A complaint about my extractor

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by bamabww, Aug 21, 2012.

  1. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    I bought a Maxant 3100 electric extractor and have now used it 3 times. The only thing I've found that I don't like about it is where the discharge valve is located. It comes out the side, as each one I've ever seen does, and because of that leaves at least 8 ounces of honey in the bottom of the extractor.

    Why don't they locate the discharge on the bottom of the extractor near the edge where almost all the honey could drain? The valve on the bottom would make collecting the honey and cleaning the extractor so much easier.
     
  2. CharlieB

    CharlieB New Member

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    The reason honey gates are located where they are is if they were located at the very bottom it would weaken the structure of the barrel weld to the bottom. Simply tilt you Maxant forward a bit and let it drain. I screwed a large spatula to a sawed off broom handle that enables me to reach in between the frame basket and barrel to scrape all the excess through the honey gate.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    some of the larger and much more expensive extractor do have center/bottom drains. I am of course cheap and don't have one of these expensive rigs so I do as CharleB does and use a couple of wood block to provide some tilt for the extractor for it to slowly drain.
     
  4. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    I hear you, Wayne, and feel your pain. I also have the same extractor. I LOVE the extrator except for what you have pointed out. BUT, all the ones I have ever seen in the same catagory (six to 15 frame extractor) has the honey gate at the bottom on the side. I don't have the legs on my extractor so I stack wood on the backside after spinning to help it along while draining.
     
  5. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    This is the same unit I intend on buying soon (likely be placing an order next week).

    Couldn't you add in a small stop-cock drain valve at the lowest point on the bottom of the bowl? I could see this as a useful addition to remove this last amount of honey, even if I needed to weld an additional layer of steel to mount this into it myself. (I have SS feedwire and tri-mix shielding gas on the welder at work.)
     
  6. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    What's the problem? --when you're finished extracting, you have to disassemble the baskets in order to do a proper job of washing it out anyway. While the baskets are out I tip the drum over on its side and drain just about all the remaining honey. The last drops are scraped out with a stainless steel spatula. Before returning the basksets to the drum, I pour my collected honey from the plastic pails let it "settle" till ready (cover the drum with a fabric to keep it clean) and use the gate of the drum to fill my bottles.
    Easy as pie--just needs a bit of patience.
     
  7. CharlieB

    CharlieB New Member

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    Not really. I have yet to take mine apart. I use hot water and dish soap from the honey house shower and have a long narrow scrub brush. Clean up is less than 5 minutes!
     
  8. BoilerJim

    BoilerJim New Member

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    Ef,

    Actually on the Maxant model, Jake - the owner of Maxant said that we not take the baskets out. :rules: Thus, I give a small squirt of dishwashing liquid and crank up the outside water hose and give it a good hard washing. Occasionally there may be a small bit of wax stuck here or there but it never bothers anything.

    Perhaps other models of extractors are made to disassemble for cleaning......?
     
  9. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    The world keeps advancing. I have to work hard to keep up. It's a good thing I have the forum to make sure that I don't remain in the middle ages of beekeeeping.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I myself prefer middle age beekeepers.... keeping thing simple does have it's own merits???
     
  11. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    wayne,
    what charlieb said, it works like a charm. if you don't want to make a tank scraper, you can buy them, and they do work well.

    ef and tec said:
    "The world keeps advancing. I have to work hard to keep up. It's a good thing I have the forum to make sure that I don't remain in the middle ages of beekeeeping."

    "I myself prefer middle age beekeepers.... keeping thing simple does have it's own merits??? "

    ditto....:lol:
     
  12. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    Yeah, that works for me also. I lay the water hose (approx. 100') out in the sun, fill it with water, and let it set a while. It usually has more than enough hot water to clean my extractor.
     
  13. bamabww

    bamabww Active Member

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    I called Maxant and asked them the same question in my original post. He said with the slope of the bottom, I'd have the same problems as I have now. I asked why don't you fabricate a little pocket that would be lower than the slope and allow the honey to collect their and install the drain valve in that pocket. Wouldn't be competitive / cost effective in the market was the reply.

    So it boils down to this: it works well enough the way it is. The advice / solution you offered with the long handled scraper will indeed eliminate my complaint. Well maybe not eliminate but ....
     
  14. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I've got an old, no stand, home-made extractor that has a valve coming out of the bottom. It gets every drop, but when you go to store it the valve is sticking out of the bottom and sets on the ground or floor. No problem if you have a stand. Kind of awkward if you don't. Since Maxant sells their mixer with or without the stand it's probably just a design decision that works well for both uses.
     
  15. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    Cleaning Extractor

    I was advised to use COLD water for cleaning out an extractor.

    With HOT water, residual wax may melt and leave a film on the surfaces. :thumbsup:
     
  16. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    What's wrong with a residual surface covering of wax? Especially bee's wax. Those who have non-stainless steel parts might be very happy to have those parts wax coated.
    For many years I used an extractor with a tank made of galvanized sheet metal. When the galvanization started to wear off, I coated the exposed surfaces with bee's wax. It was great. It even sealed a minute leak that had developed in one of the seams.
     
  17. CharlieB

    CharlieB New Member

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    I've washed our club extractors with cold water and it takes allot longer leaving wax stuck everywhere. There is no wax film that remains when using hot water that I've seen.
     
  18. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I've got a new galvanized can that I'm using with my extractor. I had a couple of small leaks and was trying to come up with a way to seal them up and still be honey safe. WAX! Why didn't I think of that? I've got a 1/2 pound of bee's wax just sitting on my kitchen counter!
    mr_burns.png Excellent!
     
  19. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    If I managed to give you the idea about waxing the can, I'll add in my "patented" (a-la-Tecumseh) method for coating it with the wax: Wait for a nice sunny day and place the can directly in the light of the shining sun. It doesn't take too long for the drum to get hot enough to melt the wax. Place a chunk of wax in the drum and tilt it all around till the parts you want coated are covered. It's not a difficult technique to perfect. You can either work in the sun or do the job quickly indoors before the heat dissipates. The second method should give you a thicker coating, depending on how much wax you use, how fast you tilt etc.
    Enjoy yourself.:grin: