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beetree
Apr 23rd 2012, 02:17 PM
how do you get that last bit of honey out of wax and then melt wax for other use such as soaps, candles, etc?

Omie
Apr 23rd 2012, 03:14 PM
Some folks with lots of hives make a solar wax melter or other arrangements.

On a very small scale however, here's what I do:
Get a cheap aluminum or steel pot at a garage sale that you keep just for wax (no teflon or coatings). put your globs of leftover wax in it and add about twice as much water. Leave it on LOW for a while till the wax melts. Stir it, then let it cool completely. The junk and the leftover honey will magically all mix down into the water, and the pure wax will float and harden as a beautiful solid wax disc on the top. Then you just lift up the disc. For extra pure, change the water and do it a second time.

This is the wax I got from 4 medium frames using the crush&strain method, enough for several votive candles:
3435

3436

Americasbeekeeper
Apr 23rd 2012, 08:09 PM
Welcome BT! The bees will get every bit of honey out if you leave it near the hives. Slow heat is best to melt the wax. A solar melter is the absolute best. A crock pot works good just do not get caught using it without permission which you will probably not get anyway.

G3farms
Apr 24th 2012, 02:47 AM
I am working on a video of a solar wax melter, just a few more weeks til it is done.

Find an old crock pot at a garage sale or the good will store for cheap, they work great also. Self contained, thermostat control, nothing to clean up either (clean out, yes.......clean up, no).

tecumseh
Apr 24th 2012, 03:52 AM
about the only low tech way of getting the last bit of sticky out of the honey is as Americasbeekeeper describes. I am of course assuming here you do not have $10000 to spend on the high tech solution to this problem.

efmesch
Apr 25th 2012, 07:11 AM
If you use any of the heating methods suggested (as opposed to letting the bees clean out the cappings directly), remember that the heated honey, straight or diluted, can bee used to feed hungry bees. Don't just spill it out!!
As to letting the bees eat directly from the wet cappings, beware, leaving them out in the open can create quite a frenzy of bees collecting the drippings. I've read that this method leads to subsequent robbing. When I feed capppings directly to the bees, I do it by spreading the cappings INSIDE an empty super on top of a cover with an accesss hole for the bees of only that one hive to reach.

Iddee
Apr 25th 2012, 07:31 AM
During a honey flow, the cappings can be placed anywhere and it will not cause robbing.

During a dearth, open feeding of any kind near the hives will definitely cause robbing.

riverbee
Apr 25th 2012, 08:35 AM
beetree;how do you get that last bit of honey out of wax and then melt wax for other use such as soaps, candles, etc?

i take the cappings (spun out from a cappings bag in the extractor) and throw them in a paint strainer bag. i fill a 5 gallon pail with water and slosh the strainer bag with the cappings in it around, and run more water through the bucket until the water is clear. i let the cappings air dry using a huge strainer or tub. (of course this is all done outside with a garden hose, and not in the kitchen....:grin:

i built my own solar wax melter, these work excellent. i can post photos of my solar melter, and the bricks of wax, if you would like.

Gypsi
Jun 6th 2012, 04:43 PM
Please post photos of your solar wax melter Riverbee! I'm hoping it's useful for very small amounts of wax.

I'm guessing old brood comb is better suited to traps or the trash can than for candles, if someone could post an answer to that ?

Gypsi

PerryBee
Jun 6th 2012, 05:35 PM
Really old brood comb has so much cacoon residue in it, it usually creates more of a mess than it's worth.
Solar melter? Here's mine, converted my wife's cold frame. :mrgreen:

http://i664.photobucket.com/albums/vv1/PerryBee/PicturesNov09017.jpg http://i664.photobucket.com/albums/vv1/PerryBee/PicturesNov09018.jpg
http://i664.photobucket.com/albums/vv1/PerryBee/PicturesNov09032.jpg http://i664.photobucket.com/albums/vv1/PerryBee/PicturesNov09033.jpg

riverbee
Jun 6th 2012, 05:56 PM
nice cold frame perry!

gypsy:
"Please post photos of your solar wax melter Riverbee! I'm hoping it's useful for very small amounts of wax.
I'm guessing old brood comb is better suited to traps or the trash can than for candles, if someone could post an answer to that ?"

