after treatment for mites the one hive looks like this

Discussion in 'Beekeeping 101' started by adamant, Aug 9, 2012.

  1. adamant

    adamant Member

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    [​IMG]
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    been like this for 3 days.
    normal
     
  2. pturley

    pturley New Member

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    What did you treat them with?
     

  3. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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    What treatment did you use that gt them so upset?
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    My money is on Formic acid! :mrgreen:
     
  5. adamant

    adamant Member

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    maqs................
     
  6. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Poor bees! :cry: I wonder where the queen is, she must be effected somehow.
     
  7. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

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    Wowzer! That one looks like the hive is inside out...
     
  8. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    MAQS = Formic acid.
    Same reaction using the Mite Away Quick Strips as the old Mite Away II Pads. For the first day or so it drives a lot of the bees out the fumes are so powerful. They do eventually go back inside after it "airs out" a bit.
    The fumes at times can be so powerful that it may obscure the queens pheromones resulting in supercedure and sometimes a loss of a small amount of brood. Takes care of Varroa and Tracheal mites at the same time and can be used during a flow.
    Queen loss is something that I heard back when the pads were being used. I was wondering how folks were doing that have used the Quick Strips.
     
  9. Omie

    Omie New Member

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    Perry, I thought it was the new 'quick strips' that were causing some people to lose their queens.

    Why would it be not safe to apply the MiteawayII formic acid PADS during honey production, but be safe to apply the Miteaway formic acid Quick Strips during honey production? Same ingredient, both apparently quite strong, or strong enough to kill mites and distress the bees. Doesn't make much sense to me. The manufacturer never really explains why/how it's ok for one and not the other. I want to know the details of such things.

    Either way, I'd not want to eat honey that was exposed to formic acid fumes of this strength. As many folks like to point out, formic acid can be found naturally (in minute quantities) in honey, in bees, and in ants.... but at this toxic mite-killing level of concentration it's just not 'natural' at all, in my book. I don't give a hoot how 'safe' or 'natural' anyone says it is... especially if stated the manufacturer or dealer.
    Just my own personal view, take it or leave it as you like! :)
     
  10. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    Quick question did you treat all the hives shown on the stand? What temperature is it Daily high in your area? and did you pull honey supers off of the hive before you treated?
     
  11. adamant

    adamant Member

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    all were treated the sametime and the temp that day was 91 and with a cool front the following few days after
     
  12. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    A couple of things:

    I notice what appears to be entrance reducers. Are those screened bottom boards? I had assumed you only treated the one hive. :oops:
    I was under the impression using MAQS that all entrances were to be closed except the bottom which is to be left completely open during application and treatment. If those are screened bottoms, are the trays in place?

    Apis: I don't believe that you have to remove honey supers during treatment with MAQS.

    Omie: That is a fair and valid question you ask. Why formic can be used with super on during application with this method and not with the old MiteAway II pads (or any other form of application with formic for that matter) is a mystery to me as well.
     
  13. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

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  14. ApisBees

    ApisBees Active Member

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    How do the bees look today?
    The reason for having the hive knocked down to the brood supers is to have a more controlled environment for the treatment to work and ease of application. applied on top brood chamber formic is heaver than air so drifts downwards, the amount of formic vaporization in relation to the area in the hive changes when you have honey supers on. so the treatment could be less effective. Bees hanging out in the top honey supers may not be treated enough to kill the mites on them.
     
  15. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

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    Formic acid has been around and used by beekeepers for a long time. It is only lately through the introduction of MiteAway II, and now MAQS that it has become more "mainstream".
    The original (and probably still cheapest, a gallon goes a long way) way to use it was squirting a measured amount on paper towel or those meat pads. It required several trips (I think every 5 days) for a treatment regimen to be successful. It was also highly weather dependent. That seems to be why the NOD creation caught on so well. The added benefit of formic is that it combats both mites.
    Would I drink it? No, but I can say that about a lot of things.
    I think if handled properly it can be utilized as another tool in your IPM strategy toolbox. (or not) :wink: