2 mites in the sugar test only. What next?

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by BonnieBee, Sep 2, 2017.

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  1. BonnieBee

    BonnieBee New Member

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    New bee keepers here in Minnesota - our first year. We started with a package of bees in May and lost the queen almost immediately. We requeened with a genetically bred Varroa Resistant Italian Queen. She's been a beauty and has almost filled 2 deeps with brood - more brood than honey. We recently added a 3rd deep for honey and are starting 2:1 sugar water syrup feed. We did a powdered sugar mite test today and found only 2 mites in a cup of bees, which we shook 2 minutes and waited 2 more minutes before shaking out. Then we uncapped 10 drone brood and found only 1 mite. From what I read online, these are low counts, and treatment is hard on the bees, and queens die, so I'm wondering what to do next? We plan to use the Mite Away Quick Strips, as I believe this is an allowed organic treatment. Wait a month and retest? Treat anyway, no matter what? Do nothing? Use a different treatment? Any advice appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    Wait a month and retest. I would consider not treating at all if your numbers don't go up, but as they go broodless I probably would use oxalic acid to start at as close to zero mites as possible.
     

  3. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    I use OA vapor, found that treatment has almost no negative effect on the bees..just dont breath any in during treatment of the bees...lol..do you use vapor or drip?
     
  4. Gypsi2

    Gypsi2 New Member

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    I use OA vapor and will be buying a "gas mask" as my changed application system will leave me a bit more vulnerable to breathing fumes. OAV is most effective when the hive is broodless. Down here, now is as close as we get, but in the north I expect you are building up population for winter.
     
  5. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    So far i have been using the dribble method. A 1/2 gallon poly sprayer I have experimented with and i can accurately complete the application in about 30 seconds. Of course you have to open the hive to get down to the top of the brood.
     
  6. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    might have to look into that. I've got a shoulder injury that makes battery toting require wheels. What is the recommended temperature to apply the dribble. It's pretty hot down here. (90's)
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2017
  7. ccjersey

    ccjersey Member

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    There are lots of Youtube videos. I think Brushy mountain has one but there are others. I didn't pick up on a recommendation as far as temperature goes.
     
  8. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    you can get much smaller rechargeable batteries for the OA vapor... do you know the size of a fios battery from verizon? its just a few pounds....and under $20.00 bucks
     
  9. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I read something on the dribble today, it's once a year or kills the queen, brood and most of the bees eventually.

    I am going to stick with OAV. Right now I just put sticky boards in to check mite count. One hive had no brood til I added the nuc on top, which has 3 frames capped. Once they hatch out I'll use OAV. I use a little lawnmower battery, and have a dolly I can strap it to, park it to recharge, disconnect and tote it to the bee yard.
     
  10. roadkillbobb

    roadkillbobb Member

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    my best investment was one of those garden carts with the big tires for going over rough ground, I can load it with some weight and it is very easy to pull around...I can put all my bee stuff in it and then go service the hive..what also works great are those battery jump boxes for jumping a dead battery in your car..I always have one fully charged, I have been using that for OA treatments , it isnt that heavy and has a carry handle, and a power shut off switch for controlling the jumper cable part..