yes, i can post a couple pix with a description, give me a little time to 'comb' my pc and check back, or i will send you a pm.
about the brood comb, depends on the age, sometimes as perry said it's not worth it, ummm, full of junk and running it through a number of times to get it clean, and of course darker wax, suitable for candles i guess, but not lip balm. :grin:

riverrat
Jun 6th 2012, 05:59 PM
I moved this on over to the general beekeeping forum think it will get more replies. Great looking pics of wax :thumbsup:

Gypsi
Jun 6th 2012, 06:08 PM
So the cookie sheet has a hole in it, letting the wax drip through into the pan? Heat, I got. Solar heat, I got. Cookie sheet and pan are doable too. I can even put it "under glass", I have a spare storm window that doesn't fit any of my windows. Thank you! Nice pics.

Gypsi

PerryBee
Jun 6th 2012, 06:35 PM
Waste not, want not! :thumbsup:
I just used an old cookie sheet, cut a 1 inch piece out the middle of the lip on one end, bent the sheet into a slight V shape, and put a small piece of #8 hardware cloth over the slot to act as a strainer.

Iddee
Jun 6th 2012, 08:27 PM
Curiosity question, Rat. Why the general forum and not the hive products forum?

Barbarian
Jun 6th 2012, 11:32 PM
I add the wax to a bucket of clean cold water and stir. Leave overnight then empty through a kitchen strainer. Shake to get rid of a bit more water. Spread the damp wax thinly on sheets of newspaper and leave to air dry (my greenhouse). The dry wax crumb goes into the solar wax extractor.

It is a fiddle but little extra on the utilities bill. :idea:

riverbee
Jun 7th 2012, 09:50 PM
my solar wax melter, i have a couple of these, and one smaller. It’s lined with galvanized tin, no insulation and has an oven thermometer. the window was a throw away and is hinged on, and also the box is lined with weather seal where the frame of the window meets the box.

materials for melting and filtering:
aluminum weber grill pans or turkery roaster pans
1/4” hardware cloth
black window screening
threadbare t-shirts or cheesecloth
milk cartons
binder clips large and small

this one i can melt deep frames and queen excluders in if need be, large and small amounts of cappings or scrapings. i clean the wax first as described earlier in my post # 8. i use ¼” hardware cloth clipped to an aluminum weber grill pan or turkey roaster pan. the hardware cloth I curl up at the bottom to catch any melting wax that might slide forward and fall into the milk carton. the clips are those black metal thingy’s to clip large amounts of paper together with. on top the hardware cloth i place a layer of black window screen ( clipped together on top the hardware cloth). the window screen is excellent to use as it catches most of the junk so it is not draining to the bottom of the weber pan, or into the milk carton. i shape the weber pan to pour the melting wax into a milk carton. on top of the milk carton, i clip a threadbare t-shirt or several layers of cheese cloth, this acts as an additional filter. when the melting wax drains through the window screen, the hardware cloth and the threadbare t-shirt material, the wax comes out very clean. depending on how clean it is, i will run it through again. the sun bleaches the wax. when the brick cools, i just cut the carton and peel the brick out. i store the wax bricks in ziplocs in a plastic tub, and in a cool dry place.

what’s nice is black window screening is inexpensive and a very good initial filter, so i just remove it because it is full of junk, throw it out and start with a new piece for the next batch of cappings or wax i melt. i do the same with the threadbare t-shirt. When the hardware cloth gets a little gunky, i just hit it with a propane torch, cleans it right up and can re-use it.

i use 2 different sizes of weber pans, the largest one to pile on cappings or scrapings. once the wax is melted and in a brick, or for smaller amounts of wax, i will use a smaller aluminum pan. all with the window screen, hardware cloth, and threadbare material/cheesecloth. some beeks use bounty paper towel to filter the wax. my experience with this is, that it soaks up to much melting wax and can run over the side. an old threadbare t-shirt/cheesecloth works much better for filtering, and can be used as fire starters.

i like the smaller bricks of wax , they are easier to store, cut , break apart, or grate to melt down for various projects, candles, lip balm etc.

there is a simple method, though i have never tried but heard very good results with, and you can use an old cooler, or a styrofoam cooler to do it with a window on top sort of like perry’s cold frame:
paul magnuson simple solar melter (https://sites.google.com/a/nwabeekeepers.com/www/beekeeping/solar-wax-melter)

hope this helps, enjoy, i have a variety of simple box plans for solar melters. Click on the pics for larger views......

