Trying to find a solution: 7 5/8" deep super


Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Fort Myers, FL, USA
    Posts
    3

    Trying to find a solution: 7 5/8" deep super

    Hello,
    first post to this forum. My wife bought about 300 frames from a retired commecial beekeep for langstroth hive bodies which are 7 1/4" long (that was super cheap $25 with other stuffs including queen rearing stuff wax foundations etc.). With this came 2 super hive bodies which are 7 5/8" deep and hold 10 frames. From my understanding, 3/4 supers with these dimensions were popular in the past when 1 by 8 boards were actually .75" thick and 7 5/8" wide. However, I cannot find them anymore as they are now 7 1/4" wide (we are getting ripped off).

    I have tried to find inexpensive solutions (I do have a wood shop) and the cheapest and most practical seems to get 8' by 4' marine plywood at the local Lowes which retails for about $75. I can then cut 7 hive bodies out of that (actually 7.5 hive bodies) for about $10 a hive body which should last a very long time since it is marine 3/4" thick plywood.

    The other option would be to splice three piece of 1 by 3 furring strip boards (which are often a challenge to get straight) for a final cost of about 4-5 dollars a hive body.

    What do you guys think? and do you know of a supplier who carries 7 5/8" hive bodies (I checked Mann Lake but they no longer carry them).

    Cheers to all.


    News:
    I just called MannLake Ltd and I found out that they do have 7 5/8 hive bodies (in all three grades they carry). Cost is however $13.95 a hive body. gandmhoney also carry some for about the same price. I guess, I will just build mine out of marine plywood then. Hope this info can be useful for some.

    Last edited by hydrocynus; Jan 28th 2017 at 02:26 PM. Reason: New INFO

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,456
    Blog Entries
    6
    I don't know where to find the deeper hive bodies. I guess the problem is those frames won't fit anything less. The marine plywood isn't treated with any pesticides or chemicals is it?

    No, maybe I should do a few more hive inspections before trying to cram 3 hive visits into one trip.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Fort Myers, FL, USA
    Posts
    3
    Marine plywood is not treated wood. The difference is that the ply of woods are glued with epoxy glue that is impervious to water and thus does not delaminate.

    I decided to go with the splicing of 3 furring strip wood boards. One 4" sandwitched between 2 3". Cost per hive body is then about less than 4 bucks.

    I found the source of 7 5/8 hive bodies but the price is about 13-14 bucks plus the shipping which is high. No local bee suppliers sell these.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to hydrocynus For This Useful Post:


  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Spencer, MA
    Posts
    663
    Plywood is heavy, that's why most hives are not made from them. You'll need a strong back or a mechanical mover. I would trash the frames, order new ones and cut the foundation to fit.
    circle7 honey and pollination

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Fort Myers, FL, USA
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by camero7 View Post
    Plywood is heavy, that's why most hives are not made from them. You'll need a strong back or a mechanical mover. I would trash the frames, order new ones and cut the foundation to fit.
    Well, I decided to keep the frames and I built 6 boxes made out of boards I spliced together. Looking good and light with box joints. However, I did buy an 8 by 4 3/4" sheet of marine plywood that was heavily discounted at my shop ($35 a piece!). I will make supers out of them. For mediums, the cost will be about $3.5 a piece and the shop cuts the pieces, so I only need to make the dado box joints (I have a jig for that) and the pockets for the handles (jig for that too). The difference in weight compared to the weight of honey is negligible (and I still am strong/athletic young man, so I might switch to lighter wood later on).

    Probably great wood to make a Kenyan hive too. At that price, I might buy more.

    Thank you all.

    Serge

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,456
    Blog Entries
    6
    I still use 10 frame deep boxes, and I am not a spring chicken, but I am gradually trying to scale down to medium equipment, and I last lifted a full dual box hive in 2012, and that cost me several visits to a massage therapist to straightenin my back out. I have extra boards and I take them apart to move them and set each box aside on my little bee table that wanders around the apiary with me. But I didn't take up bees until I was 52. and then I was a young one at my local bee club. We have since added a lot of younger beekeepers thank goodness
    No, maybe I should do a few more hive inspections before trying to cram 3 hive visits into one trip.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Spencer, MA
    Posts
    663
    I still am strong/athletic young man, so I might switch to lighter wood later on
    I was young and strong once too Glad it's working for you
    circle7 honey and pollination

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,456
    Blog Entries
    6
    I'm going to sit this arm wrestle out

    No, maybe I should do a few more hive inspections before trying to cram 3 hive visits into one trip.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •