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Has anybody had any experience with 12 frame boxes? I understand that bees are more productive when the boxes are stacked so that the frames are perpendicular to each other.... that is.... turning each stacked box 90 degrees from the one below.
 

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Has anybody had any experience with 12 frame boxes? I understand that bees are more productive when the boxes are stacked so that the frames are perpendicular to each other.... that is.... turning each stacked box 90 degrees from the one below.
I have heard of folks experimenting with larger than 10 frames, but have never heard about production being different if boxes were turned 90 degrees to one another.
In fact, I would think that it would seem to me to be the opposite. :???: :confused:
How would turning the boxes affect the laying pattern of a queen?
I would also think you may end up with some ugly bridge/burr comb.
 

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I would think the frames perpendicular to each other would hinder ventilation of the hive.
 

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I think the British std hive ( National Hive ) being square will take 12 frames.

It is essentially 14x14 inches , they also make a 14x12" hive.
 

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we use to have a similar size here in the US that were called jumbos.

I know of a man who knows a man who knows where there is a rather large metal building full of those monsters.

had some experience with a few of those a long time ago. you didn't just toss those around or wish to move them much. they were matched with similar sized queen excluder and everything above was the beekeepers.
 

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I think the British std hive ( National Hive ) being square will take 12 frames..
If I recall correctly, this was the solution of the English to the possible problem of not having enough room in the brood nest for a really productive queen. 12 frames were calculated to allow uncrowded room for laying a full cycle of eggs without the queen being cramped for space before emerging brood made room for her next pass at the same frame. It had nothing to do with improving the honey production of the hive. Honey storage was still managed by adding on additional supers, alligned the same direction as in the box below.
Whoever gets full 12-frame supers filled with honey better be prepared to buy a good back brace.:doh:
 
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