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4292 4293 4294

4295

Barbarian
Jun 8th 2012, 04:04 AM
Nice pictures, Riverbee. Your extractor is much smarter than mine.

When I put frames in the extractor, the joints seemed to shrink and get wobbly. I now cut the comb out to put in the extractor.

It can get very hot in the extractor so some excluders will distort in the heat.

I find that paper kitchen towel is good as a final filter.

riverbee
Jun 8th 2012, 10:07 AM
thanks barbarian,
"When I put frames in the extractor, the joints seemed to shrink and get wobbly. I now cut the comb out to put in the extractor.
It can get very hot in the extractor so some excluders will distort in the heat."

well i think if i put my frames in an EXTRACTOR and my joints shrunk and were wobbly, or cut the comb and put it in the EXTRACTOR, that might be a messy operation, and if my EXTRACTOR got hot, i think i would throw it out or buy a new motor for it :lol:

anyway, i haven't had any heat issues with the excluders or frames, but my excluders are wood frames and metal. amazing how fast these are cleaned up.

paper towel does work well as a filter, i think it soaks up too much wax vs. threadbare material or cheese cloth, the melting wax gathers pretty much in the center and does not soak up to the end like paper towel does.

another method for filtering is to use a paint strainer bag that fits a 5 gallon bucket. throw cappings in it and lay it on top of your hardware cloth. it works the same as window screen.

Iddee
Jun 8th 2012, 10:23 AM
Riverbee, Barbarian calls the melter a wax extractor. Difference in the motherland and the colonies. "D

riverbee
Jun 8th 2012, 11:00 AM
iddee,
i thought this might be the case with our good beeks across the pond, i couldn't resist the temptation to poke fun at the 'motherland' :grin:

Gypsi
Jun 8th 2012, 11:11 AM
Wow. I might have a cup of beeswax all told at the moment. (this could change.) Will see what I have that I might be able to build with.

Slightly off topic, but what is a cold frame for? Starting veggies in cold weather? Because I saw one when walking my dogs today, and we don't have cold weather. My neighbor isn't around to ask.

Gypsi

Slowmodem
Jun 8th 2012, 11:34 AM
Slightly off topic, but what is a cold frame for? Starting veggies in cold weather? Because I saw one when walking my dogs today, and we don't have cold weather. My neighbor isn't around to ask.

Gypsi

a mini-greenhouse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold_frame)

Gypsi
Jun 8th 2012, 12:52 PM
I have a big greenhouse. Think I'm going with my cooler or something. Black screen I have. 1/8th inch hardware cloth I have. Old Tshirts I really have. But the rinsed cappings still have a bit o honey or sugar water in them trying to mold, and wax moths are going to love them, so back to soak and build some kind of contraption!

Iddee
Jun 8th 2012, 02:48 PM
A piece of screen over a metal container and set in the oven at 200 for a few minutes should do the job on that small an amount.

Gypsi
Jun 8th 2012, 02:51 PM
Iddee - that sounds good. Only my personal oven is the sun, I'm thinking setting it in my cooler might help the baking process.

(I actually gave my stove away last year - electric range with oven....cost too much to run. I love my induction cooktop but I got wax all over it the last time I used it to melt..)

Gypsi

Iddee
Jun 8th 2012, 03:20 PM
Then do the same in a solar oven....... A box with a piece of glass on top, or the dash of a vehicle with the windows closed.

Slowmodem
Jun 8th 2012, 07:57 PM
Since I only extracted 10 medium frames, I'm trying the crockpot method (my wife probably thinks is a crackpot method). Hopefully I'll have a wax cake in the morning. :)

Here's the cappings in the crockpot:

43224323



I had a strainer from a 5-gallon bucket that had wax that was very hard to get out, so I set it on top of the crockpot for a little while so the heat and steam would loosen it up some. It worked great.

