9 or 10 Frames

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by 40 Acre Bees, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. 40 Acre Bees

    40 Acre Bees New Member

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    Well it had been just over two weeks since we added our first shallow, foundation-less super and today we went in for an inspection. In one hive 9 of the 10 frames were drawn, but the there were two issues. First of all the comb was crazy all over the place and the frames were stuck together. When carefully trying to separate the frames I noticed some larvae in their also. What we did was carefully separated the frames and removed one frame and spaced them out for nine frames instead of 10. I had read this somewhere it might help. On this hive we also added another shallow foundation-less super so they could start on it. The other hive is about two weeks behind, it was only about 50% drawn on the shallow so we removed on frame, adjusted the width and closed it back up. I don't know if straight comb is a large concern because we will be doing crush and strain, but I am afraid the queen is going up into the shallow and I am not keen on using an excluder. Looking for you advice, thanks in advance.:roll:
     
  2. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    With crush and strain the spacing will not mater if the make the comb all over the place and crooked. When first drawing out combs, only having 9 frames will cause the bees to make more bur-comb and comb not in the proper place on the frame. In nature the combs are built 1 3/8" from center to center (the cell length of 2 worker brood and the bee space, which is the space for 2 bees to pass one another back to back but still close enough together so a bee can reach and travel from one comb to the next) putting 10 frames in gives this spacing. once the combs are built out this far dropping to 9 frames in the honey supers will allow the bees to draw out the comb a little thicker making it easier to uncap.
     

  3. pistolpete

    pistolpete New Member

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    To get bees to draw out straight foundationless frames, you have to place each foundationless frame between two frames that are already drawn straight on foundation. If you just give them a box of empty frames, they treat it like any other hollow and fill it with fanciful designs. Since you are doing the crush and strain, that's not a big deal, but it does makes inspections virtually impossible.
     
  4. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

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    Use a small popsicle stick on bottom edge of top frame as a guide. Make sure frames are pushed together tight and hive is level. I would use 10 frames. Another tip when you do the crush and strain leave about 3 rows of comb on the top of the frame so the bees will have a guide for next year.:thumbsup: