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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I attended a local bee club meeting last night. There was a heated "discussion" regarding controlling AFB. One person felt that a solution of 10% bleach water would kill AFB spores, while another felt bleach at any strength would be ineffective. Neither party backed down from their argument and I think some of us left the meeting rather confused. Does anyone have any thoughts on this subject?
 

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In order to keep it heated, the one who says the bleach will kill it is totally off his rocker. He needs to go back to beekeeping 101.
 

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Iddee said:
In order to keep it heated, the one who says the bleach will kill it is totally off his rocker. He needs to go back to beekeeping 101.
Unless he was talking about boiling equipment in that solution. Doing so in Lye water used to be a way of keeping equipment usable, rather than burning it.
 

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I think??? lye is quite a different chemical than bleach??? yes, no, huh?

I would think sqkcrk could add some more detail, but it seems to me the caustic nature + high temperature of lye water was suppose to rupture the spore associated with afb.

Bleach might do a good job on mildue I would reckon.

It might be a good idea to create a thread for acceptable and non acceptable home treatments for the various problems (possible diseases) folks might encounter?
 

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I should mention that the guy that said that bleach wouldn't work suggested scorching the insides of the hive with a small gas torch. He said a temperature of around 400 degrees was the only means of killing the spores.

Possibly I should wait to post a question until I have had sufficient coffee and can remember to include all the details. ;)
 

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oh man iddee you state subsidized bee keeper in north carolina are so lucky to have an irradiation chamber. if I remember correctly irradiation is the best method in eliminating the problem of foul brood... does a very complete and through job. I wonder if any low power nuclear reactor would do the trick? I would assume (having crawed into a reactor more than once) that it is the gamma radiation that makes the spores non viable????

is the chamber in north carolina the same kind of beast that is used in one or two other places to irradiate vegetables?
 

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I don't know too many details of it. It was donated by, or purchased from, NASA when they retired it. We can use it for something like a buck a box or so. Very cheap, unless you live a good distance from the capital. Boxes have to be taken to Raliegh to have it done.
 

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srvfantexasflood said:
I should mention that the guy that said that bleach wouldn't work suggested scorching the insides of the hive with a small gas torch. He said a temperature of around 400 degrees was the only means of killing the spores.
Who would know if there are not spores somewhare on the outside of the hive boxes too, from the bees walking all over it for months?
 

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UVB from sunlight would kill off any spores outside the colony, remember bees don't get AFB from flowers, or rubbing with yellowjackets--this is a disease that relies on other bees robbing out a weaker colony, or bees drifting from one colony to another--weaker from having AFB, in turn--the now weakened colony also got it from another colony that was weakened state from AFB allowing the robbing potential. The scortching the inside of a infected colony I have heard about before, nothing about bleach or lye would think that boiling water for a extended period of time would sterilize the equipment--also remember the gloves, hive tool, brush--whatever touched the inside of the colony also needs to be sterilized prior to using on other colonies.
 

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Not to mention beekeepers making splits w/ infected brood and equipment. Which i believe is the major spreader of AFB.

Knowledge put into action is the key to "control".
 

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tecumseh said:
I think??? lye is quite a different chemical than bleach??? yes, no, huh?

I would think sqkcrk could add some more detail, but it seems to me the caustic nature + high temperature of lye water was suppose to rupture the spore associated with afb.
I can't speak from experience. I have never done this. We did learn about the process when I was in school in Ohio.

I think that there is probably something in ABC and XYZ of Beekeeping.

I also imagine that the idea is to kill the spores and to disinfect the wooden wear. Your probably likely to end up burning alot of the equipment after boiling your wooden wear in lye water. Just imagine what the condition of that stuff would be like after boiling old nailed together wood. Once boiled it may not hold together very well.
 
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