3 lb package split between two queens?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Pilotbeekeeper, May 6, 2013.

  1. Pilotbeekeeper

    Pilotbeekeeper New Member

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    I'm thinking of splitting a 3 lb package between two 5 frame Nucs. One Nuc gets the package queen, the other a newly mated queen. What do you think? Should i leave the cork on the queen cage of the Nuc that receives the new queen an extra couple days?

    I would appreciate your feedback.

    Thanks
    PBK
     
  2. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    I have heard of people trying this but havent heard of much success. IMHO You would be better off to feed the package and get them up and going strong then split them off.
     

  3. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I'm a second year keep, so take my thoughts with that in mind.
    What you are suggesting might work in NC, but 1.5 lbs of bees isn't that much and I'd imagine they would be slow to get going.

    I'd leave them together until they had pulled comb in two deeps and then split them at that point.
     
  4. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    pbk
    riverrat suggested:
    "I have heard of people trying this but havent heard of much success. IMHO You would be better off to feed the package and get them up and going strong then split them off"

    in my own HO, i would agree with riverrat, get them built up, then divide.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Years ago, the standard was a 2 lb. package. With the advent of so many new pests and diseases, it moved to3 lb.
    1 1/2 lb. package would be very likely to meet it's demise before it obtained hive status.
     
  6. ablanton

    ablanton New Member

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    As stated above, try starting the package and then split it. I started a package on March 31 last year and split it in May. Both hives were booming this Spring.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a riverrat snip..
    I have heard of people trying this but havent heard of much success.

    tecumseh..
    this use to be a fairly common process although you were more likely to make up 4# packages and add two queens than to start off with a 3 # package which when split would only cover one frame. success was very much dependent on location and I never heard of anyone in the southern US doing this successfully. it took a very long season, as might be associated with some location along the northern states such as Michigan or Minnesota, to grow 2# of bees into something large enough to make a honey crop.
     
  8. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Not to mention that some 3 lb packages these days don't actually have a full 3 lbs of bees in them.
     
  9. Pilotbeekeeper

    Pilotbeekeeper New Member

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    Thanks to all. Glad i asked first. I'll work on plan B, to decide what becomes of the three queens arriving tomorrow. Perhaps some of my double deep Nucs are populated enough to split; we'll see.

    PBK