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Down here in southern Australia, all spring blossoms got rained out, all sprummer it rained.. just started summer and my mini meadow is starting to flower and 10/ 11 days it has rained/ hailed and too cold and and wet to forage :cry:. poppies finishing, thyme on the home run. Still the salvias nepetas forget me nots and linaria will go until autumn and it looks very pretty right now. ah well if it's not drought it's flood. such is life. Hows winter up in the cold north? Are anyone's bees still out and flying?

Flower Plant Purple Natural landscape Terrestrial plant
 

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Here in Ohio,it is just at the start of Winter but so far,no snow on the ground and we do get the occasional warm day for the bees to do a cleansing flight. Checked on my 7 hives and one hive isn't showing to much life on a warm enough day but I did see a yellow jacket sneak in at the top entrance of the sugar board. I hate that but no good now to look inside with temps in the mid 30"s "F".
You have awesome flowers .
 

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Mine have been out and flying a little but not much. I should harvest some honey, they have way more than a Texas winter requires probably. Might have to get a friend to help me in a day or 2. Or maybe not. I hate to crack the box seals before a cold front and we have one finally coming this weekend
 

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Down here in southern Australia, all spring blossoms got rained out, all sprummer it rained.. just started summer and my mini meadow is starting to flower and 10/ 11 days it has rained/ hailed and too cold and and wet to forage :cry:. poppies finishing, thyme on the home run. Still the salvias nepetas forget me nots and linaria will go until autumn and it looks very pretty right now. ah well if it's not drought it's flood. such is life. Hows winter up in the cold north? Are anyone's bees still out and flying?
I had to laugh at your "All flowered up" comment! Two Springs back I tilled out a 3 ft. wide by 40 ft. long "flower bed" about 40-50 ft in front of the hives and put a fortune into perennial seeds. Had a great first year of flowers and all summer long checked for my bees buzzing around in them. A very, very few bees but many, many butterflies feeding. This last Spring I reseeded and got a very large supply of Fox Tail growing and a few butterflies and NO BEES!! Grrr! So, dumb me is doing this for a 3rd year to see what will happen. The bed is all ready waiting for the seeds again.

This year I did pull 3 supers, 30 med. frames and extracted 43 lbs of honey, so I'm proud that the bees are out in the world working away. I have only 2 hives which is plenty and I do NOT sell the honey extruded but give as gifts to family and very close friends.
 

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I had to laugh at your "All flowered up" comment! Two Springs back I tilled out a 3 ft. wide by 40 ft. long "flower bed" about 40-50 ft in front of the hives and put a fortune into perennial seeds. Had a great first year of flowers and all summer long checked for my bees buzzing around in them. A very, very few bees but many, many butterflies feeding. This last Spring I reseeded and got a very large supply of Fox Tail growing and a few butterflies and NO BEES!! Grrr! So, dumb me is doing this for a 3rd year to see what will happen. The bed is all ready waiting for the seeds again.

This year I did pull 3 supers, 30 med. frames and extracted 43 lbs of honey, so I'm proud that the bees are out in the world working away. I have only 2 hives which is plenty and I do NOT sell the honey extruded but give as gifts to family and very close friends.
so when I bought my first hive I planted wildflower seed, lots of it. and I did see bees in it. And when I saw the blue bee I called the gal I bought the hive from and told her I seemed to have defective bees. (I obviously lacked time for research before I bought bees). She laughed, told me it was a mason bee. I still plant a lot of wildflowers. However honeybees love Texas sage, all the salvias, and borage, they really love borage, and horse mint also known as wild bergamot. Seeds are cheap, about to order some. Blooming shrubs and trees such as peach, pear, redbud are also very popular.
 

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I had to laugh at your "All flowered up" comment! Two Springs back I tilled out a 3 ft. wide by 40 ft. long "flower bed" about 40-50 ft in front of the hives and put a fortune into perennial seeds. Had a great first year of flowers and all summer long checked for my bees buzzing around in them. A very, very few bees but many, many butterflies feeding. This last Spring I reseeded and got a very large supply of Fox Tail growing and a few butterflies and NO BEES!! Grrr! So, dumb me is doing this for a 3rd year to see what will happen. The bed is all ready waiting for the seeds again.

This year I did pull 3 supers, 30 med. frames and extracted 43 lbs of honey, so I'm proud that the bees are out in the world working away. I have only 2 hives which is plenty and I do NOT sell the honey extruded but give as gifts to family and very close friends.
Nice work! I don't know about your part of the world, but not every year is always a bumper forage year so don't give away too much. We've had bugger all flowering here for the last 2 years and i had to buy honey frombeekeepers in more temperate climates ( you know, places with sunshine ;) )
Here in Ohio,it is just at the start of Winter but so far,no snow on the ground and we do get the occasional warm day for the bees to do a cleansing flight. Checked on my 7 hives and one hive isn't showing to much life on a warm enough day but I did see a yellow jacket sneak in at the top entrance of the sugar board. I hate that but no good now to look inside with temps in the mid 30"s "F".
You have awesome flowers .
I don't know if it would do it in snow, or your climate but here I have 3 winter flowerers to justify energy expenditure on cleasning flights. the camelias, rosemary, and Mahonia nepaulenis or sp. Because we get some still, cold, days in winter ( more rain in spring) the bees can come out and I've seen them foraging at 6 deg C at 3- 10 metres from he hive. Hope no more meanie yellow jackets bothering your girls.
 

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I had to laugh at your "All flowered up" comment! Two Springs back I tilled out a 3 ft. wide by 40 ft. long "flower bed" about 40-50 ft in front of the hives and put a fortune into perennial seeds. Had a great first year of flowers and all summer long checked for my bees buzzing around in them. A very, very few bees but many, many butterflies feeding. This last Spring I reseeded and got a very large supply of Fox Tail growing and a few butterflies and NO BEES!! Grrr! So, dumb me is doing this for a 3rd year to see what will happen. The bed is all ready waiting for the seeds again.

