Aloha from Molokai

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Dakine, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Aloha. Just signed up. I didsome bee keeping 25 years ago when I lived on Kauai. I moved here to Molokai 20 years ago and didn't do anything with bees until a swarm got in the wall in my garage a couple years ago.
    I just decided to get some equipment and try to put the hive in boxes. I ordered a suit and a smoker and just am making some boxes. I made [2] 9 5/8" Langworth style supers so far. I have to order frames and foundations.
    Shipping to Hawaii is always a problem. US Parcel Post take OVER 2 months.
    I don't have ANY idea who GOOD suppliers are?
    My first question of many to follow is:
    Hopefully I'll get the queen with the brood. I've taken a LOT of wild hives when I lived on Kauai. Mostly from hollow trees and some from walls..
    Is it better to start with 1 deep super and a medium/shallow [5 11/16 or 6 5/8] on top it or what?
    I have 2 deep boxes [9 5/8] now but I can cut them down smaller if it's better.
    I was planning to put the brood in frames in the deep one with a medium 5 11/16 on top.
    Should I buy a queen before tearing things apart and trying to transfer the hive?
    Aloha and Mahalo!
     
  2. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    First of all, Welcome to the forum. :hi:
    Your first post gets down to a lot of "meaty" issues.
    There are a lot of different opinions about the size of supers to use and a lot of them have been discussed on the forum. My personal preference is for deeps ONLY. That makes for total interchangeability--if you're up to handling their weight when full. In the long run, being able to exchange a frame from an upper super with one in a lower brood box can be a great advantage.
    Probably, not only shipping time is long, but also costly. Why not make the equipment yourself, or get a local carpenter to do the job for you. You'd very likely end up saving both time and money. It's really not that difficult.
    Follow the threads in the forum about trap-outs and cut-outs. They'll also link you to a lot of good videos on the subjects and then you can decide about whether or not in your instance you should buy a queen to start off.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    a big HOWDY from Texas.

    not so totally unassociated with you first post... prior to doing any cut out I would suggest you highly investigate the small hive beetle. you may decide you want to deal with any feral hive as a package and discard all the older wax. it has been reported to me (via several excellent sources) that this pest which is newly introduced is reeking havoc on existing mature colonies so any 'cut outs' will become a large draw for these pest.

    ps .... out there somewhere in this virtual reality is a video by 'fatbeeman' in regards to a simple trap he employs. this simple device seems to work and there should be an old thread here that will lead you to fatbeeman's web site and video(s).
     
  4. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Welcome to our friendly part of the beekeeping community.
    Hawaii, and your first three responses come from Texas, Israel and Canada, we truly are an International Beekeeping Community! :lol:
    Your will find plenty of helpful advice and answers to most of your questions here, this is a helpful bunch. :grin:
    If you are going to attempt a cut-out I wouldn't bother with buying a queen, first see if you get her during the cut-out. I am like Efmesch, I use 2 deeps for brood chamber, but then I am much further north than you so it may be more of a regional thing as to how you wish to approach it.
    If you are doing a trap-out and you do not have a frame with eggs that you can beg/borrow, you may wish to introduce a purchased queen to your trap-out.
     
  5. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    welcome to the forum. Glad to see you found us. I would recommend breaking your thread down and posting the different questions in the beekeeping thread forum. You have some interesting questions. You will get several answers here but a lot more on the beekeeping thread. Again welcome aboard glad to have you:thumbsup:
     
  6. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thats what makes us special. And a with a broader range of knowlege.:thumbsup:
    :Dancing:
     
  7. Marbees

    Marbees Member

    Messages:
    983
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Welcome to the forum:hi:
     
  8. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Welcome to the forum :wave:

    Is there not a local beekeeping supply place on the Islands, I would surely think some one there is making wooden ware, if not could be a good side line to get into.

    As far as box size, that is totally up to you, the bees do not care. I run deeps and shallows myself.

    When doing your cut out just be sure to keep the comb oriented in the same direction as you cut it out, top of the comb up. Rubber band the comb in your frames and good to go. Don't try to rubber band honey comb in the frames, it will usually break down and make a mess drowning many bees.

