AFB contagion question

Discussion in 'Pests and Diseases' started by ziffa, Oct 10, 2011.

  1. ziffa

    ziffa New Member

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    Hullo! I need opinions on my level of paranoia! :)

    I recently visited a friend of my mum's who was having problems with his bees. Turns out he had a hive down with AFB. Yuck! And Aaggh! I cooked my hive tool when I got home, according to Iddee's instructions and washed my jacket in hot water with a little bleach. But I have a question about the only other piece of equipment I took over.

    I took my varoa board, thinking that would be his problem. I laid it on the ground about 5 feet from the hive in question. Because we quickly realized it was foulbrood, the board never got any closer than that. But now it is sitting outside my garage getting squirrely glances from me. I would sure hate to infect my hive! Just how contagious is this stuff?

    Iddee explained that all hives probably have some spores in them. My question is, if I wash and bleach the board, is it still usable? Or are those spores so hardy that I should just chuck the board? Was it even close enough to gather any? Invisible micro-spores freak me out!!

    What do you guys think? New boards aren't expensive, but I also hate to be wasteful. Thanks for your thoughts!

    love,
    ziffa
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Get rid of the paranoia and put your board away until it is needed. There's nothing wrong with it.

    PS. Thanks for coming into the forum. We've got a bunch of good folks here, in spite of me.
     

  3. ziffa

    ziffa New Member

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    in spite of you! I love you! :)

    Thanks Iddee, I'll wipe it off and put it up then.
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    if I had any concerns I would first take a plumber's torch and scorch everything. then I would set it out in the bright sunshine... uv is a real killer.
     
  5. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    yes UV is a killer--just ask your skin lol but then I seldom pay attention to what my skin says--explaining the sunburns I endure throughout the summer
     
  6. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

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    AHB spores do not just jump around. Bleach and sunlight do not kill them or even give them a bad day either. Your board is fine.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    Americanbeekeeper is quite correct here. uv will kill a lot of stuff but not afb.... the proper process would be to boil in lyewater for killing afb spores.
     
  8. barry42001

    barry42001 New Member

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    viewtopic.php?f=13&t=1210
    this will provide you will useful matter regarding afb and efd
    merely laying your bottom board won't do it, but you could transfer spores from the infected colony with your tools and clothing ( gloves, hands ) though not likely is possible therefore taking reasonable care is needed once the situation is apparent. Lye water and scortching with a torch are common techniques, but not fool proof, using a gas chamber described in the above stated post is considered as close to foolproof as you'll get but is expensive and few are available. with all that said it is highly unlikely you have alot to worry about, afb bacilli are found in most hives to one degree or another, a triggering event that caused the colony to be stressed and immunilogical levels to drop a bit allows the afb or efb to take off no one is truely certian what those stressors are.
    Barry
     
  9. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Irradiation is the only know way to to positively get rid of the spores, it is not too cheap and very few of the chambers are around.

    I would not worry about the bottom board myself, but do clean your hive tool and wash your clothing, especially your gloves if you wore them.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    G3 writes;
    Irradiation is the only know way to to positively get rid of the spores, it is not too cheap and very few of the chambers are around.

    tecumseh:
    them lucky ducky up Carolina way have one. perhaps we all could have one if Iddee would tell us who's arm needed to be twisted to obtain one? :oops:

    current lab stuff (done in regards to the national health survey of the honeybee here in the USofA) suggest that there is just not all that much afb around. I suspect there is but the current genetic make up of the bees is such that it doesn't really represent that much of a problem. If you did have a case of afb then you kind of won/lost the genetic lottery. Do remember what you saw since you may not see another case in another 20 years.
     
  11. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Seen it, smelled it, had to deal with it. Death and cleansing by fire......sad way but has to be done.