This year I did pull 3 supers, 30 med. frames and extracted 43 lbs of honey, so I'm proud that the bees are out in the world working away. I have only 2 hives which is plenty and I do NOT sell the honey extruded but give as gifts to family and very close friends.
Nice work! I don't know about your part of the world, but not every year is always a bumper forage year so don't give away too much. We've had bugger all flowering here for the last 2 years and i had to buy honey frombeekeepers in more temperate climates ( you know, places with sunshine ;) )

Yeah I look at a lot of those 'wildflower mixes' or 'bee flower' mixes or even 'chicken feed' seed mix and usually disagree with species mix and therefore buy my own seeds and do my own. Honey bees not native to this continent, so whilst I plant natives for the birds and reptiles, I use foreign plants whose genes express different amino acid profiles in pollen ( higher protein). So many of the meadow mixes have plants that flower at different times ( good flowering season is forag-able weather), or can mix annuals with perennials etc. Some of the chook mix plants can be ready to eat in six weeks whereas other species have to grow all season before producing and would not stand a mid growth cycle ravage by the chickens. So many sound great on paper but are crap in reality. Between observation ( your best resource) and sharing knowledge there's a lot of info around about species preference depending on what you want to attract. My plant choices in my mini meadow aren't exotic or exciting, but were chosen because they are known bee magnets and flower not stop from early summer till frost. Designing your own mix you can also choose plants whose flowering time agrees with your foraging period. Eg, spring is a write off for my bees as it's usually about 25 days out of 30 rain. I'm a time poor, lazy gardener so have not -too- weedy self seeders (sprummer flowering forget- me- nots, poppies, crimson clover, centaurea) alliums, thyme ( also sprummer) .mixed with summer flowering perennials ( salvia, nepeta (cat mint), Linaria purpurea).

And even though i knew it would be good, I am repeatedly amazed at it and gratified that I planted it. As said, it will flower when local forest is not ( and there's little gardening around here). I knew one garden cannot feed a hive of bees but witnessing the non stop dawn to dusk, very loud, extremely busy, crazy activity level ( now the rain has finally stopped) I'm revising the absolute truth of this statement. At my previous local bee club meeting once again everyone's' bees are looking bad, pest & disease and being fed sugar syrup and pollen patties etc. As it is said, the closest bees get the lions share, so my bees are rocking in the floral world, and catching up like crazy, and thriving. Four days of warm weather and i just put on a super, the bottom two deeps were absolutely packed out with brood, pollen and uncured nectar. I don't feed my bees, I want to encourage genetic adaption to local resources; foremost I'm more interested in healthy bees. I've got other gardens with other nectar and pollen but the meadow carries a lot of weight. I'll be interested to hear how your spring meadow goes. Good luck all getting through winter.

Here in Ohio,it is just at the start of Winter but so far,no snow on the ground and we do get the occasional warm day for the bees to do a cleansing flight. Checked on my 7 hives and one hive isn't showing to much life on a warm enough day but I did see a yellow jacket sneak in at the top entrance of the sugar board. I hate that but no good now to look inside with temps in the mid 30"s "F".
You have awesome flowers .
I don't know if it would do it in snow, or your climate but here I have 3 winter flowerers to justify energy expenditure on cleasning flights. the camelias, rosemary, and Mahonia nepaulenis or sp. Because we get some still, cold, days in winter ( more rain in spring) the bees can come out and I've seen them foraging at 6 deg C at 3- 10 metres from he hive. Hope no more meanie yellow jackets bothering your girls.

Yeah I look at a lot of those 'wildflower mixes' or 'bee flower' mixes or even 'chicken feed' seed mix and usually disagree with ingredients and therefore buy my own seeds and do my own. Honey bees not native to this continent, so whilst I plant natives for the birds and reptiles, I use foreign plants whose genes express different amino acid profiles in pollen ( higher protein). So many of the meadow mixes have plants that flower at different times ( good flowering season is forag-able weather), or can mix annuals with perennials etc. Some of the chook mix plants can be ready to eat in six weeks whereas other species have to grow all season before producing and would not stand a mid growth cycle ravage by the chickens. So many sound great on paper but are crap in reality. Between observation and sharing knowledge there's a lot of info around about species preference depending on what you want to attract. My plant choices in my mini meadow aren't exotic or exciting, but were chosen because they are known bee magnets and flower not stop from early summer till frost
 

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Nice work! I don't know about your part of the world, but not every year is always a bumper forage year so don't give away too much. We've had bugger all flowering here for the last 2 years and i had to buy honey frombeekeepers in more temperate climates ( you know, places with sunshine ;) )

I don't know if it would do it in snow, or your climate but here I have 3 winter flowerers to justify energy expenditure on cleasning flights. the camelias, rosemary, and Mahonia nepaulenis or sp. Because we get some still, cold, days in winter ( more rain in spring) the bees can come out and I've seen them foraging at 6 deg C at 3- 10 metres from he hive. Hope no more meanie yellow jackets bothering your girls.
Camelias here have to hide in the greenhouse in winter. and my rosemary well it's kind of brown right now, that last freeze hurt it, but I see green leaves starting to send out their tips... You must have warm winters. BTW you inspired me - I did give my bees a jar of sugar water to get them going last march, and one after I robbed them, but the only thing I really feed anymore is pollen sub, because our period of anything to feed on is so short I need a fast and early buildup. Also keeps them out of the chicken feed. once elm or oak actually opens blooms I'm done feeding.
 
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