Iddee
May 11th 2011, 08:43 AM
Rast, it took me a few days to find it, but would a larger version of this work?

It works well for queen introduction and I've thought about trying a larger one to requeen a laying worker hive, but haven't done it yet.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j226/Iddee/Queenintroduction.jpg

rast
May 11th 2011, 05:34 PM
1. Tec is correct (as usual) about the spacing. I used a queen cell protector +1/8" to achieve my spacing.
2. " " " " " about the comb. I used nice white soft comb. The hard black was for fitting only.
3. Installed on Sun. afternoon. Queen was immediately adjacent to installed comb. Checked yesterday (Tues.), no eggs, but the bees were destroying the wax paper. That probably is not going to work.

Iddee, I thought of that, but hoping to keep it simpler. Thanks though. I know this will work, We have just got to get the bugs out. (or in :) )

G3farms
May 11th 2011, 08:42 PM
Rast since you are wanting to use new drawn comb and only need one side of it, could you cut a piece of 1/4" paneling and fit it over one side of a frame of foundation. The bees could only get to one side to draw it out, then after eggs are placed in the newly drawn cells pull it out and put it in your Hopkins frame.

Iddee I was thinking the same thing of caging the queen to one whole side of your frame.

tecumseh
May 12th 2011, 05:35 AM
there are of course a number of variation of the 'theme' rast is pursing here. one means of getting eggs into the frame on some time line is to restrict the queen (via queen excluder material) to 2 or 3 frames at one time <think of as a prison made of queen excluder material on the sides, top and bottom and you rotate a comb in an out of the prison one frame on a daily basis. another 'system' reduces the laying patch on a frame to a small window. another (which I found quite fascination) employ a mold for 'foundation' made extra thick that had cells set just slighly deeper (1 deep and 2 regular in both direction with slightly deeper meaning perhaps 1/4") than standard foundation. you destroyed the eggs/larvae in the regular cells and reared queens from those in the deeper cells.

rast
May 13th 2011, 04:10 PM
could you cut a piece of 1/4" paneling and fit it over one side of a frame of foundation. The bees could only get to one side to draw it out, then after eggs are placed in the newly drawn cells pull it out and put it in your Hopkins frame.
Yes G3, I was thinking about using coroplast. That sign stuff.

G3farms
May 14th 2011, 01:13 AM
coroplast, of course!!

I was just thinking today how handy that stuff is.
I built some of the 5 frame plywood nucs that are not painted yet and use it for a waterproof roof on the
top of the lid.

tecumseh
May 14th 2011, 06:35 AM
worth mentioning I would guess as an alternative...

I see Jerry Freeman (of Freeman's beetle trap fame) has an advertisement in the ABJ of a cell punch with a brochure for those folks interested in queen rearing that do not wish to graft.