2012 Honey Prices in Michigan

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by DonMcJr, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Ok so I was thinking of charging $8 a lb by weight of honey.

    My inlaws are seeing it at Farmers Makets and such for $4.99/lb

    It hasn't rained much and I got 58 lbs and am looking at another 58 lbs next month.

    What do you all think about what I should charge?

    I only have 3 hives and only 1 is producing Honey this year...
     
  2. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    I keep seeing posts by folks charging $6 or $7 and they talk about how quickly it sells. My understanding of Economics tells me that selling out quickly means you aren't charging enough. I say go for the $8. You can always cut the price if it is hanging around longer than you like.
     

  3. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    It's all over the place here in SW. Mo., i've seen quarts sell from $11.00 to $18.00. I sell mine for $13.50 per quart (3 lbs. or 48 oz.glass jars) but i've had a good year and don't like to carry it over and have to fool with granulation problems. So my only advise is to charge what the market will bare. Jack
     
  4. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    don,
    don't undersell yourself.....i charge 8.75 for a pound of honey and folks pay it. also, my honey is strained and crystal clear, typically in my area, the farmers market honey is not, and sells for about the same, (4.99). theirs is strained once out of the extractor and bottled, contains wax bits, etc, is cloudy, bubbles and stuff at the top, or it is a nice looking jar and they are underselling themselves, my 2 cents. prices of everything are up, with this drought, i would charge a premium price for my honey. put a nice looking label on it and sell it for 8$.....folks who want beekeepers honey will pay it, and when you have repeat customers, you will be worrying about next years crop to supply those folks who buy from you....
    you worked hard, your bees worked hard. you have 'homegrown' MICHIGAN HONEY! :yahoo:
     
  5. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Thanks everyone...my thoughts exactly...

    $8 a bottle it is...if it doesn't sell then well we will see...
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Even though it's honey you're selling, and that is what is important, remember that a good label never hurt. Surprisingly enough, people tend to rate the honey also (often too much) because of the label, so give it a lot of consideration: colors, layout, wording, etc. LIke Riverbee says, you're selling "homegrown Michigan honey" to your Michigan neighbors. Let them know about that. It means a lot to them.
    Rest assured, it WILL sell! :grin:
     
  7. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Ef is right, as ussual. Good honey label and nice jar are very important. I charge $10 for 500g glass jar of my honey.
    No problem selling. To retailers (three in Toronto) the price is $7 for the same jar.
     
  8. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    The price you sell at is directly related to how many customers you need to find. You can sell a couple of jars at $100 each if you know the right people and market it correctly. You can sell it by the 55 gallon barrel at $1.95 a lb. In the first instance you make a couple hundred dollars. in the second you make $1287. In both cases you work for every penny.

    Somewhere in between those two extremes lies the zone you and your customers fall in.

    58 lbs of honey in 1 lb plastic bottles falls around the 5 to 6 dollar range. in glass bottles with a little bit of attention to visual appeal and you bump it up to 8 dollars a bottle. land a local retailer that wants to fill there store with impressive products and you can go even higher by meeting their need. nicer bottles. attention to different details int eh label etc. I have seen honey at over $25 a bottle in some specialty shops.

    With 100 lbs or so you are in need of making the biggest bank with every oz. So go that extra distance. you worked hard to get the honey in the first place. work as hard selling it and you can improve your profit and justify double the work. The customers are out there you just have to do what it takes to get your product in their hands. Understand what it is they want and provide that.
     
  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Riverbee said: "You worked hard, your bees worked hard."

    Daniel Y said: "You worked hard"

    A big :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

    If you don't place a premium on the hard work you and your bees do, no one else will. :wink: :mrgreen:
     
  10. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    Farmer's Mkt. in Tulsa sold pints for $12.50 and quarts were $20.00. We didn't expect any honey this year so weren't prepared for the 80 lbs. one swarm hive produced so far. We went for the "primitive, this was just poured from the hive into a mason jar" look with hand lettered labels(it was strained). Sold for $10.00 a pint-$18.00 a quart( with or without comb). Gone in a few days and people are wanting more.
     
  11. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Remember too, that just because you chose to work hard and even enjoy your hard work, :think:it doesn't become worth any less. :eek:ldtimer:
     
  12. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    noronajo:
    "Farmer's Mkt. in Tulsa sold pints for $12.50 and quarts were $20.00. We didn't expect any honey this year so weren't prepared for the 80 lbs. one swarm hive produced so far. We went for the "primitive, this was just poured from the hive into a mason jar" look with hand lettered labels(it was strained). Sold for $10.00 a pint-$18.00 a quart( with or without comb). Gone in a few days and people are wanting more"

    good post noronajo, and great comments by all.
    as beekeepers, i think many of us undersell our honey. my thinking is that we can command any price, especially with a great label, and something different, something that stands out above the others, whether it be your jar, label, etc....there will be those who may not pay the price you want, and will scoff, BUT, there are those who will pay the price.

    sometimes i'd like to ask those folks who give me a look for a price, just how much they make an hour.......:lol:

    btw, i would pay the prices i charge for my own honey!
     
  13. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    Always:thumbsup:
    Whenever buying something locally grown/produced I feel privileged and thankful it's available.
     
  14. R Dewhurst

    R Dewhurst New Member

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    $8 a pound is what I just paid from a man in New Castle that I work with.
     
  15. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    $8 a pound is what I'm charging...and I'd gladly pay that for my Honey too only I paid alot more...hives, extractor, hot knife...LMAO!
     
  16. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    marbees post:
    "Whenever buying something locally grown/produced I feel privileged and thankful it's available."

    don's post:
    "$8 a pound is what I'm charging...and I'd gladly pay that for my Honey too only I paid alot more...hives, extractor, hot knife...LMAO!

    :amen:
     
  17. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Why is it that any other commodity in the world It is priced by cost of raw materials Labor add profit and the middle man adds this costs of shipping and storage and that is what we pay for it. With farm produces the selling price is set by the Costco, Walmart, retail stores. and every one else competes with their price.So we have retail price minus store markup, minus wholesale distribution transportation and markup, minus cost for packing and grading including packaging materials. Then what ever is left over is what the farmer gets, and out of that money he has to cover the cost of chemicals, equipment, hired labor etc. and what ever is left, if there is anything left is what the farmer puts in his pocket.
    Keep track of the hours you spend working you bees, bill yourself out at a professional wage, your in the same risk occupation as a fire man having to work with a protective suit and working with a [FONT=&amp]volatile[/FONT] commodity. Cost of Bees and equipment (%of Capital Costs) cost of drugs, feed supplements, packaging. Markup a profit margin and set your price. and don't forget the time involved in selling you product. Never feel guilty charging what it's worth. And don't under sell yourself and what you are worth!!!
     
  18. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    Apis...You've just doubled (or tripled?) the price for honey!
     
  19. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    :thumbsup:
     
  20. Dbure

    Dbure New Member

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    ApisBees is right about people comparing your prices to the Costcos and Walmarts of the world. I believe that the problem lies in consumers being uneducated about what they are actually buying from those places. If they knew what they were getting from there they would never buy it in the first place and would be lined up to buy their honey from a local beekeeper.

    I also think Efmesch is correct in how the lable looks. People have been conditioned to labels. Look at the clothes they buy, the cars they drive, the T.V.s they watch etc. Your hard work and investment can be seen in how you present your product. It shows you are proud enough and think enough of it to ask what you do. When you have a limited amount of that product and people also realize they can't just run to the store and pick up some more of what everyone else can get, they are usually the first ones wanting to be on your list to be contacted when your product is available.