Adding queen to a hive

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Yankee11, Sep 12, 2012.

  1. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    What would be the prper way to introduce a mated queen to a hive that has been queenless for about a month?

    Thanks.
     
  2. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    yankee11....
    :lol:
    i thought it was me but you have this question posted twice in the forum?! that's alright you will get good coverage!:lol:

    what line is your mated queen, and what line of the bees are you introducing the mated queen to?

    i practice an indirect release method, and if your hive has been queenless for a month, i would not directly release a queen.....some may disagree.....but....:grin:
    i do not directly release my queens. (my queens are russian hybrids) i lay the cage on top of the frames and observe the bees reaction to her, are they welcoming her.....trying to touch her or attend to her with antennae? are they fanning her scent? a very good sign. if they are trying to sting her through the cage, not a good sign, but will tell you that indirect release is a good method to follow.

    i place the cage in candy side up between brood frames, i may leave the cork in overnight or for 24 hours before removing it if the bees have not been too receptive. i let the bees release her, this should occur within 3 days. i will not check for her release until the 4th day.

    hope this helps, best wishes on your queen release and post back!
     

  3. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Yea, I posted twice by accident, the first one didn't show up for a while so I thought I had messed it up. Then they both appeared. I don't know how to delete a post.

    anyway, Thanks.

    The reason I ask, is someone told me I would have to create a nuke with 2 frames of brood and 2 frames of honey. Leave the nuke queenless for a day and then add the queen to the nuke. Then after a week or so combine the nuke with the queenless hive. He said if I put the queen in the queenless hive they would kill her.

    Thats different than what I have read and seen. Thats why I am asking.
     
  4. mdunc

    mdunc New Member

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    I've never heard of going to all that trouble. I've always released my queens just as riverbee explained above. But.....they're others on here with way more experience than me so I'd wait for them to chime in. Either way though, I would think you need to be getting her in there.
     
  5. Marbees

    Marbees Member

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    What riverbee said, let bees release her.
    This summer I watched as friend released a new queen directly. Bees were forming a court around her fanning her scent when one bee came to sting her, so friend picked her and returned back to the cage. Two days later bees released her and she is still there.
     
  6. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    "The reason I ask, is someone told me I would have to create a nuke with 2 frames of brood and 2 frames of honey. Leave the nuke queenless for a day and then add the queen to the nuke. Then after a week or so combine the nuke with the queenless hive. He said if I put the queen in the queenless hive they would kill her."

    yankee, some beeks will use this method, and sometimes this method is used when the bees have been queenless for an extended period of time, are snarly, the line of bees/queens etc...

    if you directly release a queen into a hive that has been queenless for one month, you run the risk that the bees will most likely kill her. the indirect release method gives the bees time to accept her.

    hope this helps, what line of queen are you requeening with and what line of bees do you have?
     
  7. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Like riverbee said.If you go the nuc route your still going to have to introduce the queen by combining. With the hive being queenless fore a month the quicker they get a queen the better,you could end up with a laying worker? then you do have a problem.:eek: Jack
     
  8. ndm678

    ndm678 Member

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    Go with what Riverbee said. It's worked for me. I know some races aren't so receptive to different races of queen.
     
  9. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    If the hive has been queen less for a month there is most likely a laying worker in the hive that will fight for the honer or being monarch of the hive. it is like trying to release a queen into a queen rite hive. finding the laying workers Cause there could be more than one is very hard task. I assume you bought a queen and she is in a cage, the most sucsesfull way to introduce the queen would be to make a small nuc with bees and brood from a queen rite hive and introduce the queen to it. Once they realize they are queen-less they will except the new queen. After sh has been released and is laying introduce the bees to her by shaking the bees off the frames 20 ft away and let the bees fly back to the hive.
    1- move hive 20 fr away
    2- place queen and frames in center of super
    3- shake bees off frames and place frames on ether side of nuc
    this way the laying worker doesn't make it into the hive and the bees pick up the [FONT=&amp]pheromones[/FONT] of the new queen when entering the hive.
     
  10. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    It's a cutout we did in the spring. Do to my newness as a beekeepr I let them swarm. So they are ferrel bee's. The guy I can get a queen from sells Italians.

    I dont have a laying worker yet. In fact I had a new queen for a while during this last month but she dissappered after laying good bit of brood. Then they have raised another queen that has hatched out last weekend. So, I am now waiting to see
    some eggs. If I see some sign of a queen were good, if not I am going to buy a queen and introduce. I figure I give her until
    middle of next week. That would be 10 days or so after she hatches to start laying.

    If I get them a new queen and they kill her then that will be it. They will get combined with another hive. He sells queens for 15 bucks, so I think its worth a shot. Still very worm here and a good flow is going. All other queens laying like crazy. So I think I have time.
     
  11. riverbee

    riverbee Active Member

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    sounds like you have a great plan going yankee, give the new queen 10 days or so to start laying, hopefully she will. if she doesn't the 15 bucks for an italian queen is worth the investment, you have nothing to lose. good luck and let us know how you do :grin:
     
  12. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    In this case you could have introduced the queen before the new queen emerged by smoking them and direct releasing the queen on the top bars and letting her walk down the frame the bees were ready for and would be receptive to a new queen.
    the puzzling question to me would be, What happened to the new queen? Is there a problem with genetics? Was the queen effected by mites while developing? Did She get damaged during a hive inspection? This can be determined by counting back the days from when the new queen emerged and seeing if it correlates with a hive inspection or manipulation. In my own mind I would prefer knowing what happened to the queen even if I did it, rather than not knowing and have the same problem with the new queen. Good luck with her.
     
  13. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    Yes. I believe we probably did something during an inspection. Things were looking good. She was laying, we ad capped brood, eggs etc. Then a week later we had about 8 or 10 emergency cells drawn out.

    I've already bet myself up over that. :sad:

    This have has just gone through one bad thing over another, I am doing alll I can to make it right. It ctually has a lot of bee and foos stored so it's really worth saving. We'll see.

    But, wht you are saying about releasing her before a new queen emerges? If I don't see eggs in the next 5 or 6 days, I could add a frame of eggs and brood and if they draw out some queen cells I could add the queen at that time. Correct?
    If so, would she just open the queen cells and kill the new queens before they hatch.

    This may be option.
     
  14. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    a snip...
    I dont have a laying worker yet.

    tecumseh:
    if you do not have laying workers then I would suspect the hive has not been queenless for a month.
     
  15. Yankee11

    Yankee11 New Member

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    No. they had a queen for a short while and she disappeared and I added a rame of brood and eggs. They drew queen cells from that frame and those cells hatched last weekend. So I guess during the last month or so they have ben occupied trying to raise a new queen.