Beekeeping Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Generally you can hear whatever information you want to hear whether pro or con by simply asking a different beekeeper, I am trying them from R. Weaver, heard nothing but good things about them--my only concerns are the abundance of AHB in Texas and how dense the drone populations are for remaining buckfast. Like any good used car salesman--the buckfast is advertized to be the greatest thing since sliced bread--we will see. getting 4 packages this year just to find out--are pricey but one tends to get what one pays for is that not the saying lol :beg: Wish me luck or make me skilled which ever is appliciable :hi:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
my Buckfast hive from R weaver is doing great, I already have 2 daughters from the queen, they are very aggressive with the SHBs and they are very easy to handle :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Excellant, if thats what to expect then all will be well, my only concerns as stated before is if open mated queens, while I understand drone saturation, I also know AHB are faster, more endurant, and attend the same drone congregation areas as european drone. would not want to have 1/4 AHB introduced into a area that has a building AHB population, unless one wants to have to be re-queen every other year ( should anyway so suspose that don't really matter) I am excited about the potential :thumbsup:
Thanks
Barry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
in regards to Ahb I suspect if your situation is anything similar to the story here ten years down the road you will wonder what all the huff was really about.

I have done testing here (I am on the edge of all the Weavers) and have found some intermingling of african and european genetics.... but not much. i suspect some of this is location, some of it is time of year of producing queens and some the fact that folks like the weavers and myself stimulate the bees early in the season so the drones produced in managed hive greatly exceed anything out there living in some tree. as you move west from here to the more arid brush country the problems of maintaining hives without serious african intermingling increase quite dramatically. there are simply some places where the africans thrive and some where they do not. as far as i can know all the weavers are good enough bee keepers that they are not going to allow some rank bad natured bee in one of their yards for very long.... as much as anything else good location are just too difficult to find to allow this kind of bee to exist in your yard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
Now on the other hand, the all American queen I bought from weaver is a big disappointment, hives way too hot, bees still follow me 100 feet from the hive and even with smoke its like a war zone with the hive open, I split off 2 cells from T1c and took 3 frames from the american hive on Saturday and as soon as the new queen is laying the american queen is toast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,487 Posts
although what you get from anyone is a bit random I do think Zookeeper has the proper attitude here. do set some standard and when the standard is not met use the hive for whatever resources are there, kill the queen and move on.

one of larger and often unstated benefits of rearing some queens of your own is it does allow you to be a bit more critical in the culling process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,126 Posts
I have great success with Buckfast and Belgian Buckfast. We have over 20 in the teaching apiary at USF. We get queens from Miksa in Groveland if the out-of-state ladies don't work for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
barry42001 said:
heard nothing but good things about them--
Same here but no one in our local club have any. I'm tempted to bite the bullet and order a package. Good luck with your venture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
what bullet biting? in the spring just split off a nuc and order a queen, simple and cheap, or do what I did and wait for a cut-out or trap-out and get a queen for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
Zookeep said:
what bullet biting? quote]

I guess bullet biting is a relative term, zookeep. The bullets I bite and experience level I have are different than yours. YMMV and no doubt does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
379 Posts
Buckfasts were my first bees in 2002. They could be feisty, but I had no trouble handling them. They maintained a strong hive and made lots of honey!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
983 Posts
In the new yard started this year brought 10 five frame queenless nucs
Next day introduced buckfast queens from Ferguson apiaries. 100% acceptance.
Going in the winter with nine of them in double deeps and one is three deeps.
Can't wait till spring to have a whole picture. I'll let you know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
983 Posts
As promised back in November, here is report on my Buckfast bees:

Started ten 5 frames nucs last June with Ferguson queens, went into the winter with 9 doubles and 1 triple.
9 out of 10 hives survived, bees looking good, flying, bringing pollen in. Consumed 500 grams pollen patties I gave them last week.
Two days ago placed 1/2 gallon jars with thymolated 1:1 sugar syrup on top of the frames. After second jar they are on their own.
All of my hives I would consider to be gentle bees, but Buckfast is something else, crawling all over my hands, checking me without a single sting, or that angry buzz.
Ferguson Apiaries produce really good buckfast queens, and I'm one very happy customer.:grin:
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top