Reusing a Hive

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Steve777, Apr 12, 2017.

  1. Steve777

    Steve777 New Member

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    My hive died last winter (actually late last fall I suspect). I didn't want to open it during the winter and add to the stress in case it was still going, so I inspected it this spring. What I found was considerable amounts of stores (pollen and honey, say 30# of honey) and very few if any bees, couple dozen dead bees mostly on the bottom board). There was very little brood if any to speak of, and the little there was scattered in pockets.

    Overall, I would not be too concerned about reusing this equipment after cleaning it up, except for one thing I found. In the couple of patches of sealed brood (no more than 4-5 sq in total) a few of the cells have holes in them. I've opened one or two and do not see the gummy remains of a larvae, and in a couple there seem to be fully formed bees which were trying or about to come out. But still this could be a sign of AFB.

    What do folks think?
     
  2. beebuzzed

    beebuzzed Member

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    There are places you can send brood samples for free testing to make sure.
    I would suggest doing so before reusing if suspicious.
     

  3. beebuzzed

    beebuzzed Member

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    headline bar
    Submission of Samples for Diagnosis:

    General Instructions
    ••Beekeepers, bee businesses, and regulatory officials may submit samples.
    ••Samples are accepted from the United States and its territories; samples are NOT accepted from other countries.
    ••Include a short description of the problem along with your name, address, phone number or e-mail address.
    ••There is no charge for this service.
    ••For additional information, contact Sam Abban by phone at (301) 504-8821 or e-mail: samuel.abban@ars.usda.gov
    How to Send Adult Honey Bees
    •• Send at least 100 bees and if possible, select bees that are dying or that died recently. Decayed bees are not satisfactory for examination.
    •• Bees should be placed in and soaked with 70% ethyl, methyl, or isopropyl alcohol as soon as possible after collection and packed in leak-proof containers.
    •• USPS, UPS, and FedEx do no accept shipments containing alcohol. Just prior to mailing samples, pour off all excess alcohol to meet shipping requirements.
    •• Do NOT send bees dry (without alcohol).
    How to send brood samples
    ••A comb sample should be at least 2 x 2 inches and contain as much of the dead or discolored brood as possible. NO HONEY SHOULD BE PRESENT IN THE SAMPLE.
    ••The comb can be sent in a paper bag or loosely wrapped in a paper towel, newspaper, etc. and sent in a heavy cardboard box. AVOID wrappings such as plastic, aluminum foil, waxed paper, tin, glass, etc. because they promote decomposition and the growth of mold.
    ••If a comb cannot be sent, the probe used to examine a diseased larva in the cell may contain enough material for tests. The probe can be wrapped in paper and sent to the laboratory in an envelope.
    Send samples to:
    Bee Disease Diagnosis
    Bee Research Laboratory
    10300 Baltimore Ave. BARC-East
    Bldg. 306 Room 316
    Beltsville Agricultural Research Center - East
    Beltsville, MD 20705

    Last Modified: 8/12/2016
     
  4. beebuzzed

    beebuzzed Member

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  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    fully formed bees trying to hatch probably do not indicated AFB. Ropy larval material (like snot) if you stick a toothpick in the hole is an indicator for AFB. You can submit a sample anyway if you would feel better about it, especially if AFB is occurring in your area