2# or 3#

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by coffee, Jan 24, 2010.

  1. coffee

    coffee New Member

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    what do you get 2 pound or 3 pound , package ?? :dash1:
    Is there a big advantage to the 3 pound package ??? :doh:
    When calling for an idea of what the package's are going for some
    are just doing 2pound ..is the pound more worth the 10 to
    15 dollars?? :frustrated:
     
  2. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    3 pound....and yes, it is worth it.
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Florida in March, 2 lb. may work. In MN., likely Apr. or May, definitely 3 lb.
     
  4. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    The more bees the more work that will get done. If you are starting off on foundation or foundationless they can pull more comb in a shorter period of time and the queen can get underway of laying more eggs sooner. Now that the queen has laid eggs the house bees will need to cover the brood to keep it warm, this leaves more girls to go out foraging for nector and pollen. While it will take 21 days for the new bees to hatch some of the package bees will be dieing off as well.

    G3
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    iddee writes:
    Florida in March, 2 lb. may work. In MN., likely Apr. or May, definitely 3 lb.

    tecumseh:
    don't absolutely know (don't really have that much experience in those kinds of thing) but the way it was explained to me 30 years ago was just the opposite from what iddee suggest. the difference being the possibility of extreme temperature swings (cold) . I think the idea was at northern locations a 3# package could brood up beyond it's capacity to cover the brood and be severely set back or killed by extreme cold jolts after they were established but prior to the initial brood hatching. the duration and timing of the flow(s) would also be a consideration.

    if it was me and I chose the package route I would obtain a 3# package and consider the extra one pound of bees good insurance. no matter what the size of the initial package (2#, 3# or 4#) I would feed till the unit got to be 1 good box of bees. no matter what the cost of sugar the initial splash of feed is cheap relative to the cost of the package and the sugar gives a group of bees a bit more energy (heat) to maintain themselves.
     
  6. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    tec, when you use to make packaged bees or mail (don't remember which you said) the Midnight bees for Sears & Roebuck. Which was the biggest seller #2 or #3 lb packages. Seems like they only had #3lb. i don't remember where they were shipped from, but were good bees to work with until they superseded (ouch), had some queens that lasted 5 years before running out.We don't see queens like that anymore, :confused: oh, the good old days.Jack (sorry got a little off topic)
     
  7. coffee

    coffee New Member

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    they will be put in a 125 pound and 150 pound deadout hive's
    so feeding is not a problem .. and it will be all drawn frames ,so
    all the girls have to do is cover the brood .

    brooksbeefarm
    don't worry about it you had the word , bee ,, in your post ,, so you are still on
    the topic
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    brooksbeefarm writes:
    Which was the biggest seller #2 or #3 lb packages. Seems like they only had #3lb. i don't remember where they were shipped from, but were good bees to work with until they superseded (ouch), had some queens that lasted 5 years before running out.We don't see queens like that anymore

    tecumseh:
    that would have been the mid 1980's when my employer had the contract. I think??? not long after Sears halted a lot of the specialty catalogues (you bought the bees and equipment via a Farm Catalogue). I think earlier the contract was held by Morris Weaver (perhaps I will check on that detail in a day or so??) All the package that went to Sears were 3#. The queens varied by source, but I think by and large most came from one or the other of the Weavers (there was three Weavers in those days). Just casually review the literature of the era evidently a lot of the hybrid producers (I think most all were actually 3 way crosses) had problems maintaining drone population. There is also a lot of evidence in the old bee magazine of the same approximate era than nosema a. was a problem for any number of the major queen producers. the results of at least one 'blind test' that I recall was extremely startling... superscedure rates of from 0 to 100% .

    just my impression (from a comparison of stock fed and treated equally) the midnights were the worst kind of choice for any southern beekeeper wanting to produce bees in number. the midnight did work out well for some of the migratory folks... you just couldn't shake any bees off of them.
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    tec, thanks for the info. The bees i ordered from Sear's & Roebuck was about 1965, so this was before your time. They were larger(the midnight bees) than the bees we have today, they were gentle and hard workers until they superseded. I only had a army surplus mosquitoe net,straw hat, overalls,flannel shirt and brown jersey gloves, and a smoker to work bees with. They mated with those little black bees along the Big Sac river (mean), to make a long story short, my wife would stand behind the screendoor and rake them off me with a broom before she would let me in the house. :mrgreen: Jack
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    I too had some of those mean little black bees, would just come looking for you. Had several hives I was glad finally died out, too mean to even re-queen.

    G3
     
  11. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    likely german black bees (apis milifera milifera sp. ain't quite right??) ... they were smaller than the italians. my original mentor kept those and they were nasty little buggers. vengeful ladies and I swear they could smell you coming.
     
  12. m.s.

    m.s. New Member

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    three pound or better
     
  13. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    if you are new to this stuff (which I would guess by your questions your are) that would be the way I would advise you to go.