37 million bees just died. Here's our response.

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by ApisBees, Jul 23, 2013.

  1. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Recieved this email and I am passing it on.
    To bad they didn't find a picture of a honey bee rather than a bumble bee.

    From:
    "Kaytee Riek, SumOfUs.org" <us@sumofus.org>

    Subject: 37 million bees just died. Here's our response.

    Reply-To: us@sumofus.org
    bees are dying.jpg


    https://action.sumofus.org/a/bees-neonicotinoids-icg/4/2/?akid=1926.1027052.xFZGs1&rd=1&sub=fwd&t=1
    Last month, 50,000 dead bees were discovered littering a parking lot in Oregon. Then last week, a shocking 37 million bees were reported dead across a single farm in Ontario.

    After years of research, scientists have finally figured out what’s causing the massive bee die-offs all around the world, from China to the UK: It’s a class of dangerous pesticides called neonics. And here’s the wildest thing -- even though we know they’re killing the bees, in most parts of the world, neonics are still in widespread use.
    Independent American garden store owners are critical to the fight to stop neonics and save the bees. If you live in the US, your local garden store owner down the street probably sells neonics to your neighbors, who are in turn spraying them on their flowers and poisoning bees all around you. Collectively, these independent garden stores are the largest single group of commercial pesticide distributors in the world.
    That’s why Bonide, one of the largest corporate producers of neonics, is spending a pile of cash to try to buy the trust of these small business people. This August, Bonide is sponsoring the largest gathering of independent garden store owners in the world: The Independent Garden Center Show in Chicago. Bonide’s name -- and their spin -- will be everywhere: From the conference program to the exhibit hall.
    We can’t allow the pesticide industry to have the only voice there. So we came up with a crazy plan: We want to fly in activist beekeepers who’ve been watching their bees die for years, and buy them tickets to the conference. They’ll take their case directly to the garden center owners -- talking to them at their booths, distributing scientific research, holding press conferences and more. They’ll get the convention buzzing about the dangers of neonics, and convert garden center owners to the side of science, the bees, and our environment.
    Will you chip in $4 today to fly beekeepers to Chicago, to fight back against pesticide industry spin at the largest annual gathering of independent garden store owners in the world?
    The corporations that make neonics, like Bonide and Bayer, are on the defensive. Thanks in part to intense grassroots activism, the EU just implemented a trial ban against neonics for the next two years. But we have to keep up the momentum if we want to save bees worldwide -- and the US is the next key battleground.
    The global pesticide industry will do anything to protect its profits -- and as usual, the US is ground zero for corporations trying to ward off regulation at any cost. Neonics corporations are following the playbook written by Big Tobacco regarding lung cancer and Big Oil on climate change -- pouring millions into lobbying and fake science to stop decision-makers from taking action. They’re pumping out their own industry-backed studies to undermine the work of legitimate scientists, then claiming that there isn’t enough conclusive evidence to make a decision -- that we should continue to wait, for years, while the bees die off.
    And Big Pesticide is also taking its spin straight to America’s independent garden store owners -- because the prospect of these small business owners turning against them is terrifying. That’s why Bonide is sponsoring the conference in Chicago -- and it’s why we have to make sure the bees’ interests are represented in full force. The best people to speak for the bees are beekeepers themselves. If together we can raise at least $30,000, we can bus in a swarm of friendly beekeepers from across the region, buy them conference tickets, put them up in nearby hotels, print flyers and banners for them, and hold a huge press conference. If we raise enough money, we will even be able to fly in activists from Oregon that helped pass the neonics ban there.
    As the garden store owners pour into the convention hall, we want them to be met by this swarm of friendly beekeepers telling their stories. Once they return home, they’ll be as fired up as we are, and will sow the seeds of a national movement to get neonics off the market for good. If independent garden stores stopped selling the bee-killing pesticides, it would be a huge blow to the neonics industry and create massive additional momentum for legislation to save the bees. And the best part of all: Once independent garden stores begin banning neonics, the pressure will double down on major retailers like Home Depot and Lowe’s to follow suit.
    Can you donate $4 today to bring the bees’ plight to the attention of the small business people who are selling neonics in local communities?
    The bee die-offs in Oregon and Ontario aren’t flukes. This winter, the British Beekeepers Association recorded its worst loss in its history. In China, the situation has gotten so bad that farmers are forced to hand-pollinate their trees. In the biggest kill yet, a large commercial beekeeper in the United States watched in helpless horror as a mind-boggling 500 million of his bees died “like crazy†-- 80% of his entire total.
    Neonics are made to be water-soluble, so the vast majority is washed off the seeds in the first rainstorm. Over 90% of the pesticide washes away, to end up in the soil and groundwater, where they will persist for years -- the pesticides break down incredibly slowly, so that every year the crops are sprayed again, 80% of the pesticide from the previous year is still in the soil. Over the years, the surrounding ground and water continues to get more and more toxic, to the point that the pesticide is working its way up the food chain and killing off birds.
    We are reaching the point where our global ecosystem is straining, and the threat to the bees is becoming a threat to all of us. As bees die off, up to a third of the food we consume is threatened, and food prices are already being affected around the world. That’s why we have to step up now to get out the truth. Big pesticide companies may be trying to rewrite the record, but together the SumOfUs community can help cut through the noise and ensure the safety of our ecosystem for future generations.
    Click here to join with SumOfUs members all over the world to crowdfund a swarm of activist beekeepers to take on the pesticide industry in Chicago.

