? about splits

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Eddy Honey, Jul 20, 2011.

  1. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    I'm already thinking about next year.
    Two of my 3 hives reared their own queen, 1 through supercedure and the other lost their queen to a swarm (which I captured)
    All 3 hives have tremendous brood patterns with very full deep and medium frames full of brood on both sides. The captured swarm hive has even started using the bottom 3rd of the third box for brood.
    I'm thinking I may be able to do some splits next year.
    Can I just let the splits raise their own queen much like two of my hives did anyway? Give them some eggs to work with and leave them alone? Sure it set me back a little but these hives are cookin' now.

    Thanks,
    Ed
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Yes, it's called a walkaway split. Just make the split, allowing equal resources to both, with eggs in both. The one that doesn't have the queen will raise one. You can do it as early as you see drones flying.
     

  3. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Yes, most call that a walk away split.

    Better yet do one split and let them raise several queen cells, then do your splits on the others and add a queen cell from the first split.
     
  4. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    ^^Just cut out a section of comb with the queen cell on it? What do you use to stick it into the new split? A pin of some sort? Duct tape?
     
  5. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    duct tape :lol: :lol: still another use for the stuff!!

    Depends on how the cell is constructed and attached. A queen cup that has been pulled out into a cell might be easily cut off of the comb and attached with a long frame nail to the new comb. A cell that has been pulled out of a regular cell (emergency or supercedure cell) will take a little more diligence to cut a small area of comb around the cell, and then cut out a matching small area of comb on the new frame, think of swapping places with a puzzle piece.
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Eddy writes:
    The captured swarm hive has even started using the bottom 3rd of the third box for brood.

    tecumseh:
    if you know the history of this hive??? this I think would represent the best genetic stock for generating queens.... 1) she has some age on her and 2) she has by your own description been successful.

    for cutting out cells you generally need to start with frames of plain foundation (wired or not wired but not plastic). I don't do this much any more but when I did I simply cut out a good bit of wax and lodged them between the top bars or sometimes pressed them into the comb... up toward the top bar and somewhat centered on the cluster of the new split.
     
  7. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

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    ^^I got this queen in one of my 2 nucs. She was a great layer in her original hive and is continuing in the new, swarm hive. Her daughter seems to be following suit in the original hive with very nice brood patterns. But I agree, I would like her daughters to be the queens in my splits. This complicates things as I was leaning towards walk-away splits but now I want the genetics of that great queen.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    not really that much of a problem.
    1) all you need is one frame of green (unsealed) brood from the 'selected' queen in each nuc (walk away split) you might make up.
    or 2) remove the selected queen in the form of a nuc leaving green brood behind and harvest any cells from there.
     
  9. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Think of it this way- it sets them back a couple extra weeks to raise a new queen from an egg, but it sets the mites back a whole lot too- they have no where to lay their eggs for several weeks! :Dancing:
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Omie writes:
    Think of it this way- it sets them back a couple extra weeks to raise a new queen from an egg,

    tecumseh:
    this is really the pivotal concern in how you might 'optimally' wish to obtain queens. if your season is long the extra month of being queenless may have little end result (and the upside is this non brood laying period 'may' be somewhat effective in limiting varroa). if your season is extremely short you may want to go another path and reduce this non brood up period somewhat.