5 frame nucs?

Discussion in 'Building plans, blueprints, and finished projects' started by rast, Feb 18, 2010.

  1. rast

    rast New Member

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    This is a open question for education only. I can't convince myself that I need 5 frame nucs to raise bees for myself. I use a 10 or 8 frame box with a sliding division board. As they grow, I add a frame or two. If it's a deadout, I just use that box and frames. Maybe climate has something to do with it and feeding. I can use inverted feeders year round. Just seemed to me that leaving them in them same box was less disruptive to them and less work for me.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You are right............
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I agree...

    the only advantages I can see to the smaller boxes are:
    1.. it takes less space to spread them about (for example in a mating yard).
    2.. might have some advantage in cooler areas.
    3.. in a very active shb area a 5 frame nuc is easier to crowd or pump up population.
     
  4. sqkcrk

    sqkcrk New Member

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    rast, if what you are doing works for you, keep doing it.

    The nice thing about 5 frame nucs, for me, is that I can make a bunch in one yard and take them to another yard rather easily. Then they won't go back home to their parent hive. But I have split hives in a yard and left them there too. I usually move the queen right part to another pallet. But you have to be careful not to move too much brood or they may not be able to keep it covered.