A question that stumped me.

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by PerryBee, Aug 1, 2013.

  1. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    I was tending to a hive that I keep in a families backyard a couple of days ago. This was a cut-out I did last year and moved to their yard. They have a daughter that is my son's age and she was doing a science project on bees, and both her and her Mom have been very active with the bees when I am there working the hive.
    Out of the blue, the young lady asked me a question that caught me off guard, one I had never been asked before, and I thought it was rather good so I thought I would post it here.
    How high can a bee fly? :grin:
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    A bee cannot fly in more than about 15 mile per hour wind. It would be my opinion that the prevailing winds would limit the height of their flight, depending on the weather of the day.
     

  3. Lburou

    Lburou Member

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    I have kept bees at 6,000 ft elevation. There is (was) a USDA bee lab in Laramie, Wyoming at 7,100 ft.. When you go up to high altitude (12-14,000 ft), you won't see any honey bees. I think I read something about 8,000 ft being the limit, but where the limit actually is, I don't know. No flowers in the sky anyhow ;)
     
  4. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    I have heard old timers say that virgin queens will only mate with the strongest, highest flying drones, so when you find the drone congregation area, you will probably find your answer.:lol: Jack
     
  5. lazy shooter

    lazy shooter New Member

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    Pun of the day, "there are no flowers in the sky." Also, I was shocked to learn that PerryBee is ever stumped about anything. Can anyone imagine PerryBee not having a "come back" to any question. I think it's pie time for mom and daughter.
     
  6. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    the answer is as high as they need to but no higher. If the bees can fly out of the hive and make it to the foraging area flying only a few feet of the ground that is what they will do. If there is a high fence to get the bees over the neighbors lot, or trees between the bees and nectar source the bees will fly over them.
    An old timer that he and his sons use to run about 6000 colonies said that when he took bees into the mountain for fire weed honey they would go up the logging road and drop 2 hives at every 50 feet in elevation in the early morning and in the evening they would head back up and pick up the hives that were still light and drop all the hives at the elevation the nectar was flowing. He felt that bees would stay at the altitude and work flowers that were not producing much nectar, rather than fly up or down the mountian for plants producing greater amounts or sweeter nectar.