4321

riverbee
Jun 8th 2012, 09:26 PM
gypsi said:
"Think I'm going with my cooler or something. the rinsed cappings still have a bit o honey or sugar water in them trying to mold, and wax moths are going to love them, so back to soak and build some kind of contraption!".

gypsi, run the cold water through them until the water runs clear, there won't be any honey residue left in them. i think a cooler would work, and heard that it does, with an old window or something over the top, the link i posted earlier with my pix, paul magnuson, simple solar wax melter.

greg said:
"I'm trying the crockpot method (my wife probably thinks is a crackpot method)"
riverbee.....:rotfl:! build yourself a solar unit for next year, you will love it!

i forgot to include in my post the design i sort of followed to build mine, two pdfs for building plans, one like mine to adjust the size to your liking (an old window works just fine than the window that is built for it), and a 'mini' unit:

solar wax melter (http://www.tc.umn.edu/%7Ereute001/Plan%20files/pSolar%20Wax%20Melter.pdf)

mini solar wax melter (http://www.tc.umn.edu/%7Ereute001/Plan%20files/pSolar%20Wax%20Melter%20mini.pdf)

Gypsi
Jun 8th 2012, 09:55 PM
woohoo! Robbed the bee tree stump - more wax after I clean up their honey! I have got to unstop my kitchen drain from the beeswax that I think got in from the last couple of soakings on my tiny amount of wax. This really is an OUTDOOR activity. Where the wax moths live, unfortunately. Maybe a bucket with lid activity.....

Solar energy is not in short supply in Texas. Cardboard box, window, screen over metal try with slot into wax collecting vessel of some kind. Probably the metal bowl I've been using. But I can just see the wax dripping off the screen missing the bowl if I don't have a tray under it.

Gypsi

Slowmodem
Jun 9th 2012, 03:29 PM
I crocked the wax overnight and let it cool today. Here is the water that was left:

4348

Here is the bottom of the wax (the water side):

4349

And here is the side that was up (air side):

4347

It looks like a lot of the stuff didn't separate and sink. perhaps I need to do it again with clean water?

efmesch
Jun 9th 2012, 04:18 PM
Why do you people want to remove the honey residues from the wax before melting it down in a solar wax extractor?
I thorw it all into my wax extractor. In the collecting container I put several centimeters of water. The honey melts and mixes in the water. The solid, non wax waste materials sink to the bottom and the wax floats on top. After everything cools I remove the wax and take the water-honey mixture for feeding the bees (this is not the same as feeding the bees sugar syrup). The interface between the wax and the honey/water looks like Greg's second picture. The non desired materials can be removed by another melting and filtration or by simply scraping it off.

Slowmodem
Jun 9th 2012, 05:33 PM
The interface between the wax and the honey/water looks like Greg's second picture. The non desired materials can be removed by another melting and filtration or by simply scraping it off.

Thanks, Efmesch! I believe this is the course I will try. Do I filter it while the wax is melted? What should I use?

efmesch
Jun 9th 2012, 11:50 PM
Several of the previous replies (riverbee, baarbarian, etc. ) mentioned their filtration methods. I really have no better suggestions to offer. I would place the filter at the "spout" where the wax leaves the hot surface, to drip down into the collecting containerl I might add though, the gradual slope on my solar wax extractor, on which the melted wax flows slowly, has a tendency to hold back some (far from all) of the waste materials on their way down. When things are cooled down, I clean them off the metal slope with a scraper.

riverbee
Jun 10th 2012, 09:05 PM
ef said:
"Why do you people want to remove the honey residues from the wax before melting it down in a solar wax extractor?"

ef, i do it because i will get much cleaner wax the first time through with no scraping whatsoever, and you are scraping wax mixed with debris. if i do not wash the wax clean of honey and debris, some of this will filter into the milk carton and get trapped in the wax. also, while i am washing the wax clean, alot of junk floats to the top, and i can pick it off easily, or darker wax, and can pick it out and throw it in a separate container, but the window screen catches pretty much everything. when i run it through, i want clean wax without scraping. if i run it through a second time it is because i want the wax a little lighter and/or debris was trapped in the brick. there is no need to put water in the milk carton using the method i use for filtering wax. it is very clean, and there is no scraping. what does the bottom of your brick look like after running it through? it will be dirty or covered with debris, requiring as you said a 'remelt'?

greg,
i looked at your photos, i have never used the crock pot method, so i cannot give you advise on this other than to say as ef did, or to use a double boiler method with some sort of container sold for candle wax melting, or a large pyrex....break it up into the container, heat it in the double boiler, and when the wax is liquid, pour it through some cheese cloth, or other filtration into a clean container....., you may have to do this a couple times, not sure,just my guess on this?
anyway, hope i made sense on this....:grin:

efmesch
Jun 11th 2012, 12:21 AM
Riverbee,
There's no denying that you'll get a lighter wax and less debris if you wash out the honey first. My "gripe" is about the lost honey. Often, a fair amount of honey is trapped in the wax cappings and, to my frugal manner of thinking, it seems to be a waste not to use it for feeding back to the bees or for other purposes.
An alternative to washing could be placing the wet cappings on a hive cover, inside an upper empty super which is covered with another inner cover and a roof. The bees will go up, clean out all the honey and take it down below. When they are finished you simply take the dry cappings (which, if needed, can be washed from remaining debris) and melt them down.
My last alternative suggestion is to "wash" the cappings in a large vessel, strain out the wax for melting down and use the honey-water to make mead.

