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View Full Version : Perone Hive-PermApiculture



Isleņo
Jun 15th 2012, 04:53 AM
I have recently become aware of this "new" type of hive/beekeeping method, through an apicultural group similar to this in my native Colombia.
Mr. Perone is an Argentinian beekeeper who is trying to invent a better mousetrap, like most of us beekeepers since time immemorial. All references that I have found through Google, etc. are in Spanish. I'll be happy to translate any of it for anyone interested.
Best regards,
Isleno

Isleņo
Jun 15th 2012, 04:56 AM
As luck would have it, I have just found this link:
http://www.permapicultura.com/English/reserves.aspx
Isleno

kebee
Jun 15th 2012, 06:12 AM
All well and good , but how is one to start a new hive if they have no honey to begain with. If one buys honey from store he is going to add just as bad for honey from any place but here in the USA which has been proven laden with all kinds of bad stuff. Maybe get from local bee clubs if anyone has extra, which would be a mess to get enought.

kebee

Iddee
Jun 15th 2012, 09:00 AM
Kebee, Why not start hives like they did years ago? Start them at the beginning of a flow and let the bees gather their own food.

Although I do believe feeding is acceptable at times, I also believe it is tremendously overdone.

kebee
Jun 15th 2012, 11:17 AM
That would be great also but I sure did not get my bees at begaining of flow, in fact most of it was over with, there is a flow going on here now and the bees are sure working harder than I ever did, just wish I had a 1/10 of their energy or get go.

kebee

jim314
Jun 24th 2012, 09:06 PM
Sorry, but I just don't agree that surgar water for bees is bad. This is only my second year, but my bees would not have made it through last year's summer if it hadn't been for sugar. My two packages arrived the end of April, which was the beginning of a 100 year drought. I also caught a swarm the second week of May. There was nothing for the bees to eat. Kroger and Walmart had people complaining that bees were in the trash cans outside the buildings. I saw them too. They were desperate for whatever they could find to eat, like the left overs of empty soda cans.


My hives built up well on the sugar water and survived the drought. I probably fed too well because all three swarmed early this Spring. I caught one of the swarms and it is now my strongest hive. The sugar water I fed them last year didn't seem to harm them at all.


This Spring has been different, I haven't had to feed any except for a nuc, a package, and a couple of swarms to get them started (3 weeks of feeding I think). So if they need it, feed, if not don't feed. And this year I'm getting honey :)

Isleņo
Jul 3rd 2012, 06:53 PM
I could not agree with you more. During thirty years here in Grenada and previoulsy in Colombia I have fed bees with 65% white or brown sugar syrup, always to excellent results. Wherever I have taught courses of commercial beekeeping, here and in the whole Eastern Caribbean, I always advocate this practice, which is contrary to most Caribbean beekeepers' opinion, by the way. Utter NONSENSE!!
Best regards,
Isleņo




Sorry, but I just don't agree that surgar water for bees is bad. This is only my second year, but my bees would not have made it through last year's summer if it hadn't been for sugar. My two packages arrived the end of April, which was the beginning of a 100 year drought. I also caught a swarm the second week of May. There was nothing for the bees to eat. Kroger and Walmart had people complaining that bees were in the trash cans outside the buildings. I saw them too. They were desperate for whatever they could find to eat, like the left overs of empty soda cans.


My hives built up well on the sugar water and survived the drought. I probably fed too well because all three swarmed early this Spring. I caught one of the swarms and it is now my strongest hive. The sugar water I fed them last year didn't seem to harm them at all.


This Spring has been different, I haven't had to feed any except for a nuc, a package, and a couple of swarms to get them started (3 weeks of feeding I think). So if they need it, feed, if not don't feed. And this year I'm getting honey :)