An abstract from Apidologie

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by Joe, Jan 11, 2010.

  1. Joe

    Joe New Member

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    I ran across this abstract yesterday but I haven't seen the study mentioned anywhere else. Is this noteworthy?

    Apidologie
    Received 20 March 2009 – Revised 6 July 2009 – Accepted 16 July 2009 - Published online 27 November 2009

    Abstract - The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of thymol and resveratrol administered in two different formulation modes (candy and syrup) on the development of Nosema ceranae and on the longevity of honey bees. Emerging bees from a nosema-free apiary were individually infected with 1 L of sucrose syrup containing 18000 spores of N. ceranae, placed in cages, and kept in an incubator at 33 °C and 65% RH. The experimental groups were fed candy or syrup prepared with thymol (100 ppm) or resveratrol (10 ppm). Infection levels were monitored over a 25 day period by removal and dissection of two live bees per cage. On day 25, post-infection bees fed with thymol syrup had significantly lower levels of infection ( million spores/bee) compared to control bees ( million spores/bee). Bees fed with thymol or resveratrol syrup lived significantly longer (23 and 25 days, respectively) than bees fed with control syrup (20 days). Thymol treated syrup appears to be promising in the control of nosema infection.

    Here is the link: http://www.apidologie.org/index.php?opt ... 09043.html
     
  2. Mama Beek

    Mama Beek New Member

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    That's a topic that I don't know much about at all. I do know that Thymol is accepted by some as a very effective antiviral and antibacterial compound in human use and for some animals. Thanks for the post, it's definitely interesting reading.
     

  3. naurot

    naurot New Member

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    I've heard two talks on thymol and both stated that it reduces sperm production in drones and sperm viability in the queen's spermatheca. The one guy (a former Va. apiary inspector) still uses it, but he always plans on requeening a few weeks afterwards. Here's a link.
    http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/availa ... burley.pdf
    Happy reading :wave: (it's long)
     
  4. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    thanks for the link naurot.

    this might be what flyman is asking about on another thread???
     
  5. cow pollinater

    cow pollinater New Member

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    I have seen nosema ceranea disapear after simple syrup feeding, no thymol needed!
     
  6. Joe

    Joe New Member

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    The abstract/study is done with treated syrup and "candy". In time I guess we will know know more about the criteria. I don't have any experience with Apiguard or Api Life Var but it sounds like the thymol fumes are very strong from those products. The thymolated syrup "à la Randy Oliver" would contain .25g of thymol per gallon. (if my math is right).

    http://www.scientificbeekeeping.com//in ... view&id=45
     
  7. Flyman

    Flyman New Member

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    Joe, good article. My fall thymol syrup treatment was ala Randy Oliver with .25g per gallon. At this level, I don't think he has seen any ill effects. Does seen to be effective on Varroa and Tracheal mites. Sure would worry about it affectiing my drones though.
     
  8. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Are you guys having problems with t-mites? Unless it is something specific to the south, T-mites are not a problem as they were in the past.

    And if they are a problem, I hope steps are being taken to have t-mite resistant bees, and not perpetuate weak genetics that can not handle t-mites, by the long-term use of thymol syrup. T-mites are one of the easiest problems to control with proper genetics.

    I do not have the full report as it is a continuing study, but large sampling of bees in the past two years, and from my own yards included, showed no t-mite levels to even worry about. Some collected samples were clean, and these were from untreated hives.
     
  9. Joe

    Joe New Member

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    Hi Mike,

    How are you doing?

    I'm using the thymol in the fall feeding as a prophylactic measure against varroa... and I guess T-mites.

    The bees I got from you two years ago didn't make it through that first hard winter. It was too bad, they looked good until I guess one very cold period and they couldn't move to more food. I've directed people in your direction when they are not to far away. The nuc I got was real nice looking. They just needed some little Carhartt's to help with the cold.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    bjorn writes:
    Are you guys having problems with t-mites? Unless it is something specific to the south, T-mites are not a problem as they were in the past.

    tecumseh:
    I would guess your thinking here Bjorn is that (much like the outbreak in England at the first of the 1900's) the hive here in the US of A that did not have the genetic resistance to t mites are now all dead?

    as far as my reading informs me it appears t mites were never enough of a problem in the south to generate a measurable economic loss. the long winters and increase in mortality made them much more lethal in the north.

    what I have suspected for some time is that some folks may worry about some plague that no longer exist and treating now represent more harm (to the bees and the beekeepers wallet) than good.
     
  11. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Joe,
    Seems like we have had a problem with poor fall brood buildup for the last couple years. The clusters seem large enough with the summer bees in September, but many die off by the end of December. Then the smaller clusters just freeze out, even with food within reach. I have seen it last year, and with this weather, I'm wondering what the toll will be this year. Many beekeepers this past fall commented on the poor fall flow. Which effects the brood cycle. We are just not getting the 60 days of full fall brood production we really need here in the north.
     
  12. BjornBee

    BjornBee New Member

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    Your on the mark.

    In the fall of 2008, there was large sampling of beeyards in the northeast. One of the things they tested for was t-mites. And all across the board, the mites were almost non-existant. If I remember correctly, about 50% showed almost none, 40% had a small amount, and about 10% would have something of a higher rate. But from a threshhold number, almost no hives were infested. These numbers would indicate a natural spread of possibilities as seen with the random genetics and the handling of mites.

    It would be wise for beekeepers and breeders to let nature continue to cull out strains unable to deal with t-mites, since the infested rate is so low. We are already to a point with t-mites, that if this was the same with v-mites, beekeeping would drastically improve.