Slowmodem
Jun 11th 2012, 05:26 AM
I stuck a meat thermometer into the wax solution last night. It was 180 degrees. I think my crockpot may get too hot on low. That may be why the wax is turning brown. But it's cooling now, and so I'll see how this second heating turns out. There was a lot of gunk in the bottom of the water that I poured out the last time. I'll keep you posted.

riverbee
Jun 11th 2012, 09:02 AM
ef:
"There's no denying that you'll get a lighter wax and less debris if you wash out the honey first. My "gripe" is about the lost honey. Often, a fair amount of honey is trapped in the wax cappings and, to my frugal manner of thinking, it seems to be a waste not to use it for feeding back to the bees or for other purposes."

ef, i use cappings baskets in my extractor.....it slings out the majority of the honey. for me ef, it is not practical or wise to set wax cappings out to be cleaned up, because of the volume, time involved, bears....to name a few kinks, but i do understand what you are saying.

greg,
180 degrees is too hot. was the water boiling at all? i would think this would darken the wax. as i said, i haven't used this method so am just guessing?

Slowmodem
Jun 12th 2012, 11:29 AM
I have a warming unit on the stove (down south, we call a unit on the stove an eye). It is a low heat unit that is used to keep food warm until the meal is served or the rest of the meal is prepared. I found an old all metal coffee can (they are very hard to find anymore) in the pantry. I put some hot water in it (140F) from the faucet and put it on the warming unit. It maintained 140 ok. So I put the wax in there (plus a little extra burr comb I found) and am melting it again, to see if I can get some more of the impurities out of it.

It's taking a long time to melt (so I turned it up just a bit), but that's ok. I have time. LOL Hopefully this week or weekend, I'll make a solar melter and be ready for the next time I have wax. (or, I could remelt this wax again since it's just a testing session).

riverbee
Jun 12th 2012, 02:40 PM
greg, i am familiar with the southerner's 'eye's'.........:lol:

what does your wife think of all your experiments in the kitchen?!!!:grin:
i have read that you could also use a double boiler type method........ask your wife for the electric frying pan, put water in it, and put the wax in the biggest measuring cup you have, or other heatable, pourable container. put the container in the water bath and set the temperature on the frying pan. when the wax melts, filter it through whatever material you are using into another container.

good luck on building the solar unit!

Isleño
Jun 15th 2012, 03:37 AM
how do you get that last bit of honey out of wax and then melt wax for other use such as soaps, candles, etc?
If your location/time of the year provides reasonably good and warm sun light, the simplest way would be to separate wax from residual honey with a solar wax melter. This is a rather simple device which can be made in a few hours. It renders wax of excellent quality, eventhough the honey comes out rather dark (I normally give it back to my bees with a Boardman feeder).
Other method could be to allow the bees to clean the wax for you, by simply exposing the cappings (I assume this is the source of your question) in the apiary late in the evening to lessen the possibility of creating a "riot" or "feeding frenzy". Once the bees finish with the last vestige of honey, would be a good idea to rinse the wax and then melt it in a double boiler (one big container with the water and a smaller one with the wax, inside the big one) NEVER melt the wax in a container directly expose to the heat source, be it from gas, electricity, etc.
Hope this helps,
Best regards,
Isleno

efmesch
Jun 15th 2012, 04:33 AM
Isleno, Welcome to the forum.:hi: Glad to hear from you and see that you quickly joined into the thread. I'm sure we'll be able to learn a lot from you as you post.

Slowmodem
Jun 17th 2012, 09:21 AM
I'm still experimenting with it. Haven't had time to build a solar extractor yet. Still not getting the results I want using the stove or crockpot. Probably something simple I'm not seeing or understanding. Anyways, I will endeavor to persevere!

Murrell
Jun 17th 2012, 12:18 PM
I'm still experimenting with it. Haven't had time to build a solar extractor yet. Still not getting the results I want using the stove or crockpot. Probably something simple I'm not seeing or understanding. Anyways, I will endeavor to persevere!

I mostly use a $2 crockpot.
Are you straining the wax after it is melted ?
Pouring it thru a nylon stocking will get 90 or so percent of the impurities, after that strain thru a paper towel, should get it near perfect.

Also have a solar setup with screen wire in melting pan, drips thru nylon,then paper towel, works good, but takes time to set up and use.

Murrell

riverbee
Jun 17th 2012, 09:44 PM
gregs post:
"Still not getting the results I want using the stove or crockpot."

greg, i am not a crockpot expert on the wax, you have way more patience than i do with that method. maybe do as murrell suggested with the straining. i would most likely have wax burns from pouring or spilling, because my middle name is not grace....:lol:
once you try a solar melter, you will like it. you don't have to be fancy schmancy. google the 'paul magnuson simple solar wax melter', (from my post #17), this works in a cooler, and same concept as perry posted with his cold frame.

murrell said: "Also have a solar setup with screen wire in melting pan, drips thru nylon,then paper towel, works good, but takes time to set up and use."

murrell i don't know what your 'set up' time is, but my solar unit is always ready to go, new screen over the hardware cloth (pre cut), new thread bare material(pre cut) over the milk carton, close the lid, wait several hours, done. i can melt alot of wax in one day; can run numerous batches of wax through in a day. would think messing around with a crock pot would be more time consuming than the solar unit, and no pouring, but don't know. the plus with solar units is the nice bleaching from the sun and one time through with the method i described in my earlier post # 17, gets very clean wax.

Barbarian
Jun 17th 2012, 10:34 PM
I'm still waiting for an elusive celestial body. .:roll:

Slowmodem
Jun 18th 2012, 04:54 AM
I'm going going to get a styrofoam cooler and a piece of glass today. I found some videos and websites about it yesterday. I think I've figured out what the deal is (hopefully). When I tried to strain it in the house, it cooled and clogged the strainer. In the solar melter, it stays hot throughout the process and will strain completely. With my luck, it will rain all week. LOL

Gypsi
Jun 18th 2012, 07:33 AM
Sad thing - I broke down and glued to interior of my garage door all of my old fish boxes last november, to make room in the garage and shed. Your pet store has these, probably to give away, big wide square styrofoam coolers. Hopefully a local fish store has one for me. Now I find a use for the darned things..

Gypsi

PerryBee
Jun 18th 2012, 09:49 AM
I'm still waiting for an elusive celestial body. .:roll:

:mrgreen: :lol: :rolling: :wink:

efmesch
Jun 18th 2012, 10:25 AM
I spent a long time trying to understand the joke--and then I finally thought back to the cloudy year I spent in England over 20 years ago and it came to me. Yup--I suppose a solar wax extractor in England can be a very "sometimes thing".
It's a sad laugh. :???:

Slowmodem
Jun 18th 2012, 06:56 PM
Well, I got a cooler, plexiglass, black paint and ambition. So tomorrow I'll put it together and see what happens. Pictures at 11.................

riverbee
Jun 18th 2012, 09:14 PM
gypsi said:
"I broke down and glued to interior of my garage door all of my old fish boxes last november"

gypsi, when i first read your post i thought you meant your old fish tanks, so i am trying to picture gluing glass fish tank peices to the interior of a garage door :lol:
:doh:
then i read "styrofoam coolers"......

greg's post:
"Well, I got a cooler, plexiglass, black paint and ambition. So tomorrow I'll put it together and see what happens. Pictures at 11"

waiting to see those pictures greg!

efmesch
Jun 18th 2012, 10:30 PM
Well, I got a cooler, plexiglass, black paint and ambition. So tomorrow I'll put it together and see what happens. Pictures at 11.................

What's people's experience with plexiglass as opposed to glass glass? Does it become misshapen from the heat? Does it lose its transparency from the heat? Does it change color and become less efficient at letting the sun's heating rays through?

