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View Full Version : Trying my hand a queen rearing



trinibee
Sep 27th 2011, 01:32 PM
Hi all,

I'm thinking about about doing some queens/nucs using the following method. just wanted to get some feed back on what you all think...

1. queen rearing utilizing the EZI queen system to produce QC.
2. cell development utilizing the the Cloake board method.
3. introduce QCs to a queen castle in the 2-frame configuration with both pollen substitutes and syrup fed from above each compartment.
4. after the queen have started laying i plan to give each queen an additional frame(or 2)of sealed brood by moving all the nucs into four frame nuc boxes so that the nuc can continue to build up. planning to do this about 2 weeks after the she starts to lay. the 2 frame nucs will be made up of a frame sealed brood and a frame of open brood with as much young bees as possible.

i'm planning to continue feeding until the nucs are at least 8-10 frame

what do you all think?

Americasbeekeeper
Sep 27th 2011, 04:43 PM
All of the queen rearing packages are good. Grafting is much quicker and more reliable once you learn.
Cell development is a two part with a cell starter and a cell finisher. Cloake boards are optional. Getting the queen out of the super with the queen cells is most important. You would not believe how often she is there!
Mating and production check plan is spot on!

tecumseh
Sep 28th 2011, 03:46 AM
a snip:
2. cell development utilizing the the Cloake board method.

tecumseh:
usually called cell starting and cell finishing. the Cloake board method does both in one box.

another snip:
4. after the queen have started laying i plan to give each queen an additional frame(or 2)of sealed brood by moving all the nucs into four frame nuc boxes so that the nuc can continue to build up. planning to do this about 2 weeks after the she starts to lay. the 2 frame nucs will be made up of a frame sealed brood and a frame of open brood with as much young bees as possible.

tecumseh:
I am not sure why you might think you need to add sealed brood to a unit with a laying queen unless something is amiss??? given the variation in the development of new queens a two week lag with only two frames in the box might be a bit too late. ideally I would rather have three frames than 2 and at least one with some feed component. my looser rule is to have just enough frames for the bees to cover the frames nicely. in the prime nectar collecting season I would also like to have one new frame with just foundation.

ps... eventually you will want to learn to graft. difficult the first time but it gets progressively easier. an alternative to grafting is a cell punch which is actually a variation on a egg transferring technique which I first read about in one of Jay Smith's (<perhaps the greatest queen breeder of his day) old books. mr freedman of freedman's beetle traps now has a small book he sells on the use of a cell punch.

trinibee
Sep 28th 2011, 08:51 AM
hey tecumseh tnx u. I'll definitely be looking into those books

My reasoning for adding the frame of sealed brood is to try and boost the number of bees in the nuc so that it develops faster.
The two week period was just to give the queen time to settle into her laying pattern. But I'll consider making 3 frame nucs instead as per your recommendation.

this is the first time I'm going to be utilizing the cloake board method though so I'm hoping that it works out well. I'm always one to try new things with my bees do I'll definitely try grafting once the nucs that I'm planning to make are strong enough.

Oh, americasbeekeeper, I'll definitely keep an eye out for the queen

tecumseh
Sep 28th 2011, 05:36 PM
Jay Smith books (I think there were two) are extremely rare and extremely hard to put your hands on. at one time I think Michael Bush of BushFarms had one of his books transcribed on to his web site.... not certain if it is still there or not.

Jay Smith basic idea was to force the queen mother (the hive from which you plan to rear queen from) to lay on almost new wax foundation just barely drawn. He then cut the eggs out using an razor knife into long strips that he then attached to standard queen cell bars. after attachment he would leave one cell and smash two all the way down the stip... this simply allowed for some space between the queen cells so that they could be removed safely.

I hope you get the idea???

Walt B
Sep 28th 2011, 06:58 PM
The Jay Smith books I found are expensive, but available on Alibris:

http://www.alibris.com/booksearch?keyword=jay+smith+bees&mtype=B&hs.x=33&hs.y=6

Walt

Iddee
Sep 28th 2011, 07:56 PM
Amazon has them for 12.50


http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss? ... &x=13&y=17 (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?field-keywords=Better+Queens+%96++by+Smith%2C+Jay&url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&x=13&y=17)

trinibee
Sep 29th 2011, 01:53 PM
hey tnx. books should be here by monday :-)