Almost made a boo boo

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Monie, May 30, 2010.

  1. Monie

    Monie New Member

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    I've been keeping an eye on the hive that I have in my backyard, from the trapout. I had a rough guestimate of when the queen cell was capped. I figured I had between today and the day after tomorrow, before the queen emerged. I needed to make nucs, so i could split, and I wanted to use the 3 other cells on that frame. Something told me to go look today, and lucky I did!! When I popped the top and pulled the frame she was on I could see her little head emerging! HOLY CATS! I didn't have a knife with me so I used the edge of my tool to cut out the other cells! I don't think I could have cut that any closer! OH! Then, miss thing kind of runs and jumps onto my shirt! OH CRAP! PLEASE DON'T FALL! :beg: I quickly put the frame against my stomach and she runs back to it, and runs to the other side of the frame. Whew! Of course, I quickly put the frame back! She's a pretty thing. Light color phase, out of the Carni hive.

    Question: Will a queen from a cell taken from a totally different hive, breed with drones from the hive she's in?
     
  2. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    She will likely fly too far away for them to find her.
     

  3. wfuavenger

    wfuavenger New Member

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    +1 on iddee

    Drones fly about 1-2 miles max, queens fly a little farther to mate to keep from inbreeding.....
     
  4. Tia

    Tia New Member

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    Now there is something I did not know! I was wondering how inbreeding was avoided since I let my hives raise their own queens rather than buying from other sources. Those little queenies are smart, no?
     
  5. brooksbeefarm

    brooksbeefarm New Member

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    Ok,i read this and i have never heard it before.( i think on another fourm?) That Drones from different hives can fly in and out of hives other than their own without being attacked :confused: . This couldn't be right could it??? Jack
     
  6. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    Yes, it is correct. Drones are accepted and fed in any hive they go to during mating season. That is the number one way mites get from one hive to another.
     
  7. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I am not certain??? of the content or gist of some of the message here.

    Rather than comment on certain questionable comments just let me say that nature has wayS of limiting inbreeding.... the primary mechanism for mother nature to avoid this problem in regards to honeybees is drone congestion areas. The books are vague on the why of drone congestion areas, although it does appear they are used season after season after season.

    Inbreeding can be a very useful tool in 'human imposed' queen rearing schemes... i.e. to increase the frequency of a desire trait (the downside is those individual become more fragile and or difficult to maintain due primarily to the misalignment of sex alleles). almost anyone can somewhat monitor inbreeding in their hives (or apiary) by noting the number of missed cells in a solid frame of capped worker brood. if the number of missed cells become too large then generally this suggest that you are witnessing identical sex alleles lining up and the suggestion than inbreeding is becoming a problem in your bee yard.