Interesting Read About Micro Doses Of Bee Venom


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  1. #1
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    Interesting Read About Micro Doses Of Bee Venom

    T. V. Ruzankina
    Novosibirsk medical academy, Russia
    Micro-doses of bee venom

    (Trans. by Oliver Mihajlović)

    When a bee stings some amounts of formic acid and melitin are injected under the skin, which causes local reaction. This can be avoided if we first make bee sting some rough clean fabric (the sting won’t remain in light soft cloth). During this process which lasts from 5-6 seconds to one minute the first fractions of bee venom are absorbed. Then, the sting is separated with sharp sterile pincers and put on biologically active points. The sting remains on the skin one second or how ever long is necessary. This is what is called a “child” dose (micro-doses) of bee venom. The first biological test lasts one second.
    Micro-doses are excellent; they have a strong healing effect. They expand the possibilities of using bee venom for healing children, elderly patients and those who suffer from allergies. For many years I have treated pollen allergy with child doses of bee venom, which I recommend to be used together with 5% propolis ointment based on oil. Rhinitis symptoms thus disappear in several seconds. Headache is also easily relieved. One bee sting can be used on 10 – 15 biologically active spots. Doses can be altered in time.
    Micro-doses are also efficient with facial nerve neuralgia. I determine the time of exposure individually.
    A boy with the second degree adenoids was being prepared for the surgery operation. His parents decided not to hurry and brought him to me to examine him. He was recommended to apply propolis ointment on his back (for two weeks) and to rub it on his nose 1 – 3 times a day during one month and a half and to take royal jelly in the morning and honey before sleeping. Once in a week he was given a micro-dose of bee venom on his nose (during one month and a half). This did not cause any swelling, redness or pain. The boy felt better and was coming to the treatments with pleasure. Gradually, he began to breathe through his nose days and nights. After the treatment the otolaryngologist did not found any adenoids. Further treatment consisted of one teaspoon of honey and propolis before sleeping for six months.


    I have always preferred to read authors who tell how they do things, rather then those who tell how things should be done... Jay Smith

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  3. #2
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    Very interesting


  4. #3
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    Sorry to sound skeptic, but I generally take such "scientific' articles from Russia with a grain of salt. Lets hear of something done on a larger number of patients and "control" treatments before we reach any recommendable conclusions.

  5. #4

    Cool

    People are using bee venom to cure their arthritis in quite a few countries. I have heard a lot of folks mention how it's enabled them to walk, again due to disabling pain. The elderly benefit from bee venom.

    I don't know how I feel about this-since we are essentially running out of bees this does not seem right but it's common for individuals to buy bees from local beekeepers and hold them to the skin with tweezers and force the bee to sting them. Of course it dies, then.

    Personally I have suffered from arthritis symptoms in the past and I have never been stung by a bee but I am starting to wonder what I'm missing out on.
    Studies say beekeepers live longer than others.

    Articles | Rachel Haygood Natural Care

  6. #5
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    Fear not Rachel---once you start with the bees, you are guaranteed to experience stings. Brace yourself for that first one, Believe it or not, after you''ve had enough (that's a relative number) you'll accept them with equinimity.
    Proud member of the Beekeeping Forums,
    (middle-east division)
    From the land flowing with milk and HONEY

  7. #6
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    Yep, you kinda get used to them. I got 6 or 8 in the face today. Couldn't even remember where each one was to count them after donning the veil.

    Yeah, guys, I actually put it on today.

  8. #7
    Um...Iddee, that sounds terrible. Have you ever been stung in the eye? I have often wondered what that would be like...

    Efmesch-I have been bitten by a wasp, once and I recall it hurting but never stung
    Studies say beekeepers live longer than others.

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  9. #8
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    Rachel, I assume you mean stung by a wasp. I don't think their bites would be anything to be concerned about. In any event. then you've been prepared, wasp and bee stings are pretty similar in their effects on the victim.
    Proud member of the Beekeeping Forums,
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  10. #9
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    On the closed eye lid, yes. I have never known anyone to be stung in the eye itself. I think our reflexes are too quick to let that happen.

    No, that isn't terrible. Less than 10, I consider a good day. 10 to 50, a rough day.

    50 to 200, a dumb beek day.

  11. #10
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    This discussion on stings brings back a recollection of my childhood----I was in the school yard during recess from classes (2nd or third grade) and a wasp flew into my shirt and stung me four times on the chest. Crying, I ran home (four blocks away) to receive consolation/ help from my mother. But no one was home so I reluctantly returned to school...When I reappeared there I was given a thorough scolding for having left school in the middle of the day without permission. My explanation as to why I had left was unimportant. I don't recall what I was given as a punishment, but whatever it was, it made me forget about the pain of the stings--but not the event of about 65 years ago
    Proud member of the Beekeeping Forums,
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  12. #11
    When I checked for a stinger there was none. I was told that wasps will also bite! It caused a considerable amount of pain and swelling, however. I put clay on it and it seemed to help. Not really sure what happened, there.
    Studies say beekeepers live longer than others.

    Articles | Rachel Haygood Natural Care

  13. #12
    Iddee, that is good to know that about the eye. It makes sense. Those are a LOT of bee stings!
    Studies say beekeepers live longer than others.

    Articles | Rachel Haygood Natural Care

  14. #13
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    After 35 years in the bees, you don't feel half the stings, and the other half are just annoyances.

    PS. Wasps don't leave the stinger. Only honeybees do. Wasps can sting multiple times.

  15. #14
    Well. Now I know. I got a funny picture in my head every time I heard people say wasps bite. It does not really make sense

    Glad you don't feel them, anymore! I tolerate certain kinds of pain well so this might be one of those kinds.

    Studies say beekeepers live longer than others.

    Articles | Rachel Haygood Natural Care

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