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Hey everyone I'm hoping one of u out there have purchased or know about a hive I'm thinking of getting from amazon. It is the Maybe brand beehive , with one deep and one super, including frames and foundations. It is the one that is currently $125.99. But here's my problem. I want to do a langstroth hive but this one does not say anything about it being a langstroth. Can I still add supers etc. When my hive grows? Or do I need to find a different hive that says langstroth? Also, do I need to start with one super and one deep, or more? Also, I do have a problem with this hives price. Is there one I can find somewhere else that is cheaper but good quality? It would be great if it was on amazon, and maybe some info on cheap yet good quality beekeeping necessities? This is my first rodeo with bees in the coming spring, so I am a total newbie. It doesn't help that I am 14 yrs old. Thanks in advance!!!
 

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There is so much cheap junk on Amazon you have to be very careful.
Also are those boxes waxed for long life?
Try Bee Castle or Hoover Hives would be my choice very little price difference and I can verify the quality on those two brands.

You will also need to specify 8 frame or 10 frame.
10 frame is most popular.

Start off with a single deep unlit you get 6 or 7 frames of bees, then you can add the medium.
 

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Personally I would not go “cheap” on hive boxes; find a store or online catalogue and buy from them and stay with the brand you buy, so boxes/supers all fit, are the same size.
 

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Hey everyone I'm hoping one of u out there have purchased or know about a hive I'm thinking of getting from amazon. It is the Maybe brand beehive , with one deep and one super, including frames and foundations. It is the one that is currently $125.99. But here's my problem. I want to do a langstroth hive but this one does not say anything about it being a langstroth. Can I still add supers etc. When my hive grows? Or do I need to find a different hive that says langstroth? Also, do I need to start with one super and one deep, or more? Also, I do have a problem with this hives price. Is there one I can find somewhere else that is cheaper but good quality? It would be great if it was on amazon, and maybe some info on cheap yet good quality beekeeping necessities? This is my first rodeo with bees in the coming spring, so I am a total newbie. It doesn't help that I am 14 yrs old. Thanks in advance!!!
HelloCatskill,
It's just my opinion, but I purchase all my equipment from the major dealers like Mann Lake, Dadant, etc. They offer quality products and free shipping on orders over $100. That's a plus when buying hives especially since they are heavy. As far as starting a hive, I suggest you start with one deep brood box and as that fills, add a second. Hives always need 2 deep brood boxes to sustain the hive. I also suggest purchasing an in hive feeder. It takes up two frames. You can easily fill it with sugar syrup and when the first brood box is full, move it up to the 2nd box. Add two new frames to the first brood box. Do not even consider adding a super the first year. Let the bees fill the frames with cells and brood. Keep feeding them and they will thrive. I like to have my hives off the ground on cinder blocks or some such platform facing east. This allows them to warm up early with the rising sun. I have my hives shaded in the west and south with trees which gives them protection from too much sun/heat. It also serves as a wind break in the winter. Read up on bee diseases, especially varroa and tracheal mites. You'll need to treat the hive to kill the mites otherwise your chances of losing the bees is quite great. Get involved with a local bee club. I have 2 her in Connecticut that I am affiliated with. They offer classes and demonstrations very often. The winter time is a great time to get your hive ready- built, painted, etc. Be sure to glue all joints and make sure that they are square and true. Plan your site and go to some classes. Do a lot of reading. That's important so that you learn as much as possible. You might even get to meet an 'old timer' who will take you under his/her wing and teach you the ropes. I was lucky...I had two who taught me a great deal. You'll love the hobby. Good luck and have fun. Raising bees is a very rewarding and interesting pastime.
 