Slowmodem
Jun 19th 2012, 09:42 AM
Well, I put it together this morning and it is "working" now. :)

First I got black thumbs painting the cooler:

4507

Here's the finished product:

4508

Here's the "bucket" that has a little water in the bottom with a paper towel and rubber band:

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Here's the wax (that's been melted several times in my trials and many errors):

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Here it is all loaded in the melter with a piece of foil in the bottom:

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and here it is in action:

4506

I'll go out this afternoon and see how it's doing. My dad said, "That will take a while." and I said, "Yeah, but it's cheap!"

riverbee
Jun 19th 2012, 10:21 AM
beeeutiful :grin:

had to chuckle about the painting of the cooler! you will like the wax brick that comes out!

Barbarian
Jun 19th 2012, 10:24 AM
For efmesch ----- I prefer 2 sheets of glass. Works better than inner glass and outer plexiglass. Reclaimed double glazing (2 sheets of glass) units are good but I find that the heat stresses eventually crack the inner sheet.

The heat is such that some grades of polystyrene will melt/deform. Lining the interior with thin ply can help to stop this yet retaining the insulation.

Gypsi
Jun 19th 2012, 12:41 PM
Since it is about 95 degrees out, I think I'm going with a cardboard box, old tshirt filter over a plastic bowl with some water in it, and some windowscreen holding the wax, all under my spare storm window that doesn't fit my windows, lol

Not high tech, but we will see if it works.

Slowmodem
Jun 19th 2012, 01:55 PM
Here's some more pictures:

This is the top of the filter after the wax went through. The video I saw on this said to save this paper towel, that it's good for getting the smoker going. (sounds good to me!)

4512

This is just a picture of the melter out in the yard.

4513

This is the wax out of the tub in the kitchen:

4514

4515

It finally came out right. :D Now, when I harvest the next honey, I know what to do with the wax! :)

Gypsi
Jun 19th 2012, 02:07 PM
OK, I went with the cheap "on hand" way. Had a cardboard box, NOT wrecking my plastic cooler. (as it is I think wax and my kitchen drain had a dispute and I'll be digging up a line over it.)

Plastic bowl, clothespins hold old tshirt 2 layers over the bowl, about an inch of water in the bottom. I rinsed the wax 2 or 3 times, the screen strained rinse water is in my beefeed pitcher loaded with pollen from the look of it. Anyway, bowl, screen folded so point is over center of bowl, anchored to top of box, point is an inch or 2 above tshirt. Tin foil pan slightly tipped, piled the comb in it. Found a sheet of glass twice the size of the box that's been in my garage 5 years, cut in half, taped edges, put on box. Whole thing is on my front sidewalk, the one up by my house, in the sun.

I rinsed everything outdoors this time. Thinking I could add some sugar to the rinse stuff and use it for bee feed. Opinions?

Gypsi

Gypsi
Jun 19th 2012, 02:24 PM
4516Wax melter hopefully melting wax.

Slowmodem
Jun 19th 2012, 02:39 PM
With the sun and the temperature in TX, I'm sure it'll do fine. :)

Gypsi
Jun 19th 2012, 02:45 PM
If it doesn't work in the box, I'll just stick it in my truck with the windows up! :smile:

riverbee
Jun 20th 2012, 11:19 AM
gregs post:
"It finally came out right. :grin: Now, when I harvest the next honey, I know what to do with the wax! :smile:"

:thumbsup: and :lol:

gypsi, your 'contraption melter' there should work!:grin:

Slowmodem
Jun 20th 2012, 09:44 PM
I would like to thank everyone for their indulgence suggestions and support! :) :thumbsup:

riverbee
Jun 21st 2012, 01:29 PM
greg,
that's what beek friends are for! :grin:

riverbee
Jul 4th 2012, 12:41 PM
i was shopping in home depot and stumbled across some great material for straining melting wax. i have run out of raggy thread bare t-shirts and have tapped all my friends out!

go to the paint and stain section,(home depot) look for WORKFORCE 10 pk Wiping Cloths. this stuff is white t shirt material and is perfect for straining, (similiar to threadbare). the size of the material, (10 x 15) is perfect to cut in 1/2 and use over a milk carton, so you will have 20 sheets of this to use. about 4 bucks.

also, i said earlier in one of my posts that i do not like to use paper towel because it soaks up too much wax and sometimes runs over the side of the carton.....i discovered in a final melting with bricks that might have some specs in it, if i use 2 layers of cheese cloth with a small 2 or 3" square cut out of the paper towel, placed on top the cheese cloth and directly under the pain the wax is melting this works great to collect the specs.