25 queen cells!

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Noronajo, Aug 24, 2012.

  1. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    2012-08-24 18.10.22.jpg
    I think it's been about 10 days since I discovered one of the 3 hives we keep 14 miles from our house was queenless-no eggs, no brood, pretty sure she was gone but couldn't be absolutely sure. I got 2 frames of solid eggs and a few already hatched larvae from my super hive and put in there and waited to see if they would raise a queen. Today I checked and on one side there was 15 queen cells and 10 on the other-all along the bottom. Did they overdo it? I've read about the positioning and according to most they would be swarm cells but it's pretty late in the year and I know that the location of the cells isn't a sure determination. Any thoughts? I'm at a loss- I wanted them to raise "a" queen-are they just making sure they get a good one? Just when I think I've got a handle on this, they do something totally unexpected. Is this just another "wait and see what happens" situation?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    All is well. Relax and let them do their thing.
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    When placing a frame with eggs into a queenless hive, the location they try to draw queen cells out is almost predetermined (to a degree). If all the eggs of the appropriate age just happen to be along the bottom of the frame.......(see where I'm going with this?).
    You were right when you said that cell positions are a good indicator of a colonies intent but when it comes to bees, nothing is written in stone. Iddee is right, this hive is just raising a themselves a new queen, they will be alright.
     
  4. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    They are not preparing to swarm. They simply picked the best queen making eggs to make themselves a new queen- regardless of where they were located. As Idee says, just leave them alone now, and don't move the frames or bump them for the next 10 days or so.
     
  5. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    I really appreciate you alls input. I'm more than a little uneasy when it comes to swarming because one of my 2 beginning hives swarmed 6-7( lost count)times-I did get 4 new hives out of it so it was a good thing. And PerryBee, i never thought about the choice of location being predetermined but this queen where I took the eggs from lays in the entire frame-it's a work of art. She starts in the center and lays to the very last row of cells on the bottom so those eggs are the youngest. So, Iddee, I'm relaxed now and Omie , even tho I want to get in there and see what's going on in a few days, I won't. Thanks for the great advice-it's reassuring to have the resources available here .
     
  6. Daniel Y

    Daniel Y New Member

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    I did pretty much the same thing for different reasons. Mine is a trap out. These bees made 19 queen cells. we split them up for now to double or chances of having a mated healthy queen come out of it all btu will combine them back together for a stronger hive through winter later. For a short period of time we will have as many as three queens producing brood for what will become a single hive.
     
  7. Noronajo

    Noronajo New Member

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    If it was a couple months earlier I'd be making splits 'cause those will be some excellent queens if they take after mom! She was a newly hatched queen this spring from a secondary swarm and at one inspection had 17 out of 20 frames filled with brood and I pulled 2 honey supers off and they're working on 3 and 4.