    Thank you for fighting for the bees,
    Kaytee, Claiborne, Taren, and the rest of us



    **********
    More information:

    The New York Times: Mystery Malady Kills More Bees; Heightening Worry on Farms, 28 March, 2013
    The New York Times: 2 Studies Point to Common Pesticide as a Culprit in Declining Bee Colonies, 29 March 2012

    [​IMG] [​IMG][​IMG]SumOfUs is a world-wide movement of people like you, working together to hold corporations accountable for their actions and forge a new, sustainable path for our global economy. You can follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

    Was this email forwarded to you? Click here to add yourself to SumOfUs.


     
  2. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    The bees in Oregon were Bumblebees. Applicator violated law with application on blooming Linden tree.
     

  3. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Thanks Camero7
    in the news reports the number is 25,000 bumble bees not 50,000 a slight exaggeration in numbers.
    He also states that "We can't say for sure that it is something that they put on the tree," Hatfield said, "because these trees are European Linden trees, which have been known to be toxic to bees."

    That is a lot of feral colonies considering that a large bumble bee colony only reaches a population of 200 and not all would leave the nests. This equates to a minimum of 150 nests, more likely 200+.
    [h=2]25,000 dead bees found in Wilsonville, Oregon[/h] Tim Becker
    KOIN 6 News
    Wed, 19 Jun 2013 22:31 CDT
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG]© KOIN 6 News
    A close-up of one of the 25,000 bees found either dead or dying in a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Jun 19, 2013.

    Experts are investigating why 25,000 bees were found dead or dying in a parking lot at a Target store in Wilsonville.

    The strange sight first caught shoppers' eyes a few days ago. It's still there Wednesday, clustered under blooming European Linden trees.

    "I've never seen an incident on this scale," said Pollinator Conservation Program Director Mace Vaughan.

    Experts believe this could be a poisonous species of the tree that caused them to die, or they may have been poisoned by insecticides.

    Conservationists Vaughan and Rich Hatfield were in Wilsonville Wednesday,filling test tubes with samples to take back to a lab. There they'll try to confirm either theory for the bees sudden deaths.

    [​IMG]© KOIN 6 News
    An expert collects some of the 25,000 bees found either dead or dying in a Target parking lot in Wilsonville, Jun 19, 2013.

    "When I was here Monday it was even more dramatic than it is today," Hatfield told KOIN 6 News. "There were bees raining out of trees."

    Vaughan said European Linden trees are often treated with insecticides because of the aphids that "rain down" nectar from the trees.

    But there's also a chance it's not insecticide at all. Vaughan took pollen samples and will test the buds and flowers from the trees.

    "We can't say for sure that it is something that they put on the tree," Hatfield said, "because these trees are European Linden trees, which have been known to be toxic to bees."

    They said they hope to have an answer within a couple of days.
    [​IMG]© The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
    About 25,000 dead or dying bees were seen in a parking lot at the Target in Wilsonville, June 18, 2013.

    "It brings it home," Hatfield said, "that we've got a lot of work to do to learn how to not harm these insects that are critical to our food supply."

    Bees are critical agriculture. If there really are 25,000 to 30,000 dead bees, which is how it appears, that would be hundreds of bumblebee colonies that are now dead
     
  4. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    thanks apis,
    i just caught up to this thread, and august's bee culture story on this. here is a link to bee cultures blog, the blog contains the entire article in bee culture magazine:
    [h=1]Pesticide Causes Massive Bumble Bee Massacre[/h]"In a suburban shopping mall in Wilsonville, OR, south of Portland, a massive loss of bumble bees has been attributed to use of the neonictinoid pesticide Safari."

    here is what kim flottum said about it, (editor and honey bee expert):

    "In Oregon in June a massive bumblebee kill was recorded due to a pesticide spray of linden trees in a parking lot of a big box store. Aphids were dripping aphid poo on cars, customers were complaining and a landscape company called in to fix the problem. They did. They sprayed those lindens that were in full bloom to kill the aphids. The bumblebees vising the linden blooms were killed by the thousands, littering the parking lot. The trees were bagged to keep more bees out, but damage was done. Ecologists estimated at least 300 nests were destroyed."
     
  5. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Doesn't mention that Linden trees are often poisonous to bees. There was another documented kill in Oregon that appears to be because of the Linden poison. Probably a synergistic interaction between the pesticide and the tree to cause such a big kill. Spraying pesticides on flowering plants is always problematic for bees.
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    yeah i hear ya camero, but in my mind thousands of bumble bees died because customers at target were *complaining about the poop on their pristine vehicles and the maintenance company took care of those complaints and sprayed the pesticide......the bumblebees didn't drop before that. i think the article, or another i read confirmed from beltsville, that the primary poison was the pesticide, and any 'poison' from the linden tree was minimal, if at all, or still very controversial. me thinks oh okay, this in part is a cya, and we need to point out these linden trees can be poisonous in a certain amount to pollinators.....whatever, doesn't fly by me. let me play the devils advocate......these were mature linden trees. there were no reports of dead bees beneath these lindens in years prior to this from naturally occurring poisons from these trees......?
    they didn't bag those trees in years past to protect pollinators.

    (*seriously? people complain about this stuff?....:doh:i know they do, just crazy, ought to have a turkey spread some hershey kisses on their vehicles, they would have something to complain about......:lol:)

    i have a sister that lives in hillsboro, and was in wilsonville just after the spray. gotta say what she said, she was horrified at the sight.

    anyways, not looking to disagree with you, just saying i wonder if target.....and all those folks that complained about poop on their vehicles, realized the impact of the loss of the pollinators, and appreciated all those bagged trees with pesticide smell emanating from the trees rather than the natural floral smell from the flowering, and the sight of thousands of bees dying and dead beneath them......oh i am guessing those pollinators were cleaned up fastidiously. and i am guessing all they noticed was the funny bagged trees, and maybe paid attention to the news reports. it went on deaf ears, except for those of us who care and get it.