A new stand

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Papakeith, Sep 16, 2012.

  1. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I finally got around to building a stand for my hives. Yeah, I know, the cinder blocks were fine, but I had some posts and some quick-Crete. I think ill hold off on cutting the posts down to size until I find out whether or not I like the hive height.

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  2. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    That looks sturdy!
     

  3. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Save the blocks. You will catch swarms next spring. :D
     
  4. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    You've got a nice work space between the hives. You could probably even fit in one more and have room to work, but how do you manage to hoist those supers to that height---use a ladder? Stand on the frame?
    Maybe I'm just seeing it through the eyes of a "shortie" (getting shorter).:rolling::rotfl:
     
  5. Big Bear

    Big Bear New Member

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    looks pretty good to me. I'm 6'4" though. I use pallets standing on cement blocks for hive stands myself. Not as pretty as yours but in the same way of working.
     
  6. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I'm a tallie :D
    6'3" I found the blocks to be a bit low for me. The stand is adjustable I think it is set at 16 inches right now. At some point I will find my best working height. Once I get the height where I want it I'll cut the posts flush and I'll gain 8 inches on either end. I'm hoping to fit 4 on this stand, but three may end up more workable.

    Yes, I'm saving the blocks. I've already started clearing more space in preparation for next season.



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  7. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I built 16 in. tall benches out of CCA lumber (2x4's and 2x6's) and inclosed it with chicken wire to keep skunks and coon's at bay. They are built to hold two hives (one on each end) and long enough to put another hive in the middle like yours look. I use the middle space to set top covers, supers, and hive bodies on, while working them, makes working them easier.:thumbsup: I built these stands for the hives i keep in wooded areas, i think your going to like it. Jack
     
  8. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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  9. Minz

    Minz Member

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    I did mine with 2x8's and set them on the blocks. I also did Joist hanger strong ties for extra strength. I will post a picture (if I have enough posts to be allowed). You can see my cross braces are close enough to allow me to turn a center hive at 90 degrees so that I can put it at an angle and not work in front of the opening. I set mine behind the weeping cherry tree and painted them the same color as the house. See the queen castles stacked on top since it is already out of room. I used three full length 2x8. Cut the third one for the cross ties.

    IMG-20120918-00204.jpg IMG-20120918-00205.jpg
     
  10. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    My favorite hive stands are very unesthetic but most practical and convenient: of a good height, light, transportable, strong etc.
    I like to use plastic crates (like those used for 12 large sized soda bottles or for other items, like fruits or vegetables). If you find the right size, they fit beautifully underneath the hive floor and are nice and stable. They can easily be moved closer or further apart, according to the space you need for the number of hives you've got and the configuration in which you want to place them.
     
  11. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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  12. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    it would be prettier in pink :wink: !

    a big bear snip...
    I use pallets standing on cement blocks for hive stands myself.

    tecumseh:
    I am not quite as tall as big bear but most of my stands in the field are now common bricks that hold two pallets just slightly off the ground. this seems to be a good height for me. a bit further south this would not work so well due to the high possibility of large poisonous snake.
     
  13. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    This is the first of what I'm sure will be many experiments on what works for me. The cinder blocks and pallets sounds like something that is worth a try.
    One thing I was trying to achieve is stability of the hive during high winds. The stand I build now has eyelets so I can bungee the hive down to the stand during heavy winds, or hurricane conditions.


    Yes, I'm fully aware that I'm probably overthinking and overcomplicating this. . . It's what I do :mrgreen:
     
  14. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    pk:
    "Yes, I'm fully aware that I'm probably overthinking and overcomplicating this. . . It's what I do :mrgreen:"

    :lol:

    i use heavy duty pallets, some of my hives are on pallets on a concrete base, other times i do as tecumseh does with bricks under, or flat rocks to balance the pallet if the ground is uneven. pallets are nice and handy for smaller hives, nucs or as you say high winds, you can strap them down.
     
  15. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    I like the block and 4x4s stands, this is my new yard under construction
     

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  16. Slowmodem

    Slowmodem New Member

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    I've heard that if your hives are on long boards, and you jar one hive, the vibration(s) will be conducted down the boards, and the other(s) will be jarred as well, leading to many agitated bees.
     
  17. Papakeith

    Papakeith New Member

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    I've heard that too. I'm not sure I buy into it. Before I built this stand I used one hive to hold my tools, the rock from the cover, and the occasional medium while I was inspecting. I never noticed any raised agitation levels on either of my colonies. Of course, I only have a sample of two to work from right now.
     
  18. Zookeep

    Zookeep Active Member

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    I have never had it happen to me and like every1 else I have dropped the lid or inner cover by mistake and never seen the bees in the other hives even notice
     
  19. Minz

    Minz Member

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    Apis, the hive D6 is real strong and has been. I flipped it 90 since the bees I got that hive from were wicked mean. The D7 hive it is pointed at is real weak. Maybe they didn't like flying straight and preferred the corner (LOL). As for the noise going through all the long boards the amount of weight on the rack seems to dampen vibration from one hive to the other. I pile the Queen castle on the other boxes, one left one right, and have yet to run into issues.