A second split?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by heinleinfan, Apr 20, 2012.

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  1. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    I had an empty hive box and an extremely over-full hive so I performed a hive split 18 days ago.

    The strong hive was packed full of bees, already a lot of honey and had a good number of drones. New split hive seems to be going just fine, we're checking again this weekend for a queen (we left the queen in the original hive) and if we don't find one we're ordering one. That hive seems just fine though, lots of foragers coming and going and they're pretty mellow.

    I popped the lid on the over-full hive today...we removed 6 frames of brood and 4 of food when we did the split...and it is full of bees. Again. Two deeps and a small super, and it's totally full of bees. It's like "July" full of bees rather than "April" full of bees.

    My community garden has a hive that did not survive the winter, it was a new package, and we're planning on re-packaging in the middle of May.

    Do you think my super-full hive could survive a second split? Then we'd only have to buy a queen, if I didn't get young enough eggs during the split.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    You need to give the new split 30 days to begin laying eggs. If you requeen before that, the bees may kill your new queen, since they know they have a queen just about ready to lay.

    Yes, the strong hive can afford to donate to another split. Just be sure you move eggs that have not become larva. "Has no royal jelly in the cell""

    Welcome to the forum.
     

  3. heinleinfan

    heinleinfan New Member

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    Thank you! I'll have to call the garden and see who wants to come out and watch us do the split!


    On the first split, I was going for 21 days, that's what I'd read on a couple sites when I went to find out about splitting. I can certainly wait 30 to order my queen though. But, I really think they may have one, they're *so* docile and don't have that non-queen buzzing. (We had a queenless hive for a while a couple years ago, and man, you could tell they weren't happy.)
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    21 is the minimum, counting the day of the split as day 3. 35 is the maximum.

    Yes, a queenless hive sounds more like a roaring rapids than a gentle waterfall.
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a 'really robust hive' many benefit (some might argue benefit the bee keeper) by taking a small split every month during the active season. this simply keeps the population in check and prevents swarming. for a lot of folks a heavy laying queen sounds like something everyone should want. typically these either swarm out early or starve to death at the first part of the winter. removing excess population kind of keeps both of these in check and give you some insurance when a hive dies (it will happen to every beekeeper) you have a replacement handy.

    ps.. at one time long ago I was also a fan of Heinlein. I did quite enjoy reading his books although at this time this old obsolete hard drive will not give any of them up :roll: .
     
  6. gunsmith

    gunsmith New Member

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    heinleinfan:

    First of all, welcome to the friendliest bee forum around. There are a lot of friendly folks here who are willing to share. Don't be afraid to ask questions. I too think Robert A. is one of the greatest authors of all time.
    As far as your question, IMO-go ahead and split again. Just do regular inspections to make sure you're queenright.