After-(artificial)swarming?

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by d.magnitude, Jun 15, 2011.

  1. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    A little over a week ago, I found one of my hives beginning swarm preparations. This is one of my first all-medium hives, and I underestimated how fast they'd fill those smaller boxes. When I looked in, I found a couple of swarm cells, one capped and one uncapped, and the original queen was still running around. I made an artificial swarm by moving the old queen and a few frames to a nuc box, and replaced them in the hive w/ foundation to make some more space. Sound like the right procedure?

    Today I looked in that hive and found 5-6 swarm cells, still capped. Upon looking a little more, I saw what I believe was a virgin queen. She was a bit smaller than a "regular" queen and was more yellow than the Carni/Russian queen I had in there earlier. Also, she was moving around slowly and deliberately (I thought new queens were skittish?). I saw no young brood in the hive, but still plenty of capped brood.

    Do you think this hive is about to throw off an after-swarm, or has the new young queen just not gotten around to destroying her rivals yet? I don't want to muck around in there more than neccesarry, but I'd like to capture any inevitable swarms if possible through making splits like before.

    Thanks for any advice,
    -Dan
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    d.magnitude writes:
    Sound like the right procedure?

    tecumseh:
    that is how I generally do it.

    I suspect the newly emerged virgin queen has just not murdered her potential rivals yet and yes a virgin queen is somewhat smaller than a mated queen since her abdomen is not swollen yet. when an unemerged queens get to a certain level of maturity and begin moving (turning I am told) in their cells is usually what signals the first emerged queen to do her murderous deed(s).
     

  3. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    Quick update.
    After 7 days, I looked in this hive again. The other swarm cells are open and empty. I saw that queen running around again, and she looked the same to me. Rather yellow, short (virgin-looking to my eyes).

    I just checked a "queen calender" I have, which says it can take a queen 7-8 days from hatching before it is mated and laying eggs. Now, it's entirely possible that there were a few eggs in there and I didn't see them, but I didn't, and she didn't look like a laying queen to me anyway.

    I guess my question is this: When should I expect a queen to start looking good and plump? Before she's laying? After she's been at it for a while?

    Thanks, Dan
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Three weeks after emerging.
     
  5. d.magnitude

    d.magnitude New Member

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    Ok, that's much later than I expected to see a change in appearance. I won't give up on her as a dud yet.

    -Dan
     
  6. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    with swarm cells of course you have no way of knowing the exact date. with cells of known age I think a minimum number is about 16 days after hatching to expect to see the first signs (eggs) of the new queen.
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    After the queen hatches on day 5 to 6 she will be sexually mature and strong enough to take her mating flights.

    After the mating flight (and of course this is all dependent on her getting mated) it will be another 10 to 15 days before you will see eggs.
     
  8. ScoobyDoBee

    ScoobyDoBee New Member

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    So...21 days to a queen from egg, 5+ days to maturity, another 10+ to eggs.... So, from egg to queen to new eggs, it's a minimum of 36 days, is that correct?
     
  9. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    16 days from egg to queen.
    35 days maximum from egg to laying queen.
    She emerges on day 16 and can start laying on day 21 or anytime up to day 35. If not by then, she will likely never lay, or at least not be a good queen.
     
  10. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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  11. ScoobyDoBee

    ScoobyDoBee New Member

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    OMG, LOVE THAT! :Dancing: Thank you, that's GREAT!!!
     
  12. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    That queen calender is great! What will the digital world of programming think up next?
     
  13. ScoobyDoBee

    ScoobyDoBee New Member

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    Thanks again, iddee. Just saw your post. Makes it so much easier to understand when it is laid out like that!