An alternative to poison?

Discussion in 'General Beekeeping' started by matt22324, Nov 10, 2010.

  1. matt22324

    matt22324 New Member

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    Hello,

    I am after some advice on removing a bee hive from inside a wall cavity without cutting the internal gyprock (or in the States I believe you call it a 'dry wall') wall or poisoning the hive.

    About three weeks ago, a swarm of bees took up residence in the outside wall of my house. They got inside the cavity through a small gap between the metal window frame and the brick wall. I am kind of annoyed that when this house was built in the 80's, the window fitters didn't spend 10 minuites with a caulking gun filling the gaps between the brick and metal window frames. I am extremely adverse to the killing of bees and we can't afford to rip the internal dry wall down, remove the hive and rebuild the wall so I decided to just accept it and let them live in the wall. Well I was happy with my solution but my wife wasn't. "They will eventually eat away the brick and destroy the plaster wall" she said, and then she went and booked an Exterminator who is coming in a weeks time. He is using a air compressor that sprays a fine talcum like powder that is deadly to bees but otherwise 'enviromentally friendly'. Aparently it is over for the hive in ten minutes flat and the powder permeates through the entire hive.

    I am not happy about this but my wife insists. I am after any advice on how to expell the hive from cavity permenantly with a chemical repellant, or some other method without killing them. (Or even if I can minimise killed bees by getting most of them out before the exterminator comes etc) Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Since they have been in there three weeks they have set up house and the queen is probably laying eggs by now. The bees will be making comb and bringing in nectar and pollen. If the exterminator just kills the bees what is to become of the wax comb that is holding the nectar/honey, pollen and brood? It will eventually melt and could possibly come through the gyprock, not to mention the ants that will come for the sticky mess. There is only two ways to properly remove the bees, do a cut out which involves actually cutting the wall open to expose the bees and comb (can be completed in a day) or do a trap out which involves putting a screen cone over the entrance of the hive and using a bait hive to collect the bees in (can take 45 days to complete).

    I am assuming you are fixing to go into summer down under so that means the bees are working very hard to get built up.

    Kind of sounds like the wife has made the call on this one, good luck with it and if you need or want more info just ask away.
     

  3. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    do you have any ants in Australia?

    ps... even killer bees have never been known to eat sheet rock or brick or wood.
     
  4. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    First, your wife is entirely wrong. The bees do NOT damage brick or gyprock. They will do NO structural damage to a house.

    Secondly, in 3 weeks time, a large swarm can amass as much as 30 to 40 kilograms of honey. If they are killed, this honey will no longer be protected and will be destroyed by mice, ants, roaches, and other vermin the bees could have kept at bay.

    The result will be honey running down the gyprock and destroying it. Get your wife an education on honeybees in time to cancel the exterminator. He is going to cause you much more expense than the bees ever would.

    Go to this link and follow the 5 links there and read each one carefully. The bees can be removed and saved with no damage to the house. It can also be done in 1 day by removing about 1 sq. meter of gypboard, which is very cheap to replace.

    viewtopic.php?f=35&t=1488
     
  5. Hobie

    Hobie New Member

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    iddee makes excellent points about the damage the unattended honey and comb can attract.

    My 2 cents worth: I have a hard time believing that anything that will kill bees can be called "environmentally friendly." Would the exterminator let his child play in it? Not to mention that he'll be blowing this powdery stuff inside your walls. No house is air-tight. You will probably be breathing it.
     
  6. matt22324

    matt22324 New Member

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    Thankyou for all the advice fellas. tecumseh, in response to your question. Yeah, we got ants here, big ones, little ones, termites etc. Well, I called a bee keeper around. And called two more. I have a feeling they were ALL ametuer because one suggested I use fly spray!! (Because all his hives were full and has room for no more bees) and the other came around and said there were probably two hives in there and the Exterminator is the only way - all within ear shot of my lovely wife so she is %100 set on calling the exterminator. I have shown her the responses in this thread to hopefully talk some sense into her but to no avail. I have one more question, that sweet almond chemical (can't remember what it's called it is a repellent), would heaps of that placed under the nest (I can drop some under the nest from inside the roof down the brick and wall cavity from above), get them out? What about continuous smoking from inside the cavity somehow? Will a disco smoke machine smoke them out? I could take a roof tile off to vent and leave it running for a day or so, feeding a tube through a 20mm hole on the bottom of the wall, the smoke is non toxic.
     
  7. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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    Even if you drive the bees out, guess what is left behind again!!
     
  8. Iddee

    Iddee New Member

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    If your wife is so hard to teach, then maybe the only way to get through to her is to let her have 50 kilos of honey pouring down her walls and all the vermin that comes with it. Then when another swarm moves in next year, and they will, because the smell will still be there, maybe she will have them removed properly then.

    The exterminator will give her a lesson she won't soon forget.
     
  9. matt22324

    matt22324 New Member

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    G3farms,

    At least if I can drive them out they won't be killed. I honestly don't mind repairing the wall I just worry for the bees wellfare.
     
  10. tecumseh

    tecumseh New Member

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    I suspect the removal without really knowing exactly the way in which your house was built would be difficult. Likely there are two cavities within the wall where the hive might come to reside.....1) between the brick and the studded wall and 2) inside the stud walls. or 3) if the house in block inside the block. At this point where the nest has come to reside is anyone's guess.

    another option might be.... let the swarm stay where it is and come winter time (yours) caulk up the holes and seal the hive inside the cavity. not the best of options but ANOTHER option.

    matt writes:
    have one more question, that sweet almond chemical (can't remember what it's called it is a repellent), would heaps of that placed under the nest (I can drop some under the nest from inside the roof down the brick and wall cavity from above), get them out? What about continuous smoking from inside the cavity somehow? Will a disco smoke machine smoke them out? I could take a roof tile off to vent and leave it running for a day or so, feeding a tube through a 20mm hole on the bottom of the wall, the smoke is non toxic.

    tecumseh:
    the products names are BeeGo and BeeQuick. The BeeGo works at a bit lower temperature than BeeQuick. Here they will not ship BeeGo via the mail. I think perhaps you could be on to something here if your day time temperature is getting warm. I do know that if you put even a little BeeQuick on a fume board and leave it a bit too long when the temperature is pushing 90 it will vacate ever bee from a hive.

    Good luck...
     
  11. rgy

    rgy New Member

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    why not buy some equipement, tear into the wall, band the comb full of brood and honey into your new frames and start your OWN hive in the yard!!! Bees are saved, honey is out of the wall, wife is happy and you have a great new hobby!!!!!!!!!!!!

    there is another forum that has a section for "down under beekeepers" maybe post there and you will get some help from a more experienced beek. I'm sure you can find the forum with google.
     
  12. G3farms

    G3farms New Member

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