A few observations and questions after my inspection today.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Gator_56, May 24, 2012.

  1. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    I installed my hive on May 1st. I have a Russian queen and she was shipped with what I assume are Italian workers. I just finished up an inspection, and I noticed a lot of Russian workers this time around so I know things are going good, or at least appear to be to my novice eyes.

    I found capped brood on the first 4 frames, front and back, with some mix of uncapped brood and eggs as well on each of the first 4 frames and all had capped honey on the top and sides of each frame. Frame 5 had a few larvae just in the center, maybe 200 on one side and about 50 on the other with capped honey again on the top and sides.

    Frame 6 was starting to be drawn out on the front side(side closest to the brood). The other 3 have not been touched.

    I finally found the queen( I guess i missed her the first time) on frame 1. She looked good and was busy scurrying around.

    A few questions....

    1) I use a hive top feeder and they are no longer taking 1:1, should I clean that out and replace it with clean water?

    2) I noticed that they were drawing comb out and connecting frames towards the center of the hive. Last time I inspected I left, what I tried to make, even gaps between each frame. Is that why they that or is this normal? This time I closed the gaps across all the frames and left a larger gap between the first frame and the wall. Is that right or no?

    3) How long does it take normally(and I know there are lot of variables here) for a package hive to draw out 7/10 frames?Averagely speaking.

    All in all things looked pretty good. The capped honey I saw looked nice clean, very light in color. I saw some pollen cells down closer to the brood. Everything seems to be coming along nicely.
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You should close all frames tightly and leave the extra space equally between wall and 1, and wall and 10.

    Remove the feeder and take it in the house.

    More frames will be drawn quickly as the capped brood emerges.
     

  3. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    I have one of these type of feeders... g56.jpg and was planning on using it for water. Is this not the best idea?
     
  4. kebee

    kebee Active Member

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    No puts to much mositure in the hive and you do not want that.

    kebee
     
  5. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    ahhh!!! Thanks I hadn't even considered that! I saw a recipe for a 5 gallon bucket with holes drilled a few inches from the top and some styrofoam peanuts floating on top. Has anyone used this for water? I'm in town and wanted to make sure they had easy access to fresh H2O.
     
  6. Zulu

    Zulu Member

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    Fresher the less likely they will take it

    Dripping tap with bowl, old drum with floating wood, chicken Waterer with stones, all work.

    Just put it in a place close to be suitable for you to fill or check it, they will find it.
     
  7. bamabww

    bamabww New Member

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    Didn't use a 5 gallon bucket but did use a smaller pan with holes near top and with wood chips. It worked fine. If they already have a water source, don't be surprised if they don't use your 5 gallon bucket.
     
  8. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    If your bees are not accepting sugar syrup, it's because they are getting enough nectar to satisfy themselves for the moment. As I am sure you know or will find out shortly, the nectar flow in Florida, will peter out in a few weeks, until; mid august there about. It is during this time frame that your bees will need to be fed, and probably heavily due to the brood volume being raised at the time. Pollen will be there, but the flowers blooming during that time frame have little nectar value. You mentioned the bees storing honey in the top and corners, that's the normal pattern of arraigning the brood nest for feeding the brood.
    Barry
     
  9. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    what barry is referencing and quite common for a lot of places is often termed 'the dearth'... quite typically created by excess heat, little rain and consequently no flowers blooming over some unspecified period of time. Yankee beekeepers must endure winter and southern beekeepers must endure 'the dearth'.