a very late season trap out

Discussion in 'Swarms, Cut outs, and Trap outs' started by Bhodi, Sep 13, 2009.

  1. Bhodi

    Bhodi New Member

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A nearby homeowner had a swarm move in 7 days ago. The first call he made was to an exterminator. The exterminator refused to spray unless a beekeeper said there was no way to get the bees out (ever hear of that before?). He is highly allergic to stings and wants the bees out now, dead or alive, but he and his wife would prefer to 'save' them if possible. They don't want to do a cut out and I think I was able to steer them away from spraying

    I realize it is way too late in the year to do a complete trap out, and I explained this to them, but they want to try it anyhow. No waiting till spring.

    It's a tough spot to access, and a tough spot to seal up, lots of ornate trimwork and uneven surfaces right at the opening.

    At the least I thought I could get some bees out of this to add to my nuc I'm tring to build up for the winter. That and some experience.

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    >>>>Any thoughts?<<<<


    Yes, but I doubt you want to hear them.

    I think your time is just as valuable as the next persons. I would tell them they could be taken out, but like the exterminator, there will be a charge. Price it for a spring removal or trap out, then tell them it will be 100 dollars more to do it now, since you will have to feed and care for them all winter. Also, if they wait until spring, it may be free, as they are quite likely to die over winter.
     

  3. Bhodi

    Bhodi New Member

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've seen your pictures of trap outs and cut outs and have found great success following your methods. I'd like to hear what ever you have to offer on this topic.



    ..and that brings me to my next thread topic...pricing.
     
  4. Bhodi

    Bhodi New Member

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This will be an incomplete job, I'm only going after as many foragers as possible not the stores inside the house, not looking for the bait hive to raise a queen. I'm going to use the bees I trap to combine with my nuc at home.

    Is there any time line, or something to look for, that tells me to remove the hive from the site?

    I'd like to get as many bees out as possible, but winter is coming soon and I want to get them home and combined, too.
     
  5. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So does that mean you are going to leave an unknown amount of honey in the wall without bees to protect it? Open to roaches, mice, ants, and other vermin? What are you going to tell the client when the honey starts seeping through the walls and dripping on the floor? 3 or 4 trails of ants across their living room floor, roaches dropping from the ceiling?

    I don't think I would leave a forwarding address if I were you.
     
  6. Bhodi

    Bhodi New Member

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I spent over an hour and a half with them explaning all I could to them, including some basic bee stuff, why they came, what they are doing now and how they overwinter. Also the dangers of leaving behind the honey: the fermenting, the possible mess, the pests, the future swarms coming...I explained cut out vs trap out vs leave them alone till spring. He's alergic and they both want them out now.

    They are both educated and intelligent: he's an engineer, she's a professor at a local university. They asked a lot of good questions and I feel I had the right answers for what they asked. I'm trying to help them the best I can.

    They made the choice to trap them out and to do it now. Not me. That was not my first choice for this time of year and I told them so.

    If there is a better way, please tell me! I'd rather do it right than leave the stores in the wall. What would you sugguest is the next step here?
     
  7. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Leave the entrance open.


    If they will allow it, Leave a hive near the entrance for 2 to 4 days, until the activity slows. If they won't allow it, you did the best you could. Hopefully, the neighborhood bees will be sufficient to do the clean up.
     
  8. Bhodi

    Bhodi New Member

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This would be a huge PITA, but could I bring my queenright nuc over, set it on the bait hive, combine that with the bait hive, and use that?
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Let the nuc BE the bait hive. Why use two boxes?
     
  10. Bhodi

    Bhodi New Member

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    The bees from the ferral colony will be accepted in the queenright hive when they can't get back "home"?
     
  11. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

    Messages:
    8,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  12. Bhodi

    Bhodi New Member

    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This is good to know. Even if I had know this from the start, I have my doubts about the homeowners letting me bring more bees into their yard.

    While this may not be a complete success, I knew that from the start and let the owners know as well, I have still learned a lot on this one. Thanks for your help, Iddee.
     
  13. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So what did you decide to do, don't leave us hanging.

    Seems to me like a cut out would have been the best way to go if you could have gotten to them.

    G3