"Africanize"bees genetically diluted

Discussion in 'Beekeeping Biology' started by Versipelis, Mar 31, 2015.

  1. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The theory is This: that a small introduction of Africanized genes might be a good thing for long term sustainability.The logic being that Africanize bee show a strong resistance to varroa mites, thus, a small dose of these genes might be a positive thing. When the Africanize escaped in Brazil in the 50's, What were they trying to do? Create a better bee with Africanize genes?

    Any comments/ideas?
     
  2. camero7

    camero7 Member

    Messages:
    692
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Scuts were introduced to the US by the USDA years ago for just that reason. Most states have some scut lineage from that and the many migratory beekeepers who transport bees through all the 48 states.
     

  3. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Interesting, I wasn't aware that the USDA was involved. I do know that Varroa Mites are still a problem. In your opinion, was there program marginally successful? I'll have to do a little research now.

    Thanks
     
  4. camero7

    camero7 Member

    Messages:
    692
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Well, it was years ago and the genetic material is so diluted it is hard to find now. The more recent migration from South America has had a much greater impact. Every state in the lower 48 has some AHB in their genetic pool.
     
  5. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  6. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    What grabs my attention on the previous picture post is the scuts performance against varroa rated at a 10 out of 10, in my mind, that must mean they're totally immune. I couldn't find much on the USDA web site. Do you know of a link where I could research their introduction of scuts genes into the general gene pool?
     
  7. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

    Messages:
    313
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    I was not aware that USDA was involved, either. The documentary "More Than Honey" depicts efforts in Australia.
     
  8. jredburn

    jredburn New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Back in the late 40s and 50s the USDA imported queens from all over the world, including queens from Africa and kept them on a place called Merrit Island. It being less than a mile from the mainland, the bees the bees swarmed and flew across to the gap to set up new residences. The Africans were not the mean ones we have today but were quite easy to live with.
    It was never published but in the late 60s the UC at Davis inherited 200 bees hives, when they checked into the linage they found they were 100% Africans. They to were mild tempered. Nobody knows what happened to them.
     
  9. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That's interesting. I searched Google for the words Merrit island and bee but I couldn't find anything. How did you come by this story?
     
  10. becsbeehive

    becsbeehive New Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thanks for that video, ibeelearning!