1st frame of Honey.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Jun 20, 2012.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ok, It wasn't all capped yet but could not resist. Sure is good. Very light.

    2012-06-19_20-44-27_257.jpg

    Saw something while inspecting hives though.
    One of the cutouts we did was very sluggish for a while when we first got it home, I started feeding them and now they have come to life. While looking at them tonight we found about 6 capped queen cells and this hive seemd to be a little pissy. Very persistent hitting us in the head etc. The frames had a very good coverage of capped brood, looked really good. The Queen cells were not at the bottom of frames, they were in the middle of the frames, 2 together on one side , then 2 together on another side. They have plenty of room. 90% of the deep filled out and they have comb drawn on about 60% of the medium but nothing capped on it yet.

    Wonder whats up with the attitude and the 6 queen cells.
     
  2. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If you are feeding them or were feeding them with that honey super on then that is most likely capped "whatever you fed them".

    If that went on after you were done feeding.....NICE!

    Queen cells could be that they swarmed or are superceding. If there was capped brood but no eggs or open brood that gives you a timeframe of the last time a queen was there or laying eggs. I know I had the same thing this year. Lost a swarm and didn't know it until I inspected :(
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    a snip..
    While looking at them tonight we found about 6 capped queen cells and this hive seemd to be a little pissy.

    tecumseh:
    disposition suggest the old queen is now gone. you can via feeding excessively encourage a hive to superscede the queen.... that is excess feeding means the bees fill every possible cell with syrup and thereby allow no place for the queen to lay. as us Methodist might say... everything in moderation.

    your first honey (don't worry so much at this time if it is syrup of flower based) sure does taste good.... huh?
     
  4. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A moment to remember. Feels good too. :)
     
  5. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Rule of thumb says that if 2/3 of the frame is capped, you can go ahead and extract. But it usually pays to give the frame a good shake over the hive to see if any nectar spills out. If none does, than you're in business.
    Like Tec says, "don't worry so much at this time if it is syrup of flower based"--so long as you have noo plans to sell any. For marketing, you've got to be sure you're selling 100% nectar honey, not syrup "honey". ENJOY!
     
  6. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Swarm cells = bottom; supercedure = top... I had some queen cells last week "in the middle" in last year's somewhat weak hive and made the field decision to remove them... and have second guessed myself every since. Hopefully the ladies will have mercy on a new beek and communicate more clearly next time.

    My gude wyfe's first honey from the backyard sealed the deal in turning "your bees" into "our bees." Of course, it is a curse as well: you wil never, ever be able to buy processed honey off the grocery store shelf again, or easily use whatever product is in the "honey" bottle at the IHop.
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Swarm cells hanging from edge of comb

    Emergency and supercedure cells in the comb itself.

    Change your dictionary and delete the section on removing queen cells, except for making more hives.
     
  8. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    These were a cutout and were moving very slowly. Then I started feeding them a wow have they expoded. Deep frames packed with capped brood and tons on bees. The medium super is almost drawen out and has a lot of syrup/nectar in the comb. Gonna add another medium this Sat. and stop feeding. Seems like th queen has to be healthy with all the capped brood.

    Now I may need to be looking for a swarm, huh?

    They were in the the middle of the frames BUT, they seemd to be built on the bottoms of some sections of frame the were cut out and rubberbanded in the frames. So they are kinda on the bottom of comb but located in the middle of the frame. If that makes sense.

    May check on them aging this afternoon and take a picture.
     
  9. JUDELT

    JUDELT New Member

    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    what method did you use to harvest the honey? I'm going to get my 1st honey this weekend and need the easiest way without an extractor!
     
  10. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    yankee11,
    your post, "Now I may need to be looking for a swarm, huh?
    They were in the the middle of the frames BUT, they seemd to be built on the bottoms of some sections of frame the were cut out and rubberbanded in the frames. So they are kinda on the bottom of comb but located in the middle of the frame"

    iddees post:
    "Swarm cells hanging from edge of comb
    Emergency and supercedure cells in the comb itself.
    Change your dictionary and delete the section on removing queen cells, except for making more hives."

    i don't remove any cells anytime as iddee suggests, this is removing potential queens that your colony may need and the bees have a reason and purpose for these cells. also, a link to queen cell identification here and helpful management suggestions here:

    queen cell identification
     
  11. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAFCiSXGg2I

    basic, simple, fast, easy. I watched this and that's how I did my first frame (for the most part)
     
  12. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

    Messages:
    625
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    No, I didn't remove the queen cells. I left them as is.

    I did get our last cutout that we had living in a Nuke box moved to a 10 frame deep. So, I took the nuke box that had comb built in it and put it up in the only tree in front of the 5 hives. I put it about 7 foot up in the tree. If they swarm, I feel pretty
    sure they will go up in this tree and hopefully find this box that has hed bees living in it for a coupe of weeks.

    We shall see.

    Question about how we harvested that frame. Crushed it and ran it through a metal filter then through a paint filter.

    2012-06-19_21-07-58_108.jpg
     
  13. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    (snickering) Now you're going to have to figure out what to do with the wax! :think:
     
  14. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Yankee11: "I feel pretty sure they will go up in this tree and hopefully find this box that has hed bees living in it for a coupe of weeks."

    efmesch: You could put some "swarm bait" in the hive to increase your chances---a tuft of cotton with some lemon grass oil on it.
     
  15. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    a snip...
    queen cell identification

    tecumseh
    should be a must read for any new beekeeper and doesn't hurt us old guys to review such stuff from time to time either.​
     
  16. JUDELT

    JUDELT New Member

    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    wow, that video is the easiest method i have seen so far!
     
  17. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  18. kebee

    kebee Active Member

    Messages:
    1,008
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I was planning on harvest some honey this weekend but got email that the equipment I order was on backorder and it would be next week befored I would get it, I know now to order stuff in advance to be sure I have it when needed.

    kebee
     
  19. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

    Messages:
    1,936
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ain't THAT the truth!
     
  20. ibeelearning

    ibeelearning Member

    Messages:
    316
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    18
    LOL... I need to adopt the George Costanza "Do the opposite" stratagy when I am working with bees! Thanks, again, Iddee.