A question about what to do next?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by hlhart2001, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    We have two deeps and a shallow with no intention of taking the honey this year(new package, want to give them every opportunity to make it thru our long cold winter). I put the shallow on 2 weeks ago and have not checked yet(trying not to love them to death this first year:wink:). So if I open up and they have gone to town and 7 out of 10 frames are drawn out and let's pretend it's capped honey...do I put another shallow on top of that?(if we weren't going to take the honey). If I do and they draw that out do I leave both shallows on for the winter? I don't want the bees to have to use up more energy than they have to in order to stay warm(more hive bodies, more room to heat) Also then if we have two shallows filled with honey do I need to feed in the fall(again the conundrum of feeding). Thanks for any and all anwers in advance.:smile: Halley
     
  2. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Do you belong to a bee club or have a mentor? They would know how much honey to leave on or if you need to feed in you location. Here in SW Mo. we can usually get by on 60 to 80lbs of honey in a bad winter. Jack
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    It is more of an locale thing like Jack says. I would think you should be fine with a top deep full and the shallow would be insurance. I can't imagine needing two shallows. If they fill two shallows I would use one............................for you! :thumbsup:
     
  4. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    good advice by jack and perry, local wintering needs. you would place another super on if 7 of the 10 frames are capped in the first super, if you have two supers that are filled, one can be removed as perry said. leave the other on in the event of a nectar dearth, this can always be taken off later as well or as long as they have enough stores in the fall to get them through winter, two supers are usually not necessary. about feeding, the only time you would need to feed in the fall is if the hive body weight is not up to the standard for your area.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    OK, I agree 2 supers may not be necessary. BUT, what would it hurt to leave 2, even 3 full supers on? If they are all full, the cluster will stay even with the bottom of the honey cache, no matter how far up it extended. The bees do not heat the whole hive, just in and around the cluster. The honey above acts as an insulator.

    If I had 5 full supers on and didn't want the honey, I would leave them all on. Taking into consideration SHB before the cold set in.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a Jack snip..
    Here in SW Mo. we can usually get by on 60 to 80lbs of honey in a bad winter.

    tecumseh:
    consumption of stores is largely a product of length of winter time and winter time temperature. actually it appears consumption of stores by the bees in a winter time cluster is very small... brood rearing (created by spikes in temperature) does consume a lot of stores. sounds to me like you do not need to feed such a hive in the fall unless you wanted to add some kind of medication (for example fumidil to limit the possibility of nosema).

    like iddee 2 or more boxes left certainly have little downside. come spring time the first inspection will fully inform you of how much stores were required to maintain the hive thru winter since how far they eat up into the existing honey cap will be self evident. if there is a down side in leaving a hive in this way???? such hive typically will NEED to be split early in year two or swarming is quite likely.
     
  7. Beeboy

    Beeboy New Member

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    I would be nervous about them having enough bees next spring to defend that big of an area. It's a open invitation for wax moths and such if you leave more boxes on than they need.
     
  8. srvfantexasflood

    srvfantexasflood New Member

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    If you leave the supers on for winter feed, be sure to take off the queen excluder. You didn't mention that queen excluder was in place. Just a precautionary warning.
     
  9. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Here in SW. Mo. i have inspected questionable hives on warm days (45F to 60F) and have found small patches of brood,and as the temp. gets warmer the more active the queen gets. By mid March (sometimes) or April the hive has built up enough to protect it's self from wax moth or shb. With the night time temp. in the 30;s and 40's wax moth and shb don't become a problem here (SW. Mo.) until June. This will very in other parts of the US of A. Jack
     
  10. hlhart2001

    hlhart2001 New Member

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    Thanks for all the tips...we are not putting a queen excluder on this year. Someone mentioned night time temps of 30's and 40's...this year we had frosts into middle to end of June. I am going in this week although it has been stormy the last couple days...raining cats and dogs right now. Of course I worry about the bees not foraging and I am sure they are not happy of being stuck in the "house". Halley