1813?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Ray, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Going stir crazy waiting for Good bee weather. That got me thinking about those less fortunate (weather-wise), our Canadian Brothers?,Cousins?, Neighbors?. That reminded me that, 200 years ago if they had been a little less loyal or a little more acceptable to liberation: they would be US and could speak proper English:lol:

    Apologies to anyone offended! Just me, Clowning around!
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    But would their winters be any shorter or less severe?
     

  3. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nah, if we were after speaking proper english y'all 'ould be wondering what we was a sayin' to ya.:lol: Actually the fellow bringing our surname to Canada came up from Massachusetts. Got land as a loyalist. Interesting to look back and think how differently things might have played out all but for chance.

    Makes you wonder about the saying " There is a divinity that shapes our ends, rough hew them as we will."
     
  4. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    A lot of Michiganders/ Michiganians have Canadian heritage ( a lot of them don't know it). I have a loyalist ancestors also, from Pennsylvania. Cheaper land chased them out of Canada and into the USA.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2013
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    a Ray snip....
    they would be US and could speak proper English[​IMG]

    tecumseh...
    and no French.... o' la la!
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I always wondered why they marched funny up there, then when i got older i figured it out. There marching pants were froze and that would make me talk funny too.:lol: Jack
     
  7. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Isn't there still the french district In Louisiana? If not in the US exchange the french language for Spanish. On my side of the country speaking an Asian language like Mandarin would be more helpful than knowing French.
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Louisiana ( cajuns) are known to have roots up here. The "Acadians" who were expulsed by the English went south to become "cajuns".
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Back in the 50's when i was stationed in Little Falls, Minn. (army camp Ripley) they made fun of the way i talked, they would laugh and ask why i talked so slow, and to spit it out.I would tell them i was trying to figure out what the hell they were saying before i answered them. They talked so fast their sentences sound like one word,well a couple of them went to far with there name calling the first 2 weeks i was there, and we had a attitude adjustment, and after that they thought i talked just fine and we became good friends.:thumbsup: I didn't want to hurt there feelings and didn't say anything,but i still can't stand that Polka music.:roll: Jack
     
  10. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    :eek:How can anybody not like Polka music?

    So play me some beer drinkin music
    And let me hear that 1 and 2 and 3:thumbsup:
     
  11. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Sorry, but I'm NOT going to put a "U" in color or neighbor! :rolling:
     
  12. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

    Messages:
    3,276
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    :shock: 1 and 2 and 3, you have a mean streak Ray.:lol: Jack
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    well the french they speak in southern louisiana is of various dialect (mixed up with a wide variety of other languages of various ethnic origins) and although all sound a bit french I would think a frenchman might have some trouble following along. the locals call themselves coon asses which at one time was kind of consider to be something of a slur but now all the cajun that I know from southern louisiana are quite proud to call themselves by that name.

    If I recall my history lesson properly the historical Tecumseh and the Shawnee Indians of the Ohio Valley were allied with the Canadian in opposition to the recently formed US in the little war that Ray alludes to. I can not recall the date exactly but Tecumseh himself died at the front side of that little conflict up somewhere near Ray's local.... the battle of Big Timbers or something like that.
     
  14. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

    Messages:
    2,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Yes We know how it is, we have the newfoundlanders on the east coast and although they sound real pretty when they talk one cant understand a dam thing they are saying. thanks for the history lessons.
     
  15. Ray

    Ray Member

    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Wikipedia:Tecumseh (pron.: /tɛˈkʌmsə/; March 1768 – October 5, 1813) was a Native American leader of the Shawnee and a large tribal confederacy (known as Tecumseh's Confederacy) which opposed the United States during Tecumseh's War and the War of 1812. Tecumseh has become an iconic folk hero in American, Aboriginal and Canadian history.[SUP][1][/SUP]Tecumseh grew up in the Ohio Country during the American Revolutionary War and the Northwest Indian War, where he was constantly exposed to warfare.[SUP][2][/SUP] With Americans continuing to encroach on Indian territory after the British ceded the Ohio Valley to the new United States in 1783, the Shawnee moved farther northwest. In 1808, they settled Prophetstown in present-day Indiana. With a vision of establishing an independent American Indian nation east of the Mississippi under British protection, Tecumseh worked to recruit additional tribes to the confederacy from the southern United States.[SUP][2][/SUP]
    During the War of 1812, Tecumseh's confederacy allied with the British in The Canadas (the collective name for the colonies of Upper Canada and Lower Canada), and helped in the capture of Fort Detroit. American forces killed Tecumseh in the Battle of the Thames, in October 1813. His confederation fell apart, the British deserted their Indian allies at the peace conference that ended the War of 1812, the dream of an independent Indian state in the Midwest vanished, and American settlers took possession of all the territory south of the Great Lakes, driving the Indians west or into reservations.

    history lesson for today, quiz on Friday:lol:
     
  16. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Funny enough, I still consider our tecumseh an iconic folk hero!
     
  17. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thanks for that Ray. nice catch.
     
  18. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Bit-o-history:
    Tecumseh is big in our Indiana history books. Quote from Ray, " they settled Prophetstown in present-day Indiana."

    Prophetstown is about 8 miles north of Brett (Crazy8) and myself in Lafayette, IN. It is one of Indiana's newest state parks.