Amitraz section 18

Discussion in 'Bee News' started by Americasbeekeeper, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

    Messages:
    1,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    South Dakota received a section 18 use for Amitraz strips. Eight other states, including Florida are piggy-backing on the approval. Amitraz had a section 3 use many years ago, but the manufacturer pulled it when a batch of old material was sickening bees. The plasticizer had broken down turning dark and oily and toxic to bees. Several less than honest beekeepers used it after the notice was posted looking for easy money. White and powdery are good, brown and oily is bad. Amitraz has continued in use in less litiguous nations. Amitraz is or has goon through recent trails to get a new section 3. It is still quite effective.
     
  2. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    an Americasbeekeeper snip..
    The plasticizer had broken down turning dark and oily and toxic to bees.

    tecumseh...
    so might this do the same thing with anything plastic in the hive?

    I am uncertain what you remarks about less than honest beekeeper means? Are they leveraging this for some kind of financial gain?

    So why has South Dakota appplied for the section 18 use of this product?
     

  3. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Amitraz is the main "ingredient" in the product Apivar (not Apilife-var) up here. It was initially used as emergency use, but has since cleared hurdles and is now used otherwise. I think on Randy Oliver's site he is puzzled by the inability to get it passed south of the 49th. There is apparently little if any residue build up in combs etc.
     
  4. wadehump

    wadehump New Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Poison no matter how u use it
     
  5. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    A discussion for a tailgater type thread.
     
  6. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

    Messages:
    1,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Less than honest means 3 did not even buy the strips, and all had been accounted for when they submitted a claim. Several, I mean many, put strips in hives after the recall that were already dead at the last inspection and claimed the strips killed their hives.
     
  7. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    This year Check Mite proved to be almost useless. Guidelines are to go back to using Amitraz. I've given my hives several treatments with Amitraz over the summer and they appear to be clean----and healthy.
     
  8. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

    Messages:
    6,487
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    thanks for the explanation Americasbeekeeper. please limit these kinds of explanations (NOT) or the newer beekeeper's idea of the fundamental honesty of beekeepers may become shattered.

    and another question is Amitraz the same product incorporated into the shop towels.
     
  9. Americasbeekeeper

    Americasbeekeeper New Member

    Messages:
    1,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I do not know why they would put an insecticide/acaricide on shop towels unless you are prone to ticks and mites in your work.
    Three out of 3000 means we have more good beekeepers than crooks.
     
  10. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

    Messages:
    2,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I would like to start this topic up again. I have seen Apivar for sale at Walter T. Kelleys. I have to say, it's tempting but I am torn. I strongly prefer a more natural or close to organic solution to mites as possible. I have reverted to solid bottom boards which may eliminate one of those natural methods. But, who knows? Like Wadehump said above, it's poison either way ya cut it, right? On the other hand, I have read reports of keeps letting nature take it's course despite veterans telling them the hive would die within a year. And, their hives held their own. Or, is placing poison in our hives "the way the cookie crumbles?" Either we accept death and failure of our hives or put up with some contamination of our hive products? :|
     
  11. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Apivar has been available up here for a number of years. Randy Oliver (scientificbeekeeping) has a good read on Amitraz. If I remember correctly, he states that there is little to no residue left in the comb after treatment.
     
  12. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Amitraz is hanging around many dogs necks in the form of Preventic flea and tick collars.
     
  13. blueblood

    blueblood New Member

    Messages:
    2,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
  14. Crofter

    Crofter New Member

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    If you are using some of the other "hard" treatments, Amitraz is a good one to put into a rotation with the others to reduce mite adaptation. It apparently does not get soaked up by wax but will show up in honey if withdrawal times are not observed. Oxalic and Formic acid are not soft by most measures either but appear not to bio accumulate or become inaffective by accomodation of the mites so that is the way I lean.
     
  15. camero7

    camero7 Member

    Messages:
    715
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    My understanding is the brown strips noted above came from sellers substituting cattle strips [which were much stronger] for the bee strips. It is widely used in Alberta and one can read about it on Allen Dick's site. It is also widely used in the US [off label Taktic in many configurations].
     
  16. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Rotating treatments is usually effective in slowing down the process of pest species adapting to them. Mites are well known for their generally rapid development of "immunity" to chemical treatments.
    Check-mite is "oil soluble" and penetrates the wax AND STAYS THERE.
    Amitraz is "water soluble" and doesn't leave remnants in the wax---but must not be present in the hive when honey is coming in for extraction or else remnants will find their way into the marketed honey---a very big NO NO for honest beekeepers who sell their product or use it themselves.
     
  17. camero7

    camero7 Member

    Messages:
    715
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    My understanding is that Amitraz breaks down very fast and does not enter the honey. However, the metabolites of it are sometimes found in honey. I believe the US is now developing a acceptable level of these metabolites.
     
  18. Eddy Honey

    Eddy Honey New Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We're not allowed in Jersey yet. Our state bee inspector said he visited an apiary in Alberta, Canada where they are using it with very positive results.
     
  19. efmesch

    efmesch Active Member

    Messages:
    3,708
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
  20. PerryBee

    PerryBee New Member

    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have used it (apivar) when it was first allowed under emergency registration. Sadly it's efficacy results were thrown out when it was combined with my poor management that particular fall. I have heard good things from others, but I have switched to an acid (formic/oxalic) based treatment when necessary.