    There should be a queen in this hive and try to find her to transfer over to your hive. If you are having a hard time locating her leave a small piece of comb (about the size of your hand or smaller) at the top of the cut out, leave them alone for 15 to 30 minutes and more than likely she will come back to it if you have not already got her on some brood comb.

    If you are handy with the saw (which it sounds like you are) you could make a bee vac to help with the crowd control. There a several different designs that work pretty good.

    Anyway good luck with it and keep us posted of how it goes, or ask more questions if you have them!! No need to be shy around us :lol:

    Aloha
     
  9. vermillion

    vermillion New Member

    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Dakine, aloha from Papaikou on the Big Island!

    Welcome, I am new to this forum too, but have spent some time on the other forums and taken some classes here in Hilo. I work with a mentor in the Puna area.

    I dont know if you know that we have a state apiarist here now. She is awesome and here to specifically help us with the mites and small hive beetles, which have been found on Molokai now :-(.

    She visits all the islands doing outreach, and will make site visits if you need help. She helped someone do a swarm retrieval last week at Sack n Save!. She will literally suit up and come to wherever she is needed if possible. And, as she said in our class, she is only there for the bees, she doesnt care about unpermited structures or what else people may be doing or growing. She is working on a registration of beekeepers, and some of us here are in the beginning stages of figuring out how to do a bulk order of equipment....if you are on her mailing list you can get updated if we get that going.

    Here is her contact information:


    Danielle DowneyApiculture SpecialistHawaii Department of Agriculture/UH Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit16 E. Lanikaula St.Hilo, HI 96720808 936 5483ddowney@hawaii.eduThere isnt anyone selling equipment in the islands, though occasionally BEI carries a few things. I got two screened bottom boards from them, Dadant made them. Their stocks are really random. I dont know if they can bring in other things.I know from class there is one registered beekeeper on Molokai, I dont know more than that, but you could email danielle. She might be able to hook you up.Have you seen this?http://host.padzeo.com/demowp/?p=202Good luck to you!
     
  10. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hello Vermillion: :hi:

    I see you have just joined so I would like to welcome you to the forum as well. Feel free to introduce yourself if you wish.
    Also, thanks for offering the information to Dakine, I am sure it will be of great interest and value. :thumbsup:
     
  11. riverrat

    riverrat New Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Lets see we have the tundra division, the middle east division, and now looks like we have the beginings of an islands division this is great:Dancing:
     
  12. Dakine

    Dakine New Member

    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I tryed to purchase some queens from Kona Queens over your way. They can't ship to Molokai because you guys have the Varroa beee mite on the big island. I imagine we have them here also.
     
  13. crackerbee

    crackerbee New Member

    Messages:
    554
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Welcome to the forum and aloha Dakine

    [​IMG]
     
  14. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

    Messages:
    2,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Welcome to the forum!
     
  15. vermillion

    vermillion New Member

    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Aloha!

    You know, I think you dont have the mites yet. Which is great! I also think Kauai does not have them. that class was a while ago though...:wink:

    If you need queens, maybe get in touch with Danielle and she might be able to hook you up with someone on Molokai. I remember that there was one beekeeper registered there which means she has an email or phone contact. I imagine there are queen cells underway since that seems to be happening a lot right now.

    I cant say enough about how nice she is and how willing to help beekeepers and bees. She even has an assistant, named Lauren. I am sure if there is anything she can do to help, she will. Lots of aloha there!

    I dont know if you have considered top bar hives, but its an inexpensive alternative if you are interested in going that route. We work two of them at the beeyard and I am more comfortable with frames at this point but I definitely see the appeal and of course the fact that you can build your own is great.

    Good luck!
     
  16. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

    Messages:
    1,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Welcome Dakine! You really do not want two supers initially. The general rule is do not add a super until the bees have filled all they have with brood or food to 70 or 80 percent.
     
  17. Indiana Dave

    Indiana Dave New Member

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Welcome to the forum!!!