A List for 1st time Extracting?

Discussion in 'Products of the Hive' started by DonMcJr, Aug 5, 2012.

  1. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Can anyone take the time to make a list for someone extracting Honey for the 1st time?

    I'm ordering my extractor next Friday and don't wanna start and say, " Oh crap I need XXX and I have to order it and wait for it!"

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I'm a first timer too, so here's my list so far.


    • space where my wife won't stop me from making a sticky mess
    • Extractor
    • bin to decap in
    • knife of some sort to decap with.
    • bucket to catch honey after extraction
    • paint filter to go between honey gate on extractor and bucket
    • bottles and caps
    • labels
    • maybe a funnel
    • wax melter
    • latex gloves

    That's all I can think of right now.
     

  3. CharlieB

    CharlieB New Member

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    To add to Papakeith's list

    Don't forget:
    Cappings scratcher to get into those frame crevices.
    Honey gate and lid on food grade bucket(s) to catch honey after extraction.
    Duct tape to elevate and secure paint filter into your bucket to drain properly. (I like to use this double sieve strainer HH440 instead of a paint filter) http://www.mannlakeltd.com/beekeeping-supplies/page92.html
    Hot knife.
    Cold knife to scrape burr comb off your frames to fit in extractor basket.
    Hot water for clean-up.
     
  4. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Honey is a beautiful sticky mess. Mop and pail, water close by to wash hands, arms, hair, cellphone, Oh and tools that are covered with honey. A wash pan or pail will do if sink is not close.
    A bee tight area cause if the bees find a way in they will make the job worse. If extracting in the garage or basement honey on the concrete floor will cause it to pit eventually, some thing to keep in mind. For the sake of a happy wife try to contain the mess. A drop of honey doesn't go away it just keeps getting thinner and thinner and spreading father away. Most the items you need after uncapping and extracting and straining are looked after, can be pilfered from the kitchen although you'll have to replace them cause she wont want them back covered with wax and stained with propolis. Trust me I know from experience.
     
  5. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

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    I would suggest having extra 5 gallon pails to receive the honey immediately from the extractor and allow most of the wax to rise overnight. Filtering seems to be the bottleneck and it sure speeds things up if you can do that later. An extra set or two of filter screens is a good idea.
    The bin to decap in with a pin to rest the frame on is a must. The right height and solid saves your hands and your back. If you can, avoid using any of your regular utensils as the wax film is a bear to get rid of and it will haunt you if you get it in the dishwasher.
    Lots of disposable plastic

    Cleanup is the biggest part of the job and no glory!
     
  6. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    Off the top of my head, I can add a hive box to hold the frames after extracting.

    Also a camera to catch that first drop of honey!

    2012-06-02_17-54-54_283.jpg

    We kept the air conditioning off in the shed so it was about 90F when we did the extracting. It was hot, but I think it helped things flow (pun intended!) :)

    Get some plastic table cloths or shower curtains at the dollar store to cover up tables and stands and such. They clean easy or throw away even easier.

    You're going to mess up. Don't get frustrated. Smile and learn.

    A helper is an invaluable asset.

    I'll probably think of more, but that's a start (in addition to the great lists above).

    Good luck! :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2012
  7. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Thanks everyone that responed so far and keep it coming!
     
  8. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    Ok, just finished extracting my first super.

    if you are doing more than one super, you're gonna need a bigger bucket! multiple buckets.
    Either don't filter at all from the extractor, or have multiple filters of different mesh sizes so the finer filter won't clog up as easily.
    Be amazed at how much honey really is in one medium super!
    Have fun, I know I did. :)
     
  9. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Slowmodem said: "A helper is a invaluable asset" It is amazing what you will have to pick up once your hands are covered in honey and propolis. :wink:
    That said, Papakeith is right, "Have fun" :yahoo:
     
  10. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    1. I might add an answering machine turned on. You can bet that the phone will ring when your up to your elbows in honey.
    2. I agree with CharlieB. A FOOD GRADE bucket(s) with a gate is great. You won't need a funnel if you have a gate.
    3. I agree with Slowmodem as well. A helper, because your back is going to get tired really fast.
    4. An extra large bin to collect your wax cappings in. I think that saves a lot of mess. I use a very large food grade bin.
    5. A refractometer. Maybe some of the seasoned beekeeps have a way of knowing the moisture content, but I used a refractometer my first time and I still have some of that "special" honey around.

    Things I didn't need right away and can purchase later:
    1. Bottles, caps, etc. because I held the honey in 5 gallon food grade buckets. Canning jars worked just fine for those initial samples.
    2. Wax melter. I just bagged it and put it in the freezer so I could deal with it later.
    3. A decapping knife. A bread knife, heated in hot water worked my first time.

    Caveat: Don't use cheesecloth to strain. You will contaminate your honey with bits of fiber.

    Enjoy your first time. It's a learning experience.
     
  11. DonMcJr

    DonMcJr New Member

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    Looks like I'll be good to go with what I'm ordering Friday! Thanks all!
     
  12. indypartridge

    indypartridge New Member

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    Many good ideas so far.
    I use trashbags to set supers on. As Slowmodem said, cover everything with cheap plastic that you can throw away afterwards.
    Get a large spatula for getting the honey off the sides of the extractor, buckets, etc.
    My uncapping "tanks" are plastic bins from Walmart - the kind that slide under a bed. I have a notched piece of wood to lay across the top to rest the frame on while I am uncapping.