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HelloCatskill,
It's just my opinion, but I purchase all my equipment from the major dealers like Mann Lake, Dadant, etc. They offer quality products and free shipping on orders over $100. That's a plus when buying hives especially since they are heavy. As far as starting a hive, I suggest you start with one deep brood box and as that fills, add a second. Hives always need 2 deep brood boxes to sustain the hive. I also suggest purchasing an in hive feeder. It takes up two frames. You can easily fill it with sugar syrup and when the first brood box is full, move it up to the 2nd box. Add two new frames to the first brood box. Do not even consider adding a super the first year. Let the bees fill the frames with cells and brood. Keep feeding them and they will thrive. I like to have my hives off the ground on cinder blocks or some such platform facing east. This allows them to warm up early with the rising sun. I have my hives shaded in the west and south with trees which gives them protection from too much sun/heat. It also serves as a wind break in the winter. Read up on bee diseases, especially varroa and tracheal mites. You'll need to treat the hive to kill the mites otherwise your chances of losing the bees is quite great. Get involved with a local bee club. I have 2 her in Connecticut that I am affiliated with. They offer classes and demonstrations very often. The winter time is a great time to get your hive ready- built, painted, etc. Be sure to glue all joints and make sure that they are square and true. Plan your site and go to some classes. Do a lot of reading. That's important so that you learn as much as possible. You might even get to meet an 'old timer' who will take you under his/her wing and teach you the ropes. I was lucky...I had two who taught me a great deal. You'll love the hobby. Good luck and have fun. Raising bees is a very rewarding and interesting pastime.
Hi Gypsi, the OP is Horselover, not me. Deb
 
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This is my first rodeo with bees in the coming spring, so I am a total newbie. It doesn't help that I am 14 yrs old. Thanks in advance!!!
Use your computer to find "Beekeepers in (your county name) County" and you should be able to find a group that you can join BEFORE you spend your hard earned cash! IF there are no beekeepers listed go to the Sheriff's office and ask what they do when people find swarms in their yards, houses, barns, etc.. Most Sheriff's offices will have some contact that they can call for removal. Get the name/names and contact those people to see if someone will MENTOR you.

You may even find a good "deal" on used equipment through those contacts. IF SO, grab it if your MENTOR has turned you on to it. That way, if you're not going to stay with the beekeeping you're not out so much money.

ALSO, use your computer to check for "Beekeeping Supplies" near ZIP - and type in your ZIP Code and you should find sources local to you where you can see the actual equipment. And read, read, read, BEFORE you actually get into beekeeping - and Winter is a good time to do that. Below is a GREAT Web Site with a ton of information all about beekeeping. This just so happens to be a Subscribed site, however, I think it would be worth it to you as you can access all of their old articles as well. Copy and paste the LINK below in your Browser and set the LINK as a Favorite so you can get back to it later - then BROWSE the site before laying down your money for a subscription.


HEY! GOOD LUCK TO YOU ON YOUR BEEKEEPING JOURNEY.
OH! You might want to check out horizontalhive.com too. However, those frames are larger than Langstroth frames. Some people are building their own Langstroth Horizontal Hives so those hold standard frames.
 

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The horizontal hive he speaks of with larger frames is a different style call a "Layens" Hive.
Layens frames are twice the size of a Langstroth. They are obviously different.
Both can be found at Horiz Hives.com

Most horizontal hives are Langstroth based and use standard frames.

There are a couple of downsides to Horizontal hives,
No place for supers, unless you take the lid off.
and you have to take the entire hive apart to check for queen cells (instead of just tipping up the box to see the bottom of the frames).
Feeding has to be done internally unless you build some kind of feeder into the box.

Most Horiz or Long type hives are custom made, make sure the builder has provided proper bee space (above below and on the sides),
Bee space between the top of the frames and top covers is critical for placement of pollen patties or mountain camp sugar, besides allowing the bees free access between the frames.
Make sure the follower board has a good seal (or bees will get lost and die behind it)
Also check that you will be able to employ a robber screen as that will likely be unique to that hive.
The other thing I would look for in a horizontal is insulation.
I built mine from 2" thick lumber for the sides and bottom and 2" of foam insulation in the lid above the inner covers.
A lid built light so it's not so heavy to open, a roof with overhang to keep rain off the box.
Another reason for thick lumber is the size of the box, thinner lumber will not keep it's shape as well as thick.

Note: the Bee Castle and Hoover Hives boxes while competitively priced, are very high quality.

Note: An on-line personality has recently reviewed Mann Lake boxes, he paid for top quality and was not satisfied with what he recieved.
He cited poor craftsmanship, that the box joints were not consistent and left gaps. Mann Lake has gotten too big for their britches it seems.
 
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