2012 starts off with a varroa mite.......

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by 2kooldad, Jan 1, 2012.

  1. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    its been so hecktic here i havent seen my bees in 2 weeks....so me an the GF walked the hives to see the front door activity....all were active an bringing in pollen from who knows what....got to my biggest hive an noticed a bee carrying another bee...which isnt a big deal but i always look to see why...the bee seemed paralized...wasnt stiff an had its tounge stuck all the way out....then i looked real hard an saw a brown spot up by its neck....varroa....i was sure i knew what it was so i took it over to my truck an poked at it with my Pocket knife an it ran from it....dont know why i didnt expect that but i was like a cat with a mouse then lol...it kinda looks like a little crab...this is the first time ive ever seen one in the flesh....looks like i get to learn varroa combat....was the bee paralized or dead an is that normal ???
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    sounds like good house keeping traits. The bees are removing the dead from the hive.
     

  3. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    so then the bee was dead....it didnt look like a young bee an it wasnt an old tater winged bee either....i got some powdered sugar an a peanut butter jar ready (hows come when you ''want'' kids to eat peanut butter they resist...but when yer short on food money they can eat 6 bucks worth an a sandwhich...with honey O coarse.)
     
  4. jb63

    jb63 New Member

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    Good topic 2kd,I recently watched Don fatbeemans video about fogging with mineral oil.I'm going to give it a try maybe in feb. and march.Don if your out there tell us more about the effectiveness of fogging.I know there is no silver bullet.
     
  5. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    im gonna do a varroa test this weekend hopefully....if not then next week end...things oughta be wound down by then round here....as for what to do if its bad i dont know....i really dont like the idea of chemicals in my hives but then the alternitive is dying hives.....heres a question

    If there arent any varroa in a new bee yard....because there havent been any bees there....how do they get the varroa....do they get it from encounters with other bees while forraging....does the varroa get knocked off another bee on a flower someplace an wait like a tick for another bee to come along....do my bees visit/rob other feral hives an bring them back that way....varroa dont look very areodynamic an i didnt see any wings....can you kill all of the varroa in your hives (is thats possible) an if you did....would they just get them right back....when you do a varroa test with powdered sugar is it the shaking that knocks the mite off the bee...or do they not like powdered sugar....or do the bees go into operation ''clean sweep'' an groom them off....ive heard where people dust their hives with powdered sugar to get the bees into a cleaning mode an let the bees pick them off....does that actually work ????
     
  6. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Do they get it from encounters with other bees? - Yes, most likely from visiting drones I expect.
    Do my bees visit/rob other feral hives and bring them back? - Could be, bees will fly up to 5 kilometers and unless you know exactly what is around beewise in that radius the possibility exists.
    Can you kill all of the Varroa in your hives? - Not likely, there are methods that will come close but there is no magic bullet. Better to concentrate on developing methods that will allow your bees to deal with the Varroa. Even if you managed a 100% kill, it probably wouldn't be long and you would have them again.
    The sugar dusting method works simply by dislodging the mites. With the powder coating the bees, the mite cannot maintain a sufficient
    "grip" and fall. There is also some grooming behaviour involved as well.
     
  7. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    drones huh....what do intruder drones want in my hives....when bees rob they take the honey back to their own hive an deposite it as if it were nector right....since drones dont gather an store nector what do they want when they go into my hive....the queen is already bred sooooo...they just looken for a free meal not of their own hives ??? Hows come my bees dont smack em round a bit an send em packen :|
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Drones don't stay with their hive. They go "bar-hopping" all their life. Anywhere they find a hive, they go in, get fed, and continue on their way. That's nature's way of preventing inbreeding. That's also the way most bee diseases is spread, along with varroa and tracheal mites.
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    there are alternatives beyond chemicals (and even powdered sugar is a chemical).

    decide on one testing method and play with that <you will likely see some significant variability in count no matter what method you choose. when you start seeing capped drones pluck a few and see how that correlates with the method you choose.
     
  10. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    Tracheal mites and varroa, maybe, but not AFB.

    When I was disecting bees for a tracheal mite study, only workers were used. It never occured to me to ask about or think about drones. Seems like they would have had tracheal mites in them too.
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    I was thinking more on the lines of nosema and DWV, but if a hive tool can transfer AFB, why can't a drone?
     
  12. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    true.....he has a good point.....an i would think a honey bee...drone or not....would be even more likely to transmit a bee disease than a hive tool....its a germ sooooo :/ will a drone excluder at the entrance mean less pest/disease ???
     
  13. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A drone excluder at the entrance means a drone excluder at the exit. All drones raised in that hive will die in the hive and rot.
     
  14. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    Ive only seen 2 varroa in my hives so far, been watching real close too, I think most or all hives have them its just a matter if your bees can deal with them or do they get over run by the mites, I dont think a drone excluder will help with anything, the drones would just hang at the entrance as get fed and pass on what ever they are carrying.
     
  15. 2kooldad

    2kooldad New Member

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    ohhhh...i thought a drone excluder let them out an not back in....kinda like a trap out but just the drones...well...i shoulda known if it had been done everybody on here would already have them....what about florida screens....if they keep out robber bees would they also keep out drones from other hives ???