A few random questions

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by senilking, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. senilking

    senilking New Member

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    First of all, THEY MADE IT!

    Lol, I didn't have much time at the end of last year and was pretty sure one of the hives was going into winter without a queen, and the other one was not full strength. Lots of swarms over summer, ended up with two main hives and three small ones, and I swear queens kept moving from one hive to another. Finally ended with two hives and wasn't sure if either would winter. What can I say, first year beekeeping, lol. I finally just said oh well, and let them sort it out. I kind of took some advice without knowing from the "How to do it book of beekeeping" - "When you are confronted with some problem in the apiary and you do not know what to do, then do nothing. Matters are seldom made worse by doing nothing and are often made much worse by inept intervention."
    Now both hives ripping and roaring flying around getting pollen like crazy, so I guess they both have queens just looking at the amount of bees in each and seeing younger bees. I plan to do my first inspection for the year and get everything cleaned and ready to start switching to all mediums tomorrow.

    Anyways, I was just wondering if anyone has thought about how beekeeping in the tropics would be like. Where the winter never really comes, but it never gets extremely hot either. Would the bees simply collect all year round and how would not having to winter mess with them? Does anyone here actually do it? I don't know much about the tropics, but it seems like it would be a lot easier since wintering seems to interrupt the hive when it finally gets to full strength. There might be dearths yearly that cause essentially same thing as a winter?


    I was also wondering if anyone knew about a way to share your hives on HiveTracks? I plan to start using it, and I've got a lot of people always asking about the bees. I figure if they could see my notes and whatnot, they could understand better what I'm doing even when I don't get to talk to them or forget to mention it. And I've always wondered why something is so much more interesting when it's someone you know doing it, even if they don't have a clue what they are doing?
     
  2. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    The biggest problem in the tropics is parasites and diseases that host on the brood -- Varroa, American foulbrood, European foulbrood, Sacbrood, Chalkbrood, etc. Most Acaricides do not work in the tropics because there is always a sizeable population sealed with pupa, or the queen and drones are killed before their time.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2014

  3. senilking

    senilking New Member

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    Another question. When I was doing the inspection today, I noticed what looked like red dust or pollen on the top of several bee's heads. And now I've noticed that one of the frames I removed to switch to mediums has a lot of pollen, and some of it is bright red. I just now learned what henbit is, which is amazing since I see it all the time. Would have never guessed it's pollen was bright red. But why would they have it on their heads? Maybe they all have pollen on them, and I just don't notice the one's that aren't bright red. I didn't get a picture, but I do of the pollen stores. Just want to make sure it's actually pollen and not some kind of fungus.

    IMG_7319.jpg

    Good news is, I saw the queen right away, and she's got several frames of brood laid. I also got to watch a showdown between 6 honeybees and a red wasp, watch several bees glue down a hive beetle, and watched several waggle dances. Also cause a feeding frenzy on the porch by leaving this frame there too long, and got to look "fearless" to some friends by walking out there and picking it up sans protective equipment. People just don't believe how much they don't want to sting you, not that I would have believed someone before keeping bees.
     
  4. Capt44

    Capt44 New Member

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    I use a program called Bee Tight to keep up with my record keeping for the bees.
     
  5. CeeGee

    CeeGee New Member

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    they pack pollen in the cells with their head, so sometimes they have a little left on there.
     
  6. senilking

    senilking New Member

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    Oh yeah, I remember reading that somewhere now. Thanks.

    How long has BeeTight been around? I just don't see many people commenting about it.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I always like to give a round of applause to any first year beekeeper who has been successful.... :clap:








    ;
     
  8. senilking

    senilking New Member

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    Figured out why she had red pollen on her head. I was watching them collect henbit, and got curious and got a closer look. When they stick their head in the flower to get the nectar, the pollen is on the top of the flower. That way everytime they go to a new flower, it rubs off on it.
     
  9. jorre

    jorre New Member

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    BeeTight has been around a couple of years. For me the app isn't up to date with what web apps should be like today. I've created a more modern application that works flawlessly on any device (even smartphones) simply for that reason.

    If you'd like to give it a go, feel free to try it at https://www.mybeekeeper.com (you can export all of your data any give time as I believe you should be the owner of your data at all times).