A First Timer and a Bee Tree

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Papakeith, Apr 4, 2013.

  1. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'll get right to it.

    My nephew has been clearing out 5 acres of woods to make a new hay field on our farm. While cutting yesterday he felled a fairly good sized tree and then, trying to find out how far the rot had gone, made a few plunge cuts. The second or third plunge cut started spewing "goop" as he put it. It was about that time that he noticed some bees coming out to say hello. It was ~40 degrees so the bees weren't exactly active. He stopped at that point and moved onto a different tree.

    Here's where I come in.

    I got the call from him last night around 8:00pm. He took me out to the tree this morning. There are quite a few felled trees and brush between the bee tree and our access road right now.

    Here's where I'm at:

    I now have a colony in a tree that has been laid on it's side with at least one cut that has compromised the integrity of the hive. It has been on it's side for a day now.

    What is the best way to proceed? Is there a best way to proceed?

    Do I:
    • leave them alone until it gets warmer? daily temps right now might hit 50 deg. F
    • treat them like a swarm and cut them out of the tree?
    • cut the trunk free of the remainder of the tree and haul it out of the woods?

    Help! :)

    thanks,
    Keith
     
  2. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

    Messages:
    2,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I didn't think about this before, but I wonder if it should be a rescue mission. Because, the comb is probably all jacked up now right? It may be all detached and debris everywhere?? I am still looking forward to pics!
     

  3. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That's kinda what I was thinking. The comb might be all collapsed
     
  4. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    If I recall correctly, Iddee has several pictures on how he handled a hive in a felled tree. The season and accessability aren't the same, but the manipulations should be. Try to look it up, or maybe Iddee will come to your rescue with words of wisdom.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    • cut the trunk free of the remainder of the tree and haul it out of the woods?
    Try to orient it the way it stood in the woods, including the entrance facing "south?" or however it was. Then on a sunny 70 F. plus day, use hammer and wedges to split it and do a removal.
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    keith,
    i don't know that this will help but texasnewbee posted a thread and a link to a video:
    thread here:

    bee tree removal from downed tree in texas

    his video:
    [video=youtube;XpaRDZEVri4]https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=XpaRDZEVri4[/video]
     
  7. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks Riverbee. I have watched that one. I also saw the one other by jpthebeeman.

    It will be another day or so before I can even get a tractor near to the tree to pull it out or put it upright.
    2013-04-04_17-28-09_449.jpg 2013-04-04_17-35-45_463.jpg 2013-04-04_17-37-53_553.jpg 2013-04-04_17-26-50_564.jpg
     
  8. DLMKA

    DLMKA New Member

    Messages:
    429
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would say that the comb shouldn't have much honey in it so won't be super heavy and prone to collapse upon impact. Prop it back upright until you can get to it easily.
     
  9. wadehump

    wadehump New Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    being that it is low on the trunk there may not bee a lot of damage
     
  10. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    good luck keith, keep us posted!
     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I think this is an imporatant thought. :thumbsup:
    The one time I was called to a dropped tree, the colony was about 30' up. It got dropped to the ground, dragged to a clearing, and was being junked up when it was finally discovered, mid Jan, -18 C.
    We tried but they really never had a chance.
     
  12. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I got an early start today. I fired up a tractor and headed out to the field where the tree was.

    2013-04-06_09-46-35_943.jpg 2013-04-06_09-50-29_568.jpg
    My nephew had made some progress, but there was still a fair amount of brush and downed trees to move before I could actually access the "bee tree"

    2013-04-06_10-00-37_503.jpg

    Once cleared I looped a chain around the tree and fired up the chainsaw. From there it was a pretty straight forward to stand it up and push it firmly into the ground.

    2013-04-06_10-34-36_98.jpg 2013-04-06_10-00-37_503.jpg 2013-04-06_10-56-54_507.jpg

    I went back later and the bees were merrily buzzing around.

    2013-04-06_11-12-15_897.jpg
     
  13. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    :coolphotos: We look forward to following further developments. So far, good work. :thumbsup:
     
  14. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

    Messages:
    3,048
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    wow keith, thanks for the pics!
     
  15. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Good job. :thumbsup:
     
  16. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    2,752
    Likes Received:
    11
    Trophy Points:
    38
  17. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

    Messages:
    2,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  18. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

    Messages:
    1,322
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Nice work good pics.
    Barry
     
  19. tmrschessie

    tmrschessie New Member

    Messages:
    385
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Really enjoying this one, with all the trees being bulldozed down around here I might be able to use some of these techniques...Thanks for the pictures and video. Tom
     
  20. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It was a busy week.

    I decided to move the trunk over to my side of the road. that way I could keep a better eye on it.

    I moved it this past Friday. It was cold and rainy. I figured that as the temps came up moving the hive would become more and more problematic. As it turned out, cold and rainy worked out perfectly.

    2013-04-12_08-17-55_923.jpg
    Fast forward to today.

    I've been talking about this to local keeps, and in the chat room. The advice I got was to add a bottom board to the top of the trunk and drill through that board and into the tree until I made a path to the colony. Then, plug up the current entrances which would hopefully force the bees to go up through the trunk and into the deep that I would place on the bottom board.

    Well, I was going to create a full blown bottom board when Perry said, "why not use just a piece of plywood, a deep, and a inner cover with an entrance?

    Nice! A simple solution. And I already had all the pieces on hand. I had a plan, now it was time to execute.


    The trunk as it stands is /was 8 ft tall or so. My game plan was to chop about two feet off, drill through the trunk until I hit the colony, add a piece of plywood, then a deep. an inner cover with an entrance, and an outer cover. simple, right?


    2013-04-14_09-37-49_980.jpg


    1. cut the section off of the tree

    2013-04-14_09-47-12_800.jpg


    2. drill a hole
    2013-04-14_10-02-11_697.jpg



    3. add a bottom board
    2013-04-14_09-48-59_227.jpg

    4. add the hive body and the other bits n pieces
    2013-04-14_10-02-31_944.jpg 2013-04-14_09-52-29_192.jpg

    5. plug up the existing entrances to try to force them up and into the deep.
    2013-04-14_10-05-46_396.jpg

    and finally, wait. This is going to be the toughest part.
    2013-04-14_10-15-26_705.jpg