After a swarm?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by Gator_56, Mar 27, 2014.

  1. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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    My one hive just swarmed last Friday. I read ankle to catch the swarm rehive it in a new hive and they are doing great so far.

    How long week it be before the swarm cells in my original hive hatch?

    The reason I ask, I was thinking about taking a frame that had Sam cells on it and starting a nuc.

    Is this advisable and what suggestions do you have?
     
  2. Gator_56

    Gator_56 New Member

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  3. Barbarian

    Barbarian New Member

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    I think it is going to be a little late to do some manipulations with your original hive.

    A swarm usually leaves after new Q cells have been sealed. A new Q will emerge about a week after the cell is sealed. You should have new virgin in your hive which should have done the rounds killing off her sisters.

    The new virgin will mature, go out on orientation and mating flights. Once mated you will have to wait for her to start laying. If the hive is strong it may take a while for her to begin laying. There are some manipulations you can do to speed the laying.
     
  4. Ray

    Ray Member

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    If the swarm was a BIG one you could possibly split it. You also need to watch out for virgins swarms.
    I would look in the old hive and see how many queen cells you have and how many of them are sealed.
    If there are a lot of nurse bees in the old hive you might want to split them into nucs.
    Check Micheal Bush's website:
    www.bushfarms.com
     
  5. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    not so long (1 or 2 days) after the swarm issued the new queen will emerge from her cell. in this kind of situation doing anything after the fact (unless done almost immediately) is likely too little and too late. < multiple queen cells can be taken advantage of if you do this immediately but even a little after the fact you do run the risk of upsetting a hive with only virgins and then you face the real risk that any disturbance effectively eliminates these by the workers murdering the virgins.... with all this carnage created via the bee keepers mucking about.