Acceptance of Young Queens

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Versipelis, Dec 7, 2014.

  1. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

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    P. 32 - 34 in the book, "Beekeeping at Buckfast Abbey" by Brother Adam, he address the introduction of new queens. What he had to say was quite contradictory to everything I thought I understood about introducing queens; namely, he denies that the colony has to get used to the new queens scent (pheromone) but that a successful queen introduction is a matter of the new queen's calm demeanor. He introduces his young queens to young bees in a Nuc, prior to introducing them to main colony. Some 80 years as a head beekeeper, I would imagine Brother Adam had a good understanding of what he's talking about; however, his book is a little dated (©1987)

    I ask because, I introduced two marked queens to my hives this past Summer (in a queen cage) and they were both replaced by the colonies.

    What methods do beekeepers employ to release young queens successfully ?
     
  2. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    If the old queen yet lives, the BEST way to introduce a new queen is to squash the old queen on the cage of the new queen.

    If she does not live, smearing comb and honey that smell of the hive on the cage helps a great deal.

    A queenless hive is the toughest, even if there are no queen larva in the hive, they often fail to accept a new queen and I would say start her in a nuc with nurse bees and capped brood (2 frames) from a successful calm hive, and when they have accepted her, shake out the queenless hive remnants in front of the nuc.

    Or in my last round, after 4 weeks with no brood, and they rejected the queen I'd bought them or she left, I simply let the queenless bunch live out the remainder of their lives in their hive but stole most of the stores and much comb for my other hives.
     

  3. camero7

    camero7 Member

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    Were they superseded or did the bees kill them?
     
  4. Versipelis

    Versipelis New Member

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    I don't know... My next hive inspection (a month later) I found unmarked queens.
     
  5. Gypsi

    Gypsi Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Then they